"Jumping genes"—bits of DNA that can move from one spot in the genome to another—are well-known for increasing genetic diversity over the long course of evolution. Now, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that such genes, also called transposable elements, play another, more surprising role: stabilizing the 3-D folding patterns of the DNA molecule inside the cell's nucleus.... PHYS.ORG · 1 month
DNA misfolding linked to heightened risk for Type 1 diabetes  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
It's known that genetics, or an inherited genome, is a major determinant of one's risk for autoimmune diseases, like Type 1 diabetes. In human cells, a person's genome--about... more
Earliest interbreeding event between ancient human populations discovered  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
For three years, anthropologist Alan Rogers has attempted to solve an evolutionary puzzle. His research untangles millions of years of human evolution by analyzing DNA strands from ancient human species known as... more
Comparing DNA-repair gene mutations in African American and Caucasian men with prostate cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Pathogenic or likely pathogenic alterations in these 14 DNA repair genes were less likely to be detected in African Americans as compared... more
New way to chart human genome with CRISPR/nanopore sequencing technique  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
In search of new ways to sequence human genomes and read critical alterations in DNA, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used the gene cutting... more
Researchers succeed in creating complex pattern of hives  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
Hives afflict 1 in 5 people, but the exact mechanisms behind the itchy red rashes are not well known. The research team studied the patterns of hives in patients and reproduced the... more
CRISPR gene cuts may offer new way to chart human genome  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
In search of new ways to sequence human genomes and read critical alterations in DNA, researchers say they have successfully used the gene cutting tool CRISPR... more
CRISPR gene cuts may offer new way to chart human genome  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
In search of new ways to sequence human genomes and read critical alterations in DNA, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used the... more
A host's genes likely influence the spread of antibiotic resistance  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
In the gastrointestinal tract of host animals, bacteria can exchange the genes responsible for antibiotic resistance (AR) via small, circular chunks of DNA called plasmids. However, the process... more
A chemist investigates how proteins assume their shape  MIT · 4 days
Matt Shoulders hopes to shed light on diseases linked to flawed protein folding. more
Coral genes go with the flow further than expected  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
The southern Red Sea is more readily connected with the Indian Ocean than with the northern Red Sea, according to simulations carried out at KAUST. This helps explain genetic patterns... more
Genes from scratch: Far more common and important than we thought  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Scientists have discovered that de novo genes -- genes that have evolved from scratch -- are both more common and more important than previously believed. more
Random gene pulsing generates patterns of life  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A team of Cambridge scientists working on the intersection between biology and computation has found that random gene activity helps patterns form during development of a model multicellular system. more
Physically producing computer-generated artificial genomes to understand DNA  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The molecular blueprint of life is stored in DNA within the genome. The digital revolution in biology, driven by DNA sequencing, enables scientists to read the genomes of the many microbes and... more
De novo genes far more common and important than scientists thought  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Scientists from Trinity and the University of Pittsburgh have discovered that de novo genes—genes that have evolved from scratch—are both more common and more important than... more
Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are opposite to previously observed  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 month
Using the latest satellite technology from the European Space Agency (ESA), scientists have been tracking patterns of mass loss from Pine Island -- Antarctica's... more
Patterns of thinning of Antarctica's biggest glacier are opposite to previously observed  PHYS.ORG · 1 month
Using the latest satellite technology from the European Space Agency (ESA), scientists from the University of Bristol have been tracking patterns of mass loss... more
DNA-tagging strategy for early detection of disease signatures  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Researchers can uncover how proteins interact with other proteins with far greater sensitivity and in a more natural context than conventional methods, thanks to an analytic technique developed by a RIKEN team.... more
DNA extracted from museum specimens can provide genetic information  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
DNA in preserved museum specimens can allow scientists to explore the history of species and humanities impact on the ecosystem, but samples are typically preserved in formaldehyde which can damage... more
DNA extracted in museum samples can reveal genetic secrets  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
DNA in preserved museum specimens can allow scientists to explore the history of species and humanities impact on the ecosystem, but samples are typically preserved in formaldehyde which can damage... more
Genome stability: Intricate process of DNA repair discovered  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
An elaborate system of filaments, liquid droplet dynamics and protein connectors enables the repair of some damaged DNA in the nuclei of cells, researchers have found. The findings further challenge the belief... more
Exceptional catapulting jump mechanism in a tiny beetle could be applied in robotic limbs  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
The fascinating and highly efficient jumping mechanism in flea beetles has been described. Despite having been known since 1929, the... more
Iodide salts stabilize biocatalysts for fuel cells  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Oxygen is the greatest enemy of biocatalysts for energy conversion. A protective film shields them—but only with an additional ingredient: iodide salt. more
Researchers discover intricate process of DNA repair in genome stability  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
An elaborate system of filaments, liquid droplet dynamics and protein connectors enables the repair of some damaged DNA in the nuclei of cells, researchers at the University of... more
DNA nanostructures suit up for future missions  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Beating cancer and a plethora of other diseases does not only depend on getting hold of the right drugs—it's also about getting them to the right places in the body, while keeping damage to... more
Promega introduces Wizard HMW DNA Extraction Kit ahead of AGBT 2020  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Promega Corporation, a global biotechnology manufacturer, today launched its new Wizard HMW DNA Extraction Kit for researchers working with large fragments of genomic DNA. more
New roles for DNA-packaging proteins  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
How can human cells pack 3-meter-long DNA into their tiny nuclei and unpack it only where and when it is needed? This fascinating process is far from being completely understood. more
DNA topological problems may cause lymphoma, study shows  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, and the Andalusian Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Seville, published today a paper in Nature Communications that shows that DNA topological problems... more
Hardy microbe’s DNA could be a time capsule for the ages  Science Magazine · 1 week
Artist and DNA storage pioneer says microbes entombed in salt could preserve a lasting record of humanity more
Long noncoding RNA can protect our metabolism against metabolic complications  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 weeks
Unlike what we commonly refer to as 'genes', these phantom genes or 'Long noncoding RNA' (LncRNAs) do not lead to the production of proteins that our cells, and... more
IDT's new xGen Prism DNA Library Prep Kit launched  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Integrated DNA Technologies, a leading comprehensive genomics solutions provider, has launched the xGen Prism DNA Library Prep Kit, designed to produce high-quality Next Generation Sequencing data from precious but challenging... more
MORE SCIENCE VIDEO
New patented invention stabilizes, rotates satellites
SCIENCE DAILY
Why drought-busting rain depends on the tropical oceans
PHYS.ORG
How genetic testing is helping scientists save animals from disease and illegal hunting
PHYS.ORG
Wearable continuous monitoring tool helps manage mental health
NEWS MEDICAL
Video: Deep-sea footage helps researchers understand octopod real estate
PHYS.ORG
VR helps cardiologist detect patient's injury and repair a broken heart
NEWS MEDICAL
Physically producing computer-generated artificial genomes to understand DNA
PHYS.ORG
Researchers shrink laser-induced graphene for flexible electronics
PHYS.ORG
New algorithm helps uncover forgotten figures beneath Da Vinci painting
PHYS.ORG
Student-designed 3-D-printed model of stadium helps police prepare for Super Bowl
PHYS.ORG
A math teacher's plea: Let's keep pi irrational
PHYS.ORG
FRESH SCIENCE