Spirituality
Diving deeper into developmental dyslexia  SCIENCE DAILY · 11 hours
Men with dyslexia have altered structural connections between the thalamus and auditory cortex on the left side of the brain, new research reveals. The study extends similar observations of the dyslexic visual system and highlights the importance of... more
Ancient 'Tomb' Unearthed in Guatemala Turns Out to Be Maya Steam Bath  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
Archaeologists have discovered an ancient steam bath that the Maya likely used for religious rituals — and possibly relaxation — more than 2,500 years... more
Iran to launch two satellites in 'coming days'  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Iran's president said Monday the Islamic republic plans to launch two domestically made satellites into orbit in the "coming days" to gather information on the country's environment, state TV reported. more
'GMA' Train My Way: Coming back from having a baby  ABC NEWS · 2 days
Yoga instructor Heidi Kristoffer, a mom of three, shares tips for new moms. more
WATCH: 'GMA' Train My Way: Coming back from having a baby  ABC NEWS · 2 days
Yoga instructor Heidi Kristoffer, a mom of three, shares tips for new moms. more
Muslim family: Hospital guard said they looked 'scary'  ABC NEWS · 4 days
A Muslim family says staff at a Virginia hospital told them they looked "scary" and threatened to kick them out when they went to visit a newborn relative in December more
Illuminating women's role in the creation of medieval manuscripts  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers have revealed direct evidence of medieval women's involvement in the production of illuminated manuscripts. Lapis lazuli in the dental calculus of a woman buried at a 12th-century German monastery... more
Medieval womens early involvement in manuscript production suggested by lapis lazuli identification in dental calculus  Science Magazine · 6 days
During the European Middle Ages, the opening of long-distance Asian trade routes introduced exotic goods, including ultramarine, a... more
Illuminating women's role in the creation of medieval manuscripts  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
During the European Middle Ages, literacy and written texts were largely the province of religious institutions. Richly illustrated manuscripts were created in monasteries for use by members of religious institutions... more
Kosher high-tech office lures Jerusalem's ultra-Orthodox  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The office in central Jerusalem at first glance resembles many other start-ups—until you notice the religious books and entrepreneurs in traditional black suits. more
The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal.... more
How writing technology shaped classical thinking  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The Roman poet Lucretius' epic work "De rerum natura," or "On the Nature of Things," is the oldest surviving scientific treatise written in Latin. Composed around 55 B.C.E., the text is a lengthy piece of contrarianism.... more
The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered at the bottom of a clay pound... more
Indian scientists slam ancient Hindu 'stem cell' claim  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The organisers of a major Indian science conference distanced themselves Sunday from speakers who used the prestigious event to dismiss Einstein's discoveries and claim ancient Hindus invented stem cell research. more
1.32 Million Jews Were Killed in Just Three Months During the Holocaust  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
Operation Reinhard, known as the single largest murder campaign during the Holocaust, was worse than historians imagined. more
Archaeologists find Mexico temple to god of skinning sacrifices  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Archaeologists in Mexico have found the first temple to the pre-Hispanic deity Xipe Totec, a god of fertility and war who was worshipped by sacrificing and skinning captives. more
Quantifying the Holocaust: Hyperintense kill rates during the Nazi genocide  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Operation Reinhard (1942–1943) was the largest single murder campaign of the Holocaust, during which some 1.7 million Jews from German-occupied Poland were murdered by the Nazis. Most perished... more
How we built a tool that detects the strength of Islamophobic hate speech on Twitter  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
In a landmark move, a group of MPs recently published a working definition of the term Islamophobia. They... more
Amy Robach on how running has transformed her  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
"Running has been my therapy, my meditation, my escape for the past 25 years." more
Researchers compile atlas of genetic influences on osteoporosis  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A ground-breaking new study led by researchers from the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) has succeeded in compiling an atlas of genetic factors associated with estimated bone... more
WATCH: How meditation can help you in 2019  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
Dan Harris, author of "Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics," shares his top meditation tips for starting the new year off right. more
WATCH: How meditation can help you in the new year  ABC NEWS · 2 weeks
ABC News' Dan Harris discusses his book "Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics" and how meditation can help you as 2019 approaches. more
Quake from Mount Etna volcano jolts Sicily, sparks panic  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A quake triggered by Mount Etna's eruption jolted eastern Sicily before dawn Wednesday, injuring at least 10 people, damaging churches and houses on the volcano's slopes and prompting panicked villagers... more
10 Fascinating Biblical-Era Discoveries from 2018  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
In 2018, archaeologists found the face of Jesus, discovered the visage of an ancient king, and might have uncovered a long-lost kingdom. more
Divining roots: Revealing how plants branch out to access water  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water. more
Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies. more
Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area... more
Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over... more
Camera trap study reveals the hidden lives of island carnivores  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Researchers placed 160 cameras on 19 of the 22 Apostle Islands in northern Wisconsin to see which carnivores were living there. After taking more than 200,000 photos over... more
Divining roots—revealing how plants branch out to access water  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
New research has discovered how plant roots sense the availability of moisture in soil and then adapt their shape to optimise acquisition of water. more
Genetic study reveals how citrus became the Med's favorite squeeze  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Genetic detective work has illuminated the important role of Jewish culture in the widespread adoption of citrus fruit by early Mediterranean societies. more
Quantum Maxwell's demon 'teleports' entropy out of a qubit  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, ETH Zurich, and Argonne National Laboratory, U.S, have described an extended quantum Maxwell's demon, a device locally violating the second law... more
WATCH: Veteran who lost both legs in Iraq war finds healing in yoga  ABC NEWS · 4 weeks
When army veteran Dan Nevins asks his yoga class to wiggle their toes, he can't do the same. more
At Jesus's birthplace, an app is born to ease crowds  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Bethlehem is buzzing, with more tourists expected this Christmas than have visited the Biblical city in years, causing the kind of problem that modern technology was almost born... more
Are the late Stephen Hawking's religious beliefs typical of U.K. scientists?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
The late Stephen Hawking famously didn't believe in God. Neither does the renowned Richard Dawkins. But is that typical for U.K. scientists? more
Are the late Stephen Hawking's religious beliefs typical of U.K. scientists?  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
The late Stephen Hawking famously didn't believe in God. Neither does the renowned Richard Dawkins. But is that typical for U.K. scientists? more
Comparing the world's mega-canals  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
There are more and more big canals and pipelines transporting fresh water from places where it is abundant to places where it is needed for drinking—or for industry and agriculture. Thirty-four such mega-systems are already in place and 76 are... more
Ancient Japanese pottery includes an estimated 500 maize weevils  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Researchers have discovered an ancient Japanese pottery vessel from the late Jomon period (4500-3300 BP) with an estimated 500 maize weevils incorporated into its design. The vessel was discovered in... more
Research papers reveal an exemplar of male parental care in the animal kingdom  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
Stay-at-home dads might find their spirit animal in the smooth guardian frog of Borneo. A new pair of research papers authored by... more
Dive-bombing for love: Male hummingbirds dazzle females with a highly synchronized display  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds perform dramatic aerial courtship dives to impress females. In a new study, scientists have shown that diving males closely time key... more
Extraordinary 'faithful father' revealed by study of smooth guardian frog of Borneo  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Stay-at-home dads might find their spirit animal in the smooth guardian frog of Borneo. A new pair of research papers authored by an investigator... more
Ancient Japanese pottery includes an estimated 500 maize weevils  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Researchers have discovered an ancient Japanese pottery vessel from the late Jomon period (4500-3300 BP) with an estimated 500 maize weevils incorporated into its design. The vessel was discovered in... more
Evidence for prison sentence discrimination against Muslims 'weak'  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Offenders sentenced to prison who have Muslim names do not appear to be receiving unfairly long sentences, according to a new study of more than 8,000 UK Crown Court sentencing decisions. more
Why are people religious? A cognitive perspective  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
The quick and easy answer to why people are religious is that God – in whichever form you believe he/she/they take(s) – is real and people believe because they communicate with it and perceive... more
Gravity is mathematically relatable to dynamics of subatomic particles  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Albert Einstein's desk can still be found on the second floor of Princeton's physics department. Positioned in front of a floor-to-ceiling blackboard covered with equations, the desk seems to embody... more
A fire-breathing dragon helps fight ember attacks on thatched-roof buildings  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Visitors to the historic mountain villages in central Japan marvel at the elegance of the steep thatched-roof farmhouses found there. Known as "gassho-zukuri," Japanese for "constructed like hands... more
Assisted living’s breakneck growth leaves patient safety behind  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
They found Bonnie Walker's body floating in a pond behind her assisted living facility in South Carolina. There were puncture wounds on her ear, her temple, her jaw and her cheeks. more
How RE teachers see religion – and why it can be bad for pupils  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Wherever you stand on Cliff Richard, his 1988 number one, with its message that "Christmas is love, Christmas is peace" and "a... more
How hagfish launch slime missiles that swell 10,000 times in size
Science Magazine
Unraveling threads of bizarre hagfish's explosive slime
PHYS.ORG
Two daring spacecraft aim to bring asteroid dust back to Earth
SCIENCE-NEWS
Researchers report breakthrough in ice-repelling materials
PHYS.ORG
Habitable planets around red dwarf stars might not get enough photons to support plant life
PHYS.ORG
Gillette urges men to get rid of 'toxic masculinity' in #MeToo era
ABC NEWS
Comprehensive model captures entire life cycle of solar flares
PHYS.ORG
Time to step inside your DNA
PHYS.ORG
Romantic-era music linked to real-life romantic entanglement
PHYS.ORG
The science of steak
PHYS.ORG
Splashdown! SpaceX Dragon Returns to Earth After 2nd Space Station Delivery
SPACE.COM
Reflections from a Nobel winner: Scientists need time to make discoveries
PHYS.ORG
Cities could play a key role in pollinator conservation
PHYS.ORG
Roll-up screens and 8K resolution: What the future of television looks like
PHYS.ORG
How worm blobs behave like a liquid and a solid
SCIENCE-NEWS
Climate change spells disaster for small businesses in southern Africa
PHYS.ORG
Mapping the world's 'blue carbon' hot spots in coastal mangrove forests
PHYS.ORG
The mental health pros and cons of minority spaces in the workplace
PHYS.ORG
Atomic-scale capillaries block smallest ions, thanks to graphene
PHYS.ORG
It looks like dark matter can be heated up and moved around
PHYS.ORG
Holy cow! Mysterious blast studied with NASA telescopes
PHYS.ORG
Interstellar objects like 'Oumuamua probably crash into the sun every 30 years
PHYS.ORG
Immune system's front-line defense freezes bacteria in their tracks
PHYS.ORG
Solving the ancient mysteries of Easter Island
PHYS.ORG
Video: Fifteen years imaging the Red Planet
PHYS.ORG
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