Paleontology
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Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
An Antarctic field campaign last winter led by the US and Australia has successfully extracted some of the largest samples of air dating from... more
Human teeth used as jewellery in Turkey 8,500 years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
At a prehistoric archaeological site in Turkey, researchers have discovered two 8,500-year-old human teeth, which had been used as pendants in a necklace or bracelet. Researchers have never... more
New Eocene-Period Whale Unearthed in Egypt  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
Paleontologists have announced the discovery of a new genus and species of extinct protocetid whale, based on the fossilized remains found in the Western... more
Rare find: Human teeth used as jewellery in Turkey 8,500 years ago  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
At a prehistoric archaeological site in Turkey, researchers have discovered two 8,500-year-old human teeth, which had been used as pendants in a necklace or... more
Children in the ancient Middle East were valued and vulnerable—not unlike children today  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The choices that societies make concerning the treatment of children can bring about the greatest of debates and prompt significant political action.... more
Canadian tundra formerly covered in rich forest: Ancient plant fossil record shows  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Canada's northernmost islands, Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands in Nunavut, were home to a vibrant, temperate forest 56 million years ago, according to fossil... more
Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Ancient air samples from one of Antarctica's snowiest ice core sites may add a new molecule to the record of changes to Earth's atmosphere... more
Ancient DNA confirms humans wiped out northern hemisphere's version of the penguin  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The North Atlantic was once home to a bird that bore a remarkable similarity to penguins. The great auk, also known as "the original... more
Canadian tundra formerly covered in rich forest, ancient plant fossil record shows  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The heady aroma of magnolia blossoms and lotus flowers might have wafted to your nostrils if you had gone for a walk 56 million... more
Scientists devise 'lifespan clock'  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An Australian research team say they have come up with a "lifespan clock" which provides accurate maximum age estimates for vertebrates, a key variable in the study of both living and extinct animals. more
Carolina parakeet extinction was driven by human causes, DNA sequencing reveals  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE, a joint institute of the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)) in Barcelona... more
Estimates of ecosystem carbon mitigation improved toward the goal of the Paris agreement  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Approximately 30 percent of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere by human activities, mainly through the use of fossil fuels and deforestation, is... more
The 'right' whale to save  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
You may have heard that Earth's current sixth mass extinction stems from human causes, but what does this actually look like? I present to you Exhibit A: North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis), a species disappearing at an... more
Experiments in evolution  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A new find from Patagonia sheds light on the evolution of large predatory dinosaurs. Features of the 8-meter-long specimen from the Middle Jurassic suggest that it records a phase of rapid diversification and evolutionary experimentation. more
Mass extinction of land and sea biodiversity 250 million years ago not simultaneous  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Some 250 million years ago, simultaneous mass extinctions of marine and terrestrial life occurred in an event known as the End-Permian. Or... more
World's oldest artwork uncovered in Indonesian cave: study  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An Indonesian cave painting that depicts a prehistoric hunting scene could be the world's oldest figurative artwork dating back nearly 44,000 years, pointing to an advanced artistic culture, according to new research. more
Earth was stressed before dinosaur extinction  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
New evidence gleaned from Antarctic seashells confirms that Earth was already unstable before the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. more
Tiny, Ancient Native American Weapons May Have Been Used to Train Children to Fight  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
Predating the bow and arrow, the atlatl was a dart-throwing weapon that could launch projectiles with great force. more
44,000-Year-Old Indonesian Cave Painting Is Rewriting The History Of Art  NPR · 4 days
In a cave in Indonesia, archaeologists have uncovered a stunning ancient painting of a hunting party that is thousands of years older than similar works found in Europe. more
A new early whale, Aegicetus gehennae, and the evolution of modern whale locomotion  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A newly discovered fossil whale represents a new species and an important step in the evolution of whale locomotion. more
Earth was stressed before dinosaur extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
By measuring the chemistry of fossilized seashells collected in Antarctica, researchers discovered that Earth was already experiencing carbon cycle instability before the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. more
Paleontology: Experiments in evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A new find from Patagonia sheds light on the evolution of large predatory dinosaurs. Features of the 8-m long specimen from the Middle Jurassic suggest that it records a phase of rapid diversification and evolutionary experimentation. more
Newly described fossil whale represents intermediate stage between foot-powered and tail-powered swimming  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A newly described fossil whale represents a new species and an important step in the evolution of whale locomotion, according to a University of... more
Researchers analyze artifacts to better understand ancient dietary practices  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
New research from anthropologists at McMaster University and California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB), is shedding light on ancient dietary practices, the evolution of agricultural societies and ultimately, how plants... more
Ancient lice-like insects found to feed on dinosaur feathers  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China, the U.S. and Russia has found evidence of ancient lice-like insects that fed on dinosaur feathers. In their paper published... more
Two rovers to roll on Mars again: Curiosity and Mars 2020  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Curiosity won't be NASA's only active Mars rover for much longer. Next summer, Mars 2020 will be headed for the Red Planet. While the newest rover... more
The First Evidence of 'Head Cones' Found in 3,300-Year-Old Egyptian Tomb  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
Archaeologists have uncovered two ancient Egyptian burials holding bodies wearing head cones, the first physical evidence of the practice. more
Gold and Jewels Found on Minoan Island Devoted to the Color Purple  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
A storehouse of ancient treasures, including precious jewels and gold beads, has been uncovered by archaeologists on an island near Crete devoted to making... more
Metal-organic frameworks as high-performance water desalination membranes  nanowerk · 4 days
Reverse osmosis (RO) is one of the most effective desalination technologies for producing freshwater from seawater. The reverse osmosis membrane water reclamation processes is very energy intensive - not exactly an advantage given the... more
Buried Christian (and Pagan) Basilica Discovered in Ethiopia's 'Lost Kingdom' of Aksum  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
An ancient church from the fourth century, containing both early Christian and what may be pagan artifacts, has been unearthed in a buried town... more
Buried Christian (and Pagan) Church Discovered in Ethiopia's 'Lost Kingdom' of Aksum  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
An ancient church from the fourth century, containing both early Christian and what may be pagan artifacts, has been unearthed in a buried town... more
Traveling back in time through smart archaeology  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The British explorer George Dennis once wrote, "Vulci is a city whose very name … was scarcely remembered, but which now, for the enormous treasures of antiquity it has yielded, is exalted above every... more
Sailing stone track discovered 'hiding in plain sight' in dinosaur fossil  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A sandstone slab prized for its detailed dinosaur footprints may also contain the track of a sailing stone or "walking rock." Paleontologist Paul Olsen from Lamont-Doherty... more
When penguins ruled after dinosaurs died  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
What waddled on land but swam supremely in subtropical seas more than 60 million years ago, after the dinosaurs were wiped out on sea and land? more
480-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants. They're animals related to starfish and sea urchins, with long feathery arms resting atop a stalk that keeps them anchored to the ocean floor. Sea lilies have... more
CRISPR-resistant viruses build 'safe rooms' to shield genomes from DNA-dicing enzymes  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Bacteria and the viruses that infect them are engaged in a molecular arms race as ancient as life itself. Evolution has equipped bacteria with an arsenal... more
Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted... more
Fossil fuel groups 'destroying' climate talks: NGOs  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Oil and gas groups were accused Saturday of seeking to influence climate talks in Madrid by paying millions in sponsorship and sending dozens of lobbyists to delay what scientists say is a necessary and... more
New Cretaceous-Period Mammal Unveiled  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Paleontologists have discovered the remains of a previously unknown symmetrodont mammal that lived alongside dinosaurs in what is now China. The fossils provide a record of the final... more
Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis of antidepressant  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands... more
Why some scientists want to rewrite the history of how we learned to walk  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
It's not often that a fossil truly rewrites human evolution, but the recent discovery of an ancient extinct ape has... more
Seahorse breeding project aims to recover endangered species from near extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Following a dramatic decline in numbers over the past decade, White's seahorse, also known as the Sydney seahorse, has recently been listed as an endangered species... more
Cuneiform reveals shared birthplace  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Assyriologists in Leiden have been conducting research into ancient clay tablets from the Middle East for 100 years already. What exactly do these clay tablets tell us? And why is Leiden such a good place to study them? more
A 6,000-year-old fruit fly gave the world modern cheeses and yogurts  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Historians often trace the dawn of human civilization back 10,000 years, when Neolithic tribes first settled and began farming in the Fertile Crescent, which stretches through... more
New Fossil Fills Gap in Evolution of Comma Shrimps  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A new species of comma shrimp that lived during the mid-Cretaceous period, between 95 and 90 million years... more
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the... more
Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals  Science Magazine · 1 week
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the... more
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A joint research team led by Mao Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and... more
Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a new study. more
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the... more
Self-healing liquid brings new life to battery alternative  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are a revolutionary technology, found in everything from cellphones to cars. Their ubiquity and role in breaking dependence on fossil fuels earned a trio of researchers this year's... more
Alcohol tolerance may have saved our ancestors from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The ability to process alcohol may have saved humanity's ancestors from extinction, a new book suggests. more
Solving Fossil Mystery Could Aid Mars Life Quest  ASTRO WATCH · 1 week
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. Research... more
Living at the edges  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Resembling an overgrown house cat with black-tipped ears and a stubby tail, the Canada lynx, a native of North America, teeters on the brink of extinction in the U.S. The few lynx that now roam parts of Washington and the... more
Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a study published December 4, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mauro Bernabei from the National... more
New Pterosaur Species Unearthed in Lebanon: Mimodactylus libanensis  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists in Lebanon have discovered the extremely well-preserved fossilized remains of a previously unknown Cretaceous-period flying reptile. Pterosaurs were highly... more
Global carbon emissions growth slows, but hits record high  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The runaway train that is climate change is about to blow past another milestone: global fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions will reach yet another record high. Driven by rising natural gas... more
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
The extinct sea scorpion species Jaekelopterus rhenaniae had eyes comparable to those of today's horseshoe crabs. The two-and-a-half-meter predator was... more
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The eyes of the extinct sea scorpion Jaekelopterus rhenaniae have the same structure as the eyes of modern horseshoe crabs... more
Two chiral catalysts working hand in hand  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Just as our left hand is not superposable to our right hand, the mirror image of certain molecules cannot be overlapped onto it, even when turned or twisted. These two mirror images are referred... more
Paleontologists Find Fossils of Six New Dragonfly Species  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Six new species of dragonflies that lived about 50 million years ago (early Eocene epoch) have been identified from fossils... more
Unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor revealed  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency- some estimate... more
Researchers discover a potential window for managing insects without chemicals  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40 percent of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published... more
Researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency—some... more
Scientists re-counted Australia's extinct species, and the result is devastating  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
It's well established that unsustainable human activity is damaging the health of the planet. The way we use Earth threatens our future and that of many animals and... more
How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set stage for early life  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth's dimly lit early... more
Divers of the past: Plesiosaur research reveals rapid increase of blood cell size  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
In the Mesozoic era, about 250 to 65 million years ago a large number of reptiles populated the oceans. The most successful... more
Cyber Monday Toy Deals: The Best Science Toys for Kids  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
If you have a little paleontologist, a star-gazer or a budding chemist, one of these science-inspired toys may be right for your child. Here's a look at some... more
Scientists Re-Counted Australia's Extinct Species. And the Result Is Devastating  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
In the most comprehensive assessment of its kind, researchers find that 100 endemic Australian species living in 1788 are now extinct. more
95-million-year-old fossil reveals new group of pterosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists. more
First action plan in 25 years aims to save Australia's snakes and lizards from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The status of Australian snakes and lizards has deteriorated significantly over the past two decades, with the number... more
Were Neanderthals, Denisovans and Other Archaic Humans Victims of Sixth Mass Extinction?  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. Neanderthals were stocky hunters adapted to Europe’s cold steppes, their... more
Cretaceous-Period Mammal Had Bizarre Middle Ear  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists in China have unearthed a nearly complete skeleton of a previously unknown Cretaceous mammal species with well-preserved middle ear bones. The ancient creature... more
Majungasaurus Replaced All Its Teeth Every Two Months: Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Majungasaurus, a carnivorous dinosaur that lived approximately 70 million years ago (Cretaceous period) in what is now Madagascar,... more
Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Newly-hatched tortoises take their first steps at a Bangladesh conservation park, their feet barely visible under hard shells that carry the weight of the species on their backs. more
Neanderthal Extinction Caused by Inbreeding and Smallness of Their Populations, Study Suggests  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A long-standing enigma in paleoanthropology is the demise of Neanderthals about 40,000 years ago. There is general agreement that their disappearance coincides with migration... more
Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a new study. more
Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams. more
Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Almost 40% of global land plant species are categorized as very rare, and these species are most at risk for extinction as... more
Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a study published November 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS... more
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