Engineers have devised a new, non-invasive way to monitor the stiffness of single living cells, using acoustic waves. Their technique could be used to study many biological phenomena, such as cell division, programmed cell death or metastasis.... SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Acoustic waves can monitor stiffness of living cells  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
MIT engineers have devised a new, noninvasive way to measure the stiffness of living cells using acoustic waves. Their technique allows them to monitor single cells over several generations and investigate how... more
New technique uses acoustic waves to measure the stiffness of living cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
MIT engineers have devised a new, noninvasive way to measure the stiffness of living cells using acoustic waves. Their technique allows them to monitor... more
Acoustic waves can monitor stiffness of living cells  nanowerk · 6 days
Technique sheds light on cells? health and development; may be useful for precision medicine. more
Acoustic waves can monitor stiffness of living cells  MIT · 7 days
Technique sheds light on cells’ health and development; may be useful for precision medicine. more
Measuring forces of living cells and microorganisms  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Forces exerted by a living cell or a microorganism are tiny, often no larger than a few nanonewtons. For comparison, one nanonewton is the weight of one part in a billion of a typical... more
MH370: New underwater sound wave analysis suggests alternative travel route and new impact locations  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Motivated by a desire to help find Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, which is believed to have crashed into the southern... more
How breast tissue stiffening promotes breast cancer development  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
By examining how mammary cells respond in a stiffness-changing hydrogel, researchers discovered that several pathways work together to signal breast cells to turn cancerous. The work could inspire new approaches to treating... more
Researchers provide insight into how breast tissue stiffening promotes cancer development  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
A study provides new insight into how the stiffening of breast tissue plays a role in breast cancer development. By examining how mammary cells respond in... more
Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Florida State University researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves—waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments... more
Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves -- waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments of... more
Aggregated social amoebae need physical contact rather than chemical signals for motivation  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Collective cell migration, in which groups of cells move together with a common purpose, is important for processes ranging from wound healing to tumor... more
Study: How cells and tissues maintain their shape  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Scientists have long pondered how the body's tissues maintain their stiffness in the face of growth, injury, and other forces. In a new study, Yale researchers have described this mysterious process, which... more
Do endangered woods make better guitars?  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Researchers have tested the sounds made by six different acoustic guitars in a study addressing the effects of the type of wood used in their construction. Some of the woods used for guitar backs are revered... more
Canbiola announces launch of revolutionary Sustained Acoustic Medicine wellness solution  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Canbiola, Inc. a developer, manufacturer and seller of a variety of Cannabidiol based products such as oils, creams, moisturizers, chews, isolate, gel caps, concentrate and water, announced today... more
Earthquake with magnitude 7.5 in Indonesia: An unusual and steady speed  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Earthquakes happen when rocks on either side of a tectonic fault shift suddenly in opposite directions. Two main seismic waves that carry shaking out of a... more
White-tailed deer shape acoustic properties of their forest habitat  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
White-tailed deer feeding habits shape the acoustic properties of their forest habitat, potentially affecting the vocal communication of understory-dwelling songbirds and other species, according to a study published February 13,... more
Next-generation optics in just two minutes of cooking time  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Optical circuits are set to revolutionize the performance of many devices. Not only are they 10 to 100 times faster than electronic circuits, but they also consume a lot less... more
Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers have developed new metasurfaces for the arbitrary manipulation of reflected waves, essentially breaking classical reflection law to engineer it at will. more
Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Measurements of gravitational waves from approximately 50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate about how quickly our universe is expanding, according to new findings. more
High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed  nanowerk · 4 days
Researchers introduce a new time-resolved microscopy method that allows them to monitor the trajectories of fast-moving charged particles at unprecedented rates. more
Engineered metasurfaces reflect waves in unusual directions  nanowerk · 2 days
New metasurfaces can reflect light or sound waves into any desired direction -- or even split energy into more than one. more
On the origin of B1 cells  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
A new study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology: researchers report that distinct progenitor cells are not required for the development of B1 cells. Instead, the team's experiments show that a B1-typical B-cell receptor can... more
How proteins become embedded in a cell membrane  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Many proteins with important biological functions are embedded in a biomembrane in the cells of humans and other living organisms. But how do they get in there in the first place? Researchers... more
How proteins become embedded in a cell membrane  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Many proteins with important biological functions are embedded in a biomembrane in the cells of humans and other living organisms. But how do they get in there in the first place? Researchers... more
Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Measurements of gravitational waves from approximately 50 binary neutron stars over the next decade will definitively resolve an intense debate about how quickly our universe is expanding, according to findings from an international team that includes... more
On the origin of B1 cells  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new MDC study may resolve a decades-old debate in immunology. A team led by Professor Klaus Rajewsky reports in Science that distinct progenitor cells are not required for the development of B1 cells. Instead, the... more
Expanding pill could be used to monitor stomach conditions for up to one month  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Engineers have developed a Jell-O-like pill that quickly expands on reaching the stomach and uses an embedded sensor to monitor... more
Customizing the Cellular Microenvironment to Improve Physiological Relevance
NEWS MEDICAL
Parents don't pick favorites, at least if you're a Magellanic penguin
PHYS.ORG
Kepler's final image
PHYS.ORG
We've discovered the world's largest drum – and it's in space
PHYS.ORG
SCHILLER offers free Epicardio heart simulator trial
NEWS MEDICAL
Aggregated social amoebae need physical contact rather than chemical signals for motivation
PHYS.ORG
How black soldier fly larvae can demolish a pizza so fast
SCIENCE-NEWS
The Truth About E-cigarettes: Quit Smoking this World Cancer Day
NEWS MEDICAL
I Am and I Will: The Steps We Can All Take This World Cancer Day
NEWS MEDICAL
New type of map connects the dots in cellular reprogramming
PHYS.ORG
Fresh