A new study, published in the journal Animal Welfare, shows that some people are particularly good at identifying feline emotions from cats’ faces; women are more successful at this task than men, and younger participants more successful than older, as are participants with professional feline (e.g. veterinary) experience. You can visit a dedicated website where you [...]... SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Medical News Today: Only 'cat whisperers' can read felines' facial expressions  MNT · 7 days
New research finds that most people are unable to read cats' facial expressions, apart from a small group of so-called cat whisperers. more
Only 'cat whisperers' can read felines' facial expressions  MNT · 7 days
New research finds that most people are unable to read cats' facial expressions, apart from a small group of so-called cat whisperers. more
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Women and those with veterinary experience were better at recognizing cats' expressions -- even those who reported no strong attachment to cats. The study involved more than 6,300 people from... more
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Medical News Today: Illiteracy may triple dementia risk  MNT · 4 weeks
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‘Habsburg Jaw’ Was Result of Inbreeding, New Research Confirms  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A facial condition called the ‘Habsburg jaw’ (mandibular prognathism) owes its name to its high prevalence in the... more
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