A new study shows that if every building in California sported 'cool' roofs by 2050, these roofs would help contribute to protecting urbanites from the consequences of dangerous heatwaves.... SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Cool roofs can help shield California's cities against heat waves  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
This summer alone, intense heat waves have been to blame for at least 11 deaths in Japan, a record-breaking 45.9-degree Celsius temperature in France, and a heat advisory... more
How roads can help cool sizzling cities  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Special permeable concrete pavement can help reduce the 'urban heat island effect' that causes cities to sizzle in the summer, according to a team of engineers. more
In the future, this electricity-free tech could help cool buildings in metropolitan areas  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Engineers designed a new system to help cool buildings in crowded metropolitan areas without consuming electricity, an important innovation as cities work... more
Our cities need more trees, but some commonly planted ones won't survive climate change  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
We need trees in our lives. This past summer, Adelaide experienced the hottest temperature ever recorded in an Australian state... more
A heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices  nanowerk · 4 days
Atomically thin heat shields could be up to 50,000 times thinner than current insulating materials in cell phones and laptops. more
Researchers build a heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and,... more
Heat shield just 10 atoms thick to protect electronic devices  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Atomically thin materials could create heat-shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact. more
Scientists take high-speed video of waves to better understand sea spray  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Waves crashing on seashores generate tiny droplets of water known as sea spray. Sea spray moves heat and water from the ocean to the atmosphere, but... more
The automobile and New York City  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
New York City's residential population, business population and number of tourists continues to grow, and our streets have become more crowded as pedestrians and motor vehicles compete for the same finite spaces. While many American sprawl... more
Patterns typically observed in water can also be found in light  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Sometimes in shallow water, a type of wave can form that is much more stable than ordinary waves. Called solitons, these phenomena emerge as solitary waves... more
GOES-17 instrument problem blamed on blocked heat pipe  SPACE NEWS · 3 weeks
A report released Aug. 1 concluded that a problem with an instrument on the GOES-17 weather satellite is likely caused... more
Turbulence meets a shock  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
This may come as a shock, if you're moving fast enough. The shock being shock waves. A balloon's 'pop' is shock waves generated by exploded bits of the balloon moving faster than the speed of sound. Supersonic planes generate a... more
Hoses, ice packs help tame Tokyo heat before the Olympics  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
The heat is on for organizers of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Several days after marking one year to go before the opening ceremony, the notorious Tokyo heat kicked... more
Why Does Mint Make Your Mouth Feel Cool?  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 weeks
If you nibble on a mint leaf, you might notice that it makes your mouth feel cool. That's because mint, much like chili peppers, is a biochemical success story — for plants,... more
A laser for penetrating waves  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The Landau-level laser is an exciting concept for an unusual radiation source. It could efficiently generate so-called terahertz waves, which can be used to penetrate materials, with possible applications in data transmission. So far, however, nearly all attempts... more
New approach could make HVAC heat exchangers five times more efficient  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Researchers from Tsinghua University and Brown University have discovered a simple way to give a major boost to turbulent heat exchange, a method of heat transport... more
Why science needs the humanities to solve climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Large wildfires in the Arctic and intense heat waves in Europe are just the latest evidence that climate change is becoming the defining event of our time. Unlike other periods... more
Livable cities rankings do citizens a disservice by trying to quantify urban life  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
At last count, there were over 500 rankings that pit cities around the world against each other: from the most intricately measured... more
29 US states and cities sue Trump over climate protections  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A coalition of 22 US states and seven cities on Tuesday sued President Donald Trump's administration to block it from easing restrictions on coal-burning power plants. more
Dangerous heat grips wide stretch of the South and Midwest  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Forecasters are warning of scorching heat across a wide stretch of the U.S. South and Midwest, where the heat index will feel as high as 117 degrees (47... more
How the 5 riskiest U.S. cities for coastal flooding are preparing for rising tides  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 weeks
The five U.S. cities most at risk of coastal flooding from rising sea levels are in various stages of preparedness. more
Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water... more
Mobile forests could help cities cope with climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Cities across Europe are trialling schemes such as roof gardens and 'mobile forests' to embed more nature into urban areas in an effort to protect their citizens from climate change... more
California roadkill report maps costs, hot spots and solutions  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
California drivers lost about $232 million to costs associated with wildlife-vehicle conflicts in 2018 and over $1 billion since 2015, according to the sixth annual Wildlife Vehicle Conflict report from... more
New evidence highlights growing urban water crisis  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
New research has found that in 15 major cities in the global south, almost half of all households lack access to piped utility water, affecting more than 50 million people. Access is lowest in... more
Research could protect cities in active earthquake zones  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
A study from the University of Toronto Mississauga reveals new clues about an earthquake that rocked Argentina's San Juan province in the 1950s. The results add important data about one of the... more
Scientists cook up new recipes for taking salt out of seawater  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
As populations boom and chronic droughts persist, coastal cities like Carlsbad in Southern California have increasingly turned to ocean desalination to supplement a dwindling fresh water... more
Europe heat wave breaks Belgian record, mercury to rise more  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Europeans cooled off in public fountains Wednesday as a new heat wave spread across parts of the continent and is already breaking records. more
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