A survey of over six thousand sub-Saharan households shows an estimated 39% experience severely unreliable access to food. In addition, 49% have inadequate diversity in their diet, putting them at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The study, published in Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, is among the largest of its kind—and also the first to correlate food access and nutrition to time of year, as well as demographic, agricultural, ecological and economic factors.... PHYS.ORG · 2 months
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Early modern humans cooked starchy food in South Africa, 170,000 years ago  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
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