The Swedish Malaise Trap Project (SMTP) was launched in 2003 with the aim of making a complete list of the insect diversity of Sweden. Over the past fifteen years, an estimated total of 20 million insects, collected during the project, have been processed for scientific study. Recently, the team behind this effort published the resulting inventory in the open-access journal Biodiversity Data Journal. In their paper, they also document the project all the way from its inception to its current sta... PHYS.ORG · 1 month
How quickly do flower strips in cities help the local bees?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Many cities are introducing green areas to protect their fauna. Amongst such measures are flower strips, which provide support to flower-visiting insects, insect- and seed-eating birds.... more
Study provides new insights into brain evolution  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Their researches on the lamprey brain has enabled researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden to push the birth of the cortex back in time by some 300 million years to over 500 million years... more
New study reveals early evolution of cortex  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Research on the lamprey brain has enabled researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden to push the birth of the cortex back in time by some 300 million years to over 500 million years ago,... more
Bats depend on conspecifics when hunting above farmland  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Common noctules -- one of the largest bat species native to Germany -- are searching for their fellows during their hunt for insects above farmland. Scientists show that bats forage on their... more
Aerial insect trap network describes life in the skies  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Like most invasive species, when the soybean aphid arrived in the Midwest in 2000, it brought none of its natural enemies along for the ride. So, naturally, finding itself in... more
Mathematical epidemiology: How to model a pandemic  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Disease has afflicted humans ever since there have been human. Malaria and tuberculosis are thought to have ravaged Ancient Egypt more than 5,000 years ago. From AD 541 to 542 the global pandemic known... more
Bats depend on teamwork when foraging over farmland  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) have reported in a paper published in the journal Oikos that bats forage on their own in insect-rich forests, but hunt... more
How quickly do flower strips in cities help the local bees?  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Insects rely on a mix of floral resources for survival. Populations of bees, butterflies, and flies are currently rapidly decreasing due to the loss of flower-rich... more
Book on plants in the Murmansk region (Russia) scores 4/19 correct insect identifications  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A recently published book on some aspects of the ecology of woody introducents in the Murmansk oblast of Russia provides the information... more
Hodor 'holds the door' open for a potential new way to curb mosquito populations  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The identification of an insect-specific metal-sensing receptor in the gut lining highlights a possible new way to curb populations of... more
Beetles changed their diet during the Cretaceous period  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Like a snapshot, amber preserves bygone worlds. Paleontologists have now described four new beetle species in fossilized tree resin from Myanmar, which belong to the Kateretidae family. As well as the about... more
Hodor 'holds the door' open for a potential new way to curb mosquito populations  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The identification of an insect-specific metal-sensing receptor in the gut lining highlights a possible new way to curb populations of... more
20 of the worst epidemics and pandemics in history  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
Disease outbreaks have ravaged humanity from prehistory to modern times, sometimes changing the course of history and even wiping out entire civilizations. more
The brains of shrimps and insects are more alike than we thought  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
New research shows that crustaceans such as shrimps, lobsters and crabs have more in common with their insect relatives than previously thought—when it comes... more
'Little Foot' skull reveals how human ancestor more than 3 million years old lived  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
High-resolution micro-CT scanning of the skull of the fossil specimen known as 'Little Foot' has revealed some aspects of how... more
The coronavirus is changing how we work—possibly permanently  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Nearly a million people in Canada have already applied for employment insurance, and analysts are predicting that coronavirus-related jobless claims in the United States could exceed three million. Job loss is only... more
E-cigarette use increases while new studies reveal heart health risks  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
A new study adds to mounting evidence that the use of electronic cigarettes, or vaping, has increased in recent years among U.S. adults, with nearly 1 in 20... more
New study reveals early evolution of cortex  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Research on the lamprey brain has enabled researchers to push the birth of the cortex back in time by some 300 million years to over 500 million years ago, providing new insights into brain... more
Rare lizard fossil preserved in amber  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 month
The tiny forefoot of a lizard of the genus Anolis was trapped in amber about 15 to 20 million years ago. Every detail of this rare fossil is visible under the microscope. But the seemingly very... more
Beetles changed their diet during the Cretaceous period  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Like a snapshot, amber preserves bygone worlds. An international team of paleontologists from the University of Bonn has now described four new beetle species in fossilized tree resin from Myanmar, which belong... more
Over 60% of Myanmar's mangroves deforested in the last 20 years  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Mangroves account for only 0.7% of the Earth's tropical forest area, but they are among the world's most productive and important ecosystems. They provide a wealth... more
Weaving insect wildlife back into the tapestry of life  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Insects are fundamental to the functioning of land and freshwater ecosystems. They permeate all aspects of these ecosystems, chewing and pooing, pollinating, seed spreading and affecting each other's population levels... more
The fight to save Europe's olive trees from disease  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A plant disease spread by sap-sucking insects has been devastating olive and fruit orchards across southern Europe, but scientists are inching closer to halting its spread with the help of... more
Fossil finds give clues about flying reptiles in the Sahara 100 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Three new species of toothed pterosaurs -- flying reptiles of the Cretaceous period, some 100 million years ago -- have... more
Malnourished bugs: Higher carbon levels make plants less nutritious, hurting insect populations  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Grasshopper populations, like those of many other insects, are declining. My colleagues and I identified a new possible culprit: The plants grasshoppers rely on... more
Rare lizard fossil preserved in amber  PHYS.ORG · 1 month
The tiny forefoot of a lizard of the genus Anolis was trapped in amber about 15 to 20 million years ago. Every detail of this rare fossil is visible under the microscope. But the seemingly very... more
Fossil finds give clues about flying reptiles in the Sahara 100 million years ago  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Three new species of toothed pterosaurs—flying reptiles of the Cretaceous period, some 100 million years ago—have been identified in Africa... more
Identification of 'Hodor' in the gut lining highlights potential way to curb mosquito populations  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
The identification of an insect-specific metal-sensing receptor in the gut lining highlights a possible new way to curb populations of... more
The brains of shrimps and insects are more alike than we thought  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Crustaceans share a brain structure known to be crucial for learning and memory in insects, a research team discovered. more
Small horses got smaller, big tapirs got bigger 47 million years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
The former coalfield of Geiseltal in Saxony-Anhalt has yielded large numbers of exceptionally preserved fossil animals, giving palaeontologists a unique window into the evolution... more
MORE SCIENCE VIDEO
Cellular train track deformities shed light on neurological disease
PHYS.ORG
SLAC structural biologist discovers a strange cavity in key tuberculosis protein
NEWS MEDICAL
A device for the early detection of certain eyesight problems
PHYS.ORG
As the ocean warms, marine species relocate toward the poles: study
PHYS.ORG
Wildfire perceptions largely positive after hiking in a burned landscape
PHYS.ORG
Supply chain outlook: Why the situation varies by industry
PHYS.ORG
Printing complex cellulose-based objects
PHYS.ORG
Anatomy of a frogfish: New book explores world of fishes with arms, legs
PHYS.ORG
New 3-D view of methane tracks sources
PHYS.ORG
Coronavirus: Racism and the long-term impacts of emergency measures in Canada
PHYS.ORG