Wearable electronic human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are an emerging class of devices to facilitate human and machine interactions. Advances in electronics, materials and mechanical designs have offered pathways toward commercial wearable HMI devices. However, existing devices are uncomfortable since they restrict the human body's motion with slow response times and challenges to realize multiple functions. In a recent report on Science Advances, Kyoseung Sim and an interdisciplinary research tea... PHYS.ORG · 4 months
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Electrical and optical control of single spins integrated in scalable semiconductor devices  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
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Older adults and wearable activity trackers  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
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Exciton control in a room temperature bulk semiconductor with coherent strain pulses  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
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First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
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