Made from specially engineered infrared-sensitive yarn, which responds to changes in the temperature and humidity of a person’s skin by dynamically collapsing or expanding the structure of its fibers, the newly-developed textile shows great potential in the development of clothing systems capable of autonomously adapting to demanding environments. The human body absorbs and sheds much [...]... SCI-NEWS.COM · 7 days
Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions  nanowerk · 2 weeks
Researchers have created a fabric that can automatically regulate the amount of heat that passes through it depending on conditions. more
Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
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Scientists develop first fabric to automatically cool or insulate depending on conditions  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
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In a finding that runs counter to a common assumption in physics, researchers ran a light emitting diode (LED) with electrodes reversed in order to cool another device mere nanometers... more
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Running an LED in reverse could cool future computers  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In a finding that runs counter to a common assumption in physics, researchers at the University of Michigan ran a light emitting diode (LED) with electrodes reversed in order to... more
Wrinkles take the heat  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
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Climate change reshaping how heat moves around globe  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
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The sleep-wake cycle regulates brain interstitial fluid tau in mice and CSF tau in humans  Science Magazine · 4 weeks
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Addressing cooling needs and energy poverty targets in the Global South  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
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A yarn-based textile can switch from breathable to insulating and back again, depending on how much you sweat. more
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Materials chemists tap body heat to power 'smart garments'  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Many wearable biosensors, data transmitters and similar tech advances for personalized health monitoring have now been 'creatively miniaturized,' says a materials chemist, but they require a lot of energy, and... more
Research into outdoor and protective clothing seeks to shake off fluorochemicals  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Rain-repelling fluorochemicals used in waterproof clothing can and should be phased out as unnecessary and environmentally harmful, textile researchers argue. And yet they remain the only... more
In New York, one non-profit looks to combat textile waste  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The fashion industry generates tons of fabric waste each year, notably in New York—one of the world's shopping capitals and host twice a year to runway shows, a... more
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Invented stories, distorted facts: fake news is spreading like wildfire on the internet and is often shared on without thought, particularly on social media. In response, Fraunhofer researchers have developed a system that automatically... more
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