Patients with atrial fibrillation or AFib experience chaotic electrical signals in the upper chamber of their heart (atria), which cause an irregular or quivering heartbeat (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots and heart failure. AFib also is a major cause of stroke and affects 33 million people worldwide.... NEWS MEDICAL · 3 months
Former NFL players may face higher risk of atrial fibrillation  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Former National Football League (NFL) players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke. Former... more
AI could enable accurate screening for atrial fibrillation  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
A new research study shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm -- atrial fibrillation (AF) -- in an electrocardiogram (EKG), even if the heart is... more
Atrial fibrillation is common and incurable, but can be controlled  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
One of the most common problems cardiologists handle is atrial fibrillation, also called AFib or AF. AFib is an abnormal or irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood... more
AI could enable accurate and inexpensive screening for atrial fibrillation, study shows  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
A new Mayo Clinic research study shows that artificial intelligence can detect the signs of an irregular heart rhythm - atrial fibrillation in an... more
AI helps detect atrial fibrillation cheaply and reliably  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A startling new study from Mayo Clinic shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can help pick up the earliest signs of the potentially fatal irregularity in heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation (AF) on... more
Medications used to treat atrial fibrillation may raise risk of falls  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
To prevent atrial fibrillation symptoms, health professionals may treat patients with medications to control their heart rate or rhythm. However, these medications can potentially raise the... more
Scientists unveil new molecular mechanisms leading to atrial fibrillation  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
If there could be one organ in the body that works 24/7 nonstop and makes sure the cells get the oxygen and nutrients they need, it’s the heart. The heart... more
Former NFL players may have greater risk of atrial fibrillation  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
Former National Football League players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation compared to men of similar age who did not play professional football, according... more
Researchers discover new blood-borne marker for atrial damage  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
Atrial fibrillation is a common abnormal heart rhythm. It is treated either with medications or by applying heat or extreme cold to destroy small specific tissue areas in the atrium. This inevitably... more
What's at the 'heart' of a heartbeat?  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
A new finding has changed the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to atrial fibrillation. more
Anti-arrhythmic agents linked to increased risk of falls  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Anti-arrhythmic drugs, particularly those used to treat atrial fibrillation, could increase the risk of fall-related injuries, a new study found. more
Computer simulations may guide precise treatment of patients with persistent atrial fibrillation  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created personalized digital replicas of the upper chambers of the heart and used them to guide the precise... more
Solid food feeding guides for infants may lead to overfeeding  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
Starting six-month-old infants on solid food in the amounts recommended by standard feeding guides may lead to overfeeding, according to a study by scientists at the Johns Hopkins... more
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Starting 6-month-old infants on solid food in the amounts recommended by standard feeding guides may lead to overfeeding, according to a new study. more
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Quantum light sources pave the way for optical circuits  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
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Shoebox-size breath analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
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Pilot study of 5-hour molecular test accurately distinguishes malignant and benign breast tumors  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
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Quantum light sources pave the way for optical circuits  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
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Why do different cultures see such similar meanings in the constellations?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Almost every person throughout the existence of humankind has looked up at the night sky and seen more than just a random scattering of light. Constellations... more
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The formula that makes bacteria float upstream  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
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Advanced method to accurately detect low-level somatic mutation in intractable epilepsy  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
KAIST medical scientists have developed an advanced method for perfectly detecting low-level somatic mutation in patients with intractable epilepsy. Their study showed that deep sequencing replicates... more
Tiny biodegradable circuits for releasing painkillers inside the body  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Patients fitted with an orthopedic prosthetic commonly experience a period of intense pain after surgery. In an effort to control the pain, surgeons inject painkillers into the tissue during the... more
Advanced method to accurately detect low-level somatic mutation in intractable epilepsyc  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
KAIST medical scientists have developed an advanced method for perfectly detecting low-level somatic mutation in patients with intractable epilepsy. Their study showed that deep sequencing replicates... more
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Chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer. more
How bacteria swim against the flow  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
It is well known that bacteria can swim against the current, which often causes serious problems—for example, when they spread in water pipes or in medical catheters. To prevent or at least slow down the spread... more
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