The bending of a hook into wire to fish for the handle of a basket is surprisingly challenging for young children under eight years of age. Now, cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists led by Isabelle Laumer and Alice Auersperg observed hook tool-making for the first time in a non-human primate species—the orangutan. To the researchers' surprise, the apes spontaneously manufactured hook tools out of straight wire within the very first trial and in a second task unbent curved wire to m... PHYS.ORG · 3 months
Experiments verify the phenomenon of a photonic hook  nanowerk · 2 weeks
Scientists have experimentally proved an earlier predicted effect of 'photonic hook' that is a new type of curved self-accelerating light beam shaped like a hook. The ease of generation and physical properties... more
Orangutans make complex economic decisions about tool use  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Flexible tool use is closely associated to higher mental processes such as the ability to plan actions. Now a group of cognitive biologists and comparative psychologists found out that the apes carefully... more
No hooks, lines or sinkers: Cambodians go traditional in fishing ceremony  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Wielding handmade bamboo baskets and nylon nets, hundreds of people waded thigh-deep into a muddy lake in eastern Cambodia on Sunday for an annual fish-catching ceremony... more
Better fish welfare using 'sensor fish'  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
After many decades of salmon farming, recent years have seen studies into fish welfare in connection with issues such as how fish are treated in their cages. In particular, the fish farming sector is looking for... more
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Twenty-six of the forty-six fish species known to live in the Murray-Darling basin are listed as rare or threatened. Recent... more
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The phenomenon tremendously important for a person's self-perception is referred to as the "Big Fish, Little Pond Effect" (BFLPE). A fish perceives itself as big when it swims in a comparatively small pond. This... more
Extreme weather and geopolitics major drivers of increasing 'food shocks'  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Global food production is suffering from an increasing number of 'food shocks,' with most caused by extreme weather and geopolitical crises. An international study looked at the incidence... more
Lake Malawi is home to unique fish species. Nearly 10% are endangered  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
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Fish Appear to Recognize Themselves in the Mirror  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
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Gory, freaky, cool: Marine snail venom could improve insulin for diabetic patients  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Although moderately mobile, marine cone snails have perfected several strategies to capture prey. Some fish-hunting species release venom into the surrounding water. Within the... more
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Those with inadequate access to food likely to suffer from obesity  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Researchers have assessed the link between food-related hardships and obesity. Using a national sample of adults across the United States, the researchers learned that individuals who... more
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A species of fish, the cleaner wrasse (Labroides dimidiatus), responds to its reflection and attempts to remove marks on its body during the mirror test—a method held as the gold standard for determining if... more
What makes the deadly pufferfish so delectable  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Some people consider pufferfish, also known as fugu, a delicacy because of its unique and exquisite flavor, which is perhaps seasoned by knowledge that consumption of the fish could be deadly. Now, researchers have... more
Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
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Scientists look to past to help identify fish threatened with local extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
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Medical News Today: Nanoparticles in food can alter the behavior of gut bacteria  MNT · 2 weeks
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To female molly and Limia fish, nothing is hotter than a male with a large dorsal fin. But these fins aren't just decorations to attract females. more
Sea of white: 'Hundreds of thousands' of fish dead in Australia  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
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