Gravity
Interstellar comet 2I/Borisov swings past sun  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
When astronomers see something in the universe that at first glance seems like one-of-a-kind, it's bound to stir up a lot of excitement and attention. Enter comet 2I/Borisov. This mysterious visitor from the depths of space... more
New technology improves gravitational wave detectors by cutting quantum noise  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Physicists have successfully developed a new instrument that significantly reduces quantum-level noise that has thus far limited experiments' ability to spot gravitational waves. Collisions between massive black holes... more
New Instrument Extends LIGO’s Reach  ASTRO WATCH · 3 days
Just a year ago, the National Science Foundation-funded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, was picking up whispers of gravitational waves every month or so. Now,... more
Study unveils new nonlinear dynamics of spinning bosonic stars  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Although researchers have been studying dark matter and trying to observe it, its nature is a longstanding scientific mystery. The standard cosmological model suggests that approximately one-quarter of cosmological energy... more
ALMA spots most distant dusty galaxy hidden in plain sight  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Astronomers have spotted the light of a massive galaxy seen only 970 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy, called MAMBO-9, is the most distant dusty star-forming... more
Astronomers spot most distant dusty galaxy hidden in plain sight  nanowerk · 4 days
Astronomers have spotted the light of a massive galaxy seen only 970 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy, called MAMBO-9, is the most distant dusty star-forming... more
ALMA spots most distant dusty galaxy hidden in plain sight  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have spotted the light of a massive galaxy seen only 970 million years after the Big Bang. This galaxy, called... more
Life of a foam  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A fine coffee froth does not last forever. The bubbles that make the milk light and creamy are eventually torn apart by the pull of gravity. But there is a place where foams have a more stable life—in the weightless... more
SpaceX Dragon heads to space station with NASA science  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station after launching at 12:29 p.m. EST today (Dec. 5). Dragon will deliver more than 5,700 pounds... more
Life of a foam  ESA · 1 week
A fine coffee froth does not last forever. The bubbles that make the milk light and creamy are eventually torn apart by the pull of gravity. But there... more
Mice in space: NASA's latest experiment  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Scientists are sending mighty mice to space, but rather than being gym rats, their strength was enhanced through genetic experimentation in the hopes of preventing human astronauts from experiencing muscle loss in microgravity. more
New instrument extends LIGO's reach  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Just a year ago, the National Science Foundation-funded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, was picking up whispers of gravitational waves every month or so. Now, a new addition to the system is enabling the instruments to detect... more
Tech startups gravitate toward cities with strong social networks, study finds  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The presence of technology startups can drive economic growth for their home cities. So how can cities better appeal to entrepreneurs? A new study from the... more
Tech startups gravitate toward cities with strong social networks, study finds  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
The presence of technology startups can drive economic growth for their home cities. So how can cities better appeal to entrepreneurs? A new study shows the... more
Mars: We may have solved the mystery of how its landslides form  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Some landslides on Mars seem to defy an important law of physics. "Long, runout landslides" are formed by huge volumes of rock and soil... more
Satellite Broken? Smart Satellites to the Rescue  ASTRO WATCH · 2 weeks
When satellites break, which is surprisingly often, there isn't much you can do about them. They become expensive and dangerous flotsam, orbiting... more
Space Travel Can Make the Gut Leaky  ASTRO WATCH · 2 weeks
Bacteria, fungi, and viruses can enter our gut through the food we eat. Fortunately, the epithelial cells that line our intestines serve... more
Leaky gut and space flight – the mechanism revealed  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A new study on the effects of simulated microgravity, the condition that astronauts face in space, interferes with the epithelial barrier of the intestine, and the effect persists even after... more
Spaceflight Can Cause Sustained Defect in Epithelial Barrier Function, New Study Shows  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Epithelial cells that line our intestines serve as a robust barrier to invasion by viruses, bacteria and exposure to ingested agents. A new study,... more
Novel out-of-this-world approach to cancer research  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 weeks
Australia's first space research mission to the International Space Station will attempt to establish how some of the most aggressive cancer cells behave in a zero-gravity environment. more
A fifth fundamental force could really exist, but we haven't found it yet  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
The universe is governed by four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism and the strong and weak nuclear forces. These forces drive the motion... more
Space travel can make the gut leaky  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Bacteria, fungi, and viruses can enter our gut through the food we eat. Fortunately, the epithelial cells that line our intestines serve as a robust barrier to prevent these microorganisms from invading the rest... more
European researchers on weightless parabolic flight  ESA · 3 weeks
What do you get if you put 40 researchers, 12 technologically advanced experiments in an aircraft and fly at maximum thrust in repeated 50°... more
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could find more of Earth's transient moons  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
It is a well-known astronomical convention that Earth has only one natural satellite, which is known (somewhat uncreatively) as "the moon." However, astronomers have... more
How LISA pathfinder detected dozens of 'comet crumbs'  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
LISA Pathfinder, a mission led by ESA (the European Space Agency) that included NASA contributions, successfully demonstrated technologies needed to build a future space-based gravitational wave observatory, a tool for detecting ripples... more
How to observe a 'black hole symphony' using gravitational wave astronomy  nanowerk · 4 weeks
New research by astrophysicists presents a compelling roadmap for capturing intermediate-mass black hole activity. more
How to observe a 'black hole symphony' using gravitational wave astronomy  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Shrouded in mystery since their discovery, the phenomenon of black holes continues to be one of the most mind-boggling enigmas in our universe. more
Neptune’s Moons Naiad and Thalassa Perform ‘Dance of Avoidance’  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 weeks
A new study, published in the journal Icarus, shows that Naiad and Thalassa, two innermost moons of Neptune,... more
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Mars: We may have solved the mystery of how its landslides form
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