NPR
Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave  NPR · 3 days
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some users get... more
Fentanyl-Linked Deaths: The U.S. Opioid Epidemic's Third Wave Begins  NPR · 4 days
Overdose deaths involving fentanyl are rising — up 113 percent on average each year from 2013 to 2016. Dealers are adding cheap fentanyl to the illicit drug supply, and some... more
U.S. Mathematician Becomes First Woman To Win Abel Prize, 'Math's Nobel'  NPR · 5 days
"I find that I am bored with anything I understand," Karen Uhlenbeck once said. That sentiment is part of why she won what many call the... more
Researchers Examine Who's Better At College Basketball's Free-Throw Line  NPR · 5 days
March Madness is here, and college basketball is in the spotlight. When it comes to making free throws, who is better: College players who would eventually go pro, or players... more
Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut  NPR · 1 week
With expanding markets for hemp and marijuana, some students believe that taking the class could help their careers. "I'm definitely interested in the plant and where it can go," Madison Blake said. more
Google Employee Is Credited With Calculating Most Accurate Value Of Pi  NPR · 1 week
Emma Haruka Iwao has computed over 31 trillion of its digits. She and her team calculated 31,415,926,535,897 digits of pi — crushing a 2016 record by... more
Did Cooking Really Give Us The F-Word?  NPR · 1 week
Some linguists are arguing that the advent of softer food, thousands of years ago, led to changes in biting patterns and eventually, to more frequent use of sounds like "f" and "v" in human... more
Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies  NPR · 1 week
An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered... more
Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies  NPR · 2 weeks
An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered in the... more
Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants  NPR · 2 weeks
Getting DNA into plant cells is tricky. Researchers have tried using infectious bacteria, as well as gene guns that shoot gold bullets. Then a physicist came up with... more
A Gulp Of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat A Range Of Illnesses  NPR · 2 weeks
Researchers think genetically engineered versions of microbes that can live in humans could help treat some rare genetic disorders and perhaps help... more
An Antibody-Inspired Small Molecule Could Make For A Better Flu Treatment  NPR · 2 weeks
To outsmart influenza, researchers are leveraging the biological information encoded in infection-fighting antibodies to design new drugs. One attempt neutralizes near-lethal levels of flu in mice. more
Why Partisanship Changes How People React To Noncontroversial Statements  NPR · 2 weeks
New research finds that partisans agree with bumper sticker slogans — unless they are told that those slogans were made by a leader of the opposing party. more
How Much Is Today's HIV Research Centered Around The Search For A Cure?  NPR · 3 weeks
For the second time ever, a man's HIV infection has been sent into remission. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Rowena Johnston,... more
London Patient Cleared Of HIV  NPR · 3 weeks
Doctors in London say they've successfully treated an HIV patient, but the treatment is dangerous and expensive. The news comes 12 years after a different patient was declared cured of AIDS. more
Scientists Shocked By Rare, Giant Sunfish Washed Up On California Beach  NPR · 3 weeks
They initially thought it was a type of fish known to swim near Santa Barbara. But by collaborating with Australian scientists, they found it was a... more
Double-Booked Surgeons: Study Raises Safety Questions For High-Risk Patients  NPR · 4 weeks
Most patients do fine, research suggests, when the lead surgeon steps away to begin another procedure. But patients who are older or have underlying medical conditions sometimes fare worse. more
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SPACE.COM
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PHYS.ORG
Why dangerous asteroids heading to Earth are so hard to detect
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Why dangerous asteroids heading to Earth are so hard to detect
PHYS.ORG
A brief history of science writing shows the rise of the female voice
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Fortified 'high tunnel' growing structures withstand 'bomb cyclone' winds
PHYS.ORG
4-D-printed materials can be stiff as wood or soft as sponge
PHYS.ORG
This cuckoo catfish tricks other fish into raising its head-chomping young
Science Magazine
Satellites key to addressing water scarcity
ESA
Galactic center visualization delivers star power
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Galactic center visualization delivers star power
PHYS.ORG
With a 'hello,' researchers demonstrate first fully automated DNA data storage
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Livestreamed massacre means it's time to shut down Facebook Live
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Video: Heroines of the periodic table
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