Bees are pollinators of many wild and crop plants, but in many places their diversity and density is declining. A research team from the Universities of Göttingen, Sussex and Würzburg has now investigated the foraging behaviour of bees in agricultural landscapes. To do this, the scientists analysed the bees' dances, which are called the "waggle dance." They found out that honey bees prefer strawberry fields, even if they flowered directly next to the oilseed rape fields. Only when oilseed rape w... PHYS.ORG · 1 month
Engineered symbionts activate honey bee immunity and limit pathogens  Science Magazine · 4 weeks
Honey bees are essential pollinators threatened by colony losses linked to the spread of parasites and pathogens. Here, we report a new approach for manipulating bee gene expression and protecting... more
Bees prioritize their unique waggle dance to find flowers  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
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Bees are an important factor for our environment and our sustenance. Without insect pollination, many plant species—including various crops—cannot reproduce. "Bee mortality therefore affects food supply for human beings," said Professor Sara Leonhardt, who specializes in... more
Study reveals evolutionary clues to honeybees' social complexity  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
The complex social life of honeybees—with their queens and workers cooperating to produce honey—is deeply entrenched in the public's imagination. But the majority of the world's more than 20,000 bee species are... more
'Atomic dance' reveals new insights into performance of 2-D materials  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team of Northwestern University materials science researchers have developed a new method to view the dynamic motion of atoms in atomically thin 2-D materials. The imaging technique,... more
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Researchers used electron microscopy to observe the cause of failure in a widely used 2D material, which could help researchers develop more stable and reliable materials for flexible... more
New study identifies bumble bees' favorite flowers to aid bee conservation  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Many species of North American bumble bees have seen significant declines in recent decades. Bumble bees are essential pollinators for both native and agricultural plants, and... more
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Fossilized insect from 100 million years ago is oldest record of primitive bee with pollen  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Beetle parasites clinging to a primitive bee 100 million years ago may have caused the flight error that,... more
Fossilized insect from 100 million years ago is oldest record of primitive bee with pollen  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Beetle parasites clinging to a primitive bee 100 million years ago may have caused the flight error that,... more
99-Million-Year-Old Bee Found Encased in Burmese Amber  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
In a paper published online in the journal Palaeodiversity, Oregon State University’s Professor George Poinar Jr. described a new family, genus and... more
19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems  PHYS.ORG · 1 month
Despite being "neotropical-forest-loving creatures," some orchid bees are known to tolerate habitats disturbed by human activity. However, little did the... more
19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
About 120 clusters of 19th-century orchid bee nests were found during restoration work on the altarpiece of Basilica Cathedral in... more
Freeze-dried strawberries and ice cream make for a very stable relationship  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
ARS researchers have shown some freeze-dried berry powders—especially freeze-dried strawberry powder—can act as outstanding stabilizers in ice cream and other frozen dairy desserts. more
Climate change contributes to widespread declines among bumble bees across continents  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
Climate change could increase species’ extinction risk as temperatures and precipitation begin to exceed species’ historically observed tolerances. Using long-term data for 66 bumble bee species... more
Why are these sharks doing the 'pipi' dance?  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 weeks
A group of sharks writhing in shallow water may have looked like they were beached, but they weren't injured or in distress. more
Why monkeys choose to drink alone  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Why do some people almost always drop $10 in the Salvation Army bucket and others routinely walk by? One answer may be found in an intricate and rhythmic neuronal dance between two specific brain regions, finds... more
For Kid's Coughs, Swap The Over-The-Counter Syrups For Honey  NPR · 3 weeks
For parents desperate to calm a kid's hacking cough, so the whole family can get some sleep, turns out there's evidence that a common kitchen ingredient works better than OTC... more
Backyard gardeners can act to help bee populations  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Chemicals are routinely applied around residential landscapes to kill insect pests and troublesome weeds, but many are indiscriminate and devastate pollinators in the process. more
Tiny Dancer: Scientists spy on booty-shaking bees to help conservation  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
We've long known honey bees shake their behinds to communicate the location of high-value flower patches to one another, a form of signaling that scientists refer to as... more
Buzz off, honey industry: National parks shouldn't be milked for money  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Among the vast number of native species damaged by the recent bushfire crisis, we must not forget native pollinators. These animals, mainly insects such as native... more
Prescribed burns benefit bees  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
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Bacteria engineered to protect bees from pests and pathogens  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin report in the journal Science that they have developed a new strategy to protect honey bees from a deadly trend known as... more
Prescribed burns benefit bees  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Freshly burned longleaf pine forests have more than double the total number of bees and bee species than similar forests that have not burned in over 50 years, according to new research from North Carolina State University. more
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