A new study of molecular interactions central to the functioning of biological clocks explains how certain mutations can shorten clock timing, making some people extreme 'morning larks' because their internal clocks operate on a 20-hour cycle instead of being synchronized with the 24-hour cycle of day and night. Researchers found that the same molecular switch mechanism affected by these mutations is at work in animals ranging from fruit flies to people.... SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Study explains how certain mutations can shorten biological clock timing  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A new study of molecular interactions central to the functioning of biological clocks explains how certain mutations can shorten clock timing, making some people extreme "morning larks" because... more
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Scientists have identified a molecular 'switch' that controls the immune machinery responsible for chronic inflammation in the body. The finding could lead to new ways to halt or even reverse many age-related conditions, from... more
Scientists discover new biological mechanism of insulin signaling  NEWS MEDICAL · 17 hours
In a discovery that may further the understanding of diabetes and human longevity, scientists at Scripps Research have found a new biological mechanism of insulin signaling. more
How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from... more
Could resetting our internal clocks help control diabetes?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
The circadian clock system allows the organisms to adjust to periodical changes of geophysical time. Today, increasing evidence show that disturbances in our internal clocks stemming from frequent time zone changes, irregular... more
Zinc lozenges did not shorten the duration of colds  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Administration of zinc acetate lozenges to common cold patients did not shorten colds in a randomized trial. more
Noncoding RNA transcription alters chromosomal topology to promote isotype-specific class switch recombination  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
B cells undergo two types of genomic alterations to increase antibody diversity: introduction of point mutations into immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain (IgH and IgL)... more
Molecular mechanism of biased signaling in a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor  Science Magazine · 6 days
Biased signaling, in which different ligands that bind to the same G protein–coupled receptor preferentially trigger distinct signaling pathways, holds great promise for the design of... more
How electric fields affect a molecular twist within light-sensitive proteins  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A team of scientists has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way energy from light drives molecular motion and transformation in a protein commonly used in... more
Molecular mechanism of SHP2 activation by PD-1 stimulation  Science Magazine · 4 weeks
In cancer, the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway suppresses T cell stimulation and mediates immune escape. Upon stimulation, PD-1 becomes phosphorylated at its immune receptor tyrosine–based inhibitory motif (ITIM) and immune receptor tyrosine–based... more
Circadian rhythms in the absence of the clock gene Bmal1  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Circadian (~24 hour) clocks have a fundamental role in regulating daily physiology. The transcription factor BMAL1 is a principal driver of a molecular clock in mammals. Bmal1 deletion... more
Researchers provide first insight into innovative approach for diabetes care  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
The circadian clock system (from Latin "circa diem", about a day) allows the organisms to anticipate periodical changes of geophysical time, and to adjust to these changes. Nearly... more
Global study maps cancer mutations in large catalogue  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Mutations in 38 different types of cancer have been mapped by means of whole genome analysis by an international team of researchers. A catalogue of the cancer mutations will be available worldwide... more
Vernalization study defines additional phase in universal epigenetic mechanism  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
In many plants the timing of flowering is controlled by a range of environmental and molecular signals. more
NASA's ECOSTRESS mission sees plants 'waking up' from space  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Although plants don't sleep in the same way humans do, they have circadian rhythms—internal clocks that, like our own internal clocks, tell them when it's night and when it's day.... more
Pumping mechanism of NM-R3, a light-driven bacterial chloride importer in the rhodopsin family  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
A newly identified microbial rhodopsin, NM-R3, from the marine flavobacterium Nonlabens marinus, was recently shown to drive chloride ion uptake, extending our... more
First artificial enzyme with non-biological catalytic sites created  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A new study published in the journal Nature Catalysis on February 10, 2020, reports the creation of a new artificial enzyme from two components, both non-biological in origin. This event marks the... more
New multiplatform photon switch for application in quantum technology  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
An international team led by the Institute of Materials Science (ICMUV) of the University of Valencia has developed an optical (quantum) switch that modifies the emission properties of photons, the... more
New tool monitors real time mutations in flu  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A Rutgers-led team has developed a tool to monitor influenza A virus mutations in real time, which could help virologists learn how to stop viruses from replicating. more
The officer for animal research of the Max Planck Society explains new regulations  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
For the first time, the European Union has published detailed statistics on animal research. Andreas Lengeling, the officer for animal research of... more
New tool monitors real time mutations in flu  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
A team has developed a tool to monitor influenza A virus mutations in real time, which could help virologists learn how to stop viruses from replicating. more
Insulin signaling suppressed by decoys  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In a discovery that may further the understanding of diabetes and human longevity, scientists at Scripps Research have found a new biological mechanism of insulin signaling. Their study, involving the roundworm C. elegans, reveals that a "decoy" receptor... more
New pathogenic mechanism for influenza NS1 protein found  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers report the biological effects of influenza protein NS1 binding to RIG-I -- the binding directly quiets the alarm that activates the cellular innate immunity defense against the infection. This is a... more
New insights may guide design of light-sensitive proteins with desired properties  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University has gained insight into how electric fields affect the way... more
Gold bond formation tracked in real time using new molecular spectroscopy technique  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The bond created between two gold atoms in a molecule has been observed as it forms, thanks to a new technique developed by RIKEN... more
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