Evolution
What the vibrant pigments of bird feathers can teach us about how evolution works  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
Biologists show that evolution is driven by dependency on other species within ecological communities - testing a long-held idea of... more
What the vibrant pigments of bird feathers can teach us about how evolution works  PHYS.ORG · 6 hours
A University of Arizona-led research team has shown that evolution is driven by species interaction within a community. more
An aerobic eukaryotic parasite with functional mitochondria that likely lacks a mitochondrial genome  Science Magazine · 8 hours
Dinoflagellates are microbial eukaryotes that have exceptionally large nuclear genomes; however, their organelle genomes are small and fragmented and contain fewer genes... more
Exceptional preservation of mid-Cretaceous marine arthropods and the evolution of novel forms via heterochrony  Science Magazine · 8 hours
Evolutionary origins of novel forms are often obscure because early and transitional fossils tend to be rare, poorly preserved, or... more
Evolution of metabolic novelty: A trichome-expressed invertase creates specialized metabolic diversity in wild tomato  Science Magazine · 8 hours
Plants produce a myriad of taxonomically restricted specialized metabolites. This diversity—and our ability to correlate genotype with phenotype—makes the evolution... more
Tomato, tomat-oh!—understanding evolution to reduce pesticide use  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Although pesticides are a standard part of crop production, Michigan State University researchers believe pesticide use could be reduced by taking cues from wild plants. more
'Beautiful Nightmare' Crab Sported Lobster Shell, Shrimp Mouth and Soccer Ball Eyes  LIVE SCIENCE · 8 hours
An ancient crab that lived during the dinosaur age was so strange, paleontologists are calling it the platypus of the crab world. more
A Neanderthal tooth discovered in Serbia reveals human migration history  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
In 2015, our Serbian-Canadian archaeological research team was working at a cave site named Pešturina, in Eastern Serbia, where we had found thousands of stone tools and animal... more
Simple sea anemones not so simple after all  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
New research on tube anemones is challenging everything that evolutionary biologists thought they knew about sea animal genetics. The mitochondrial DNA of the tube anemone, or Ceriantharia, is a real head scratcher,... more
See beautiful fossils from top Cambrian sites around the world  SCIENCE-NEWS · 15 hours
Troves of Cambrian fossils are known at more than 50 places around the world. Here are five standout spots. more
Zoologists discover two new bird species in Indonesia  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with partners from Halu Oleo University (UHO) and Operation Wallacea, have discovered two beautiful new bird species in the Wakatobi Archipelago of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Details of... more
How 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists have discovered. more
Study unravels mystery of antimicrobial frog secretions  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Japanese scientists have identified the molecular mechanism that gives the skin secretions of a species of frog effective antimicrobial properties. Unraveling the molecular mechanism that facilitates antimicrobial activity of these peptides can help us... more
Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of Bacteroides... more
Study: Why unique finches keep their heads of many colors  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
There appears to be an underlying selection mechanism at work among Gouldian Finches—a mechanism that allows this species to produce and maintain individuals with red heads, black heads,... more
Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
MIT researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of... more
Coelacanth Reveals Secrets of Vertebrate Skull Evolution  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
A new study into one of the world’s oldest types of fish, the coelacanth, illuminates for the first time the development of... more
One million species risk extinction due to humans: Draft UN report  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Up to one million species face extinction due to human influence, according to a draft UN report obtained by AFP that painstakingly catalogues how humanity has... more
Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite pathways in forest recovery  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The composition of regrowing wet and dry tropical forests follow opposite pathways while these forests age. This fact has significant consequences for forest restoration initiatives. The... more
A new eye on the cosmos  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
How do galaxies form and evolve? And how do central supermassive black holes form in galaxies and influence their hosts? Those are two of the big questions that Tufts astronomers hope to answer when they start... more
Scientists discover how 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists... more
Family quarrels in seeds reveal the ways parents and offspring sometimes evolve in conflicting directions  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
It's spring, finally—and in the tree branches a battle is brewing. A robin returns to her nest with... more
Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun.... more
Reducing energy required to convert CO2 waste into valuable resources  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Surplus industrial carbon dioxide creates an opportunity to convert waste into a valuable commodity. Excess CO2 can be a feedstock for chemicals typically derived from fossil fuels, but... more
Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun.... more
Rewriting the textbook on fossil fuels: New technologies help unravel nature's methane recipes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Experts say scientific understanding of deep hydrocarbons has been transformed, with new insights gained into the sources of energy that could have... more
Extinction Rebellion: disruption and arrests can bring social change  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Extinction Rebellion burst onto everybody's screens with disruptions and mass arrests across the UK and around the world, in protest against government inaction on climate change. Radical disruptions have been... more
To save life on Earth, here's the $100 billion-a-year solution  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
There have been five mass extinctions in the history of the Earth. But in the 21st century, scientists now estimate that society must urgently come to grips this... more
Why Do Our Fingernails Keep Growing Until the Day We Die?  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
You may give them little thought beyond when to trim them or which nail color to apply. But the humble nail laid the groundwork for our... more
Costa Rica bets on ending fossil fuel use by 2050  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Eric Orlich and his wife Gioconda Rojas own two electric vehicles, which they charge at home in the garage thanks to solar panels on their roof. more
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. But researchers have discovered the dolphins actually... more
Combinatorial optimization by simulating adiabatic bifurcations in nonlinear Hamiltonian systems  Science Magazine · 5 days
Combinatorial optimization problems are ubiquitous but difficult to solve. Hardware devices for these problems have recently been developed by various approaches, including quantum computers. Inspired by recently proposed... more
MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to... more
Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil is something of a mystery. It was thought to be quite solitary, with little social structure that would require communication.... more
How superstitions spread  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Superstitious beliefs may seem irrational, but they can nevertheless catch on in a society. Using an evolutionary approach to studying the emergence of coordinated behaviors, biologists showed how a jumble of individual beliefs, including superstitions, can coalesce into an accepted... more
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
An ancient and rare beetle fossil is the oldest example of a social relationship between two animal species. more
Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
The American Bumblebee - a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario - is critically endangered, according to a new study. The finding found the native North American species, Bombus pensylvanicus, is... more
Study: Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The iconic "death roll" of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study published in Ethology, Ecology & Evolution and coauthored... more
Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The American Bumblebee—a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario—is critically endangered, according to a new study led by York University. more
Folding faults and seismic risk in the Kunlun range, Northwest Tibet  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The tectonic deformation and growth pattern of the western Kunlun, which is the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, are not currently well understood. The surface... more
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull... more
The quest to save the banana from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Panama disease, an infection that ravages banana plants, has been sweeping across Asia, Australia, the Middle East and Africa. The impact has been devastating. In the Philippines alone, losses have totalled US$400m.... more
New Dinosaur Species Uncovered in Mongolia  SCI-NEWS.COM · 7 days
Paleontologists in Mongolia have discovered a new species of hadrosauroid dinosaur that roamed what is now the Gobi Desert approximately 90 million years ago.... more
Turning an old enemy into a helpful friend  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Half our genome is basically foreign, derived from viruses. Obviously, the invasion of such foreign elements can deregulate critical biological processes, and lead to disease. This is why animals, including humans have... more
Planck reveals link between active galaxies and their dark matter environment  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Scientists have used the tiny distortions imprinted on the cosmic microwave background by the gravity of matter throughout the universe, recorded by ESA's Planck satellite, to... more
Research provides insights into molecular gas in the massive spiral galaxy NGC 5908  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
In a recently published research, which is part of a broader observational campaign focused on studying massive spiral galaxies, astronomers have investigated... more
Scientists unearth 220 million-year-old dinosaur fossils in Argentina  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A site containing the 220-million-year-old fossilised remains of nearly a dozen dinosaurs has been discovered in western Argentina, researchers said Wednesday. more
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear,... more
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Almost 100 million years ago, a tiny and misfortunate beetle died after wandering into a sticky glob of resin leaking from a tree in a region near present-day Southeast Asia.... more
Genetics behind the evolution of flightless birds  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Based on the analysis of the genomes of more than a dozen flightless birds, including an extinct moa, researchers found that while different species show wide variety in the protein-coding portions of their genome,... more
Is one toe really better than three? How horse' legs evolved for travel rather than speed  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Palaeobiologists have uncovered new evidence that suggests that horses' legs have adapted over time to be... more
Volcanic Eruptions Caused End-Permian Extinction, New Evidence Confirms  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
An international team of paleontologists from China and the United States has found high levels of mercury in the end-Permian... more
Coelacanth reveals new insights into skull evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
An international team of researchers presents the first observations of the development of the skull and brain in the living coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae. Their study provides new insights into the biology of this iconic... more
Urine salts elucidate Early Neolithic animal management at Asıklı Höyük, Turkey  Science Magazine · 1 week
The process of sheep and goat (caprine) domestication began by 9000 to 8000 BCE in Southwest Asia. The early Neolithic site at Asıklı Höyük in central... more
Meet Gobihadros, a new species of Mongolian hadrosaur  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The complete skeletal remains of a new species of Mongolian dinosaur fill in a gap in the evolution of hadrosaurs, according to a study released April 17, 2019 in the open-access journal... more
Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study into one of the world's oldest types of fish, Coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the... more
Is one toe really better than three? How horse' legs evolved for travel rather than speed  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Palaeobiologists from the University of Bristol and Howard University have uncovered new evidence that suggests that... more
Small fossils with big applications: BP Gulf of Mexico time scale  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Geologic time scales are critical to understanding the timing, duration, and connection of geologic events. They are not static, and can be improved with research, integration,... more
Asian elephant outlives stegodon—advantage due to diverse diet  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Together with their Chinese colleagues, Senckenberg scientists studied the feeding habits of the Asian elephant and its extinct relative, the stegodon, during the Pleistocene. They reached the conclusion that the Asian elephant... more
Rhinos, Gomphotheres, Camels, Horses, Antelopes and Alligators Lived in Ancient ‘Texas Serengeti’  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Dr. Steven May, a paleontology research associate at the University of Texas at Austin, has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from... more
Cometary Surprise Found Inside Meteorite  ASTRO WATCH · 1 week
An ancient sliver of the building blocks from which comets formed was discovered encased inside a meteorite like an insect in amber by a Carnegie-led research... more
When it comes to learning, what's better: The carrot or the stick?  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Does the potential to win or lose money influence the confidence one has in one's own decisions? Researchers investigated confidence bias in a learning... more
Climate change threatens endangered sparrows  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new study finds that some sparrow species will likely go extinct within the century due to climate change. more
Climate change threatens endangered sparrows  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that some sparrow species will go extinct within the century due to climate change. more
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators... more
New evidence suggests volcanoes caused biggest mass extinction ever  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth. The extinction 252 million years... more
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators... more
World's Rarest Giant Turtle Loses Last Known Female, All But Guaranteeing Extinction  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 week
The world's last known female Yangtze giant softshell turtle died one day after a failed artificial insemination in China. more
New evidence suggests volcanoes caused biggest mass extinction ever  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth. more
The history of humanity in your face  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our... more
Power to the people: How everyday acts of defiance can shape and change markets  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Subtle, hidden and everyday acts of resistance and defiance by people with limited resources could have an impact on markets... more
Need for social skills helped shape modern human face  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The modern human face is distinctively different to that of our near relatives and now researchers believe its evolution may have been partly driven by our need for good social... more
To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Despite evolution driving a wide variety of differences, many plants function the same way. Now a new study has revealed the different genetic strategies various flowering plant species... more
Of bunyips and other beasts: Living memories of long-extinct creatures in art and stories  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
On many continents during the last ice age, typically from about 50,000 to 12,000 years ago, species of megafauna that... more
Paleontologists Find Exquisitely-Preserved Dinosaur Skin Traces  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Several footprints and exquisitely-preserved skin impressions made by a small theropod dinosaur approximately 120 million years ago (Aptian age of the Early Cretaceous epoch)... more
Breezing through the space environment of Barnard's Star b  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The closest exoplanet to us, if we include only single stars like the Sun, is the planet around Barnard's Star, Barnard's Star-b ("BSb"). (The planet Promixa Centauri-b is closer, but... more
Quantum localization bounds Trotter errors in digital quantum simulation  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
A fundamental challenge in digital quantum simulation (DQS) is the control of an inherent error, which appears when discretizing the time evolution of a quantum many-body system as a sequence... more
Depression-Era Workers Found Strange Fossilized Beasts in 'Texas Serengeti'  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
About 12 million years ago, antelopes with slingshot-like horns and beasts that weren't quite elephants but that had long trunks and tusks tramped across the "Texas Serengeti" searching for food... more
Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. But this evolution is compromised if caterpillars attack the plant at the same time. As bees pollinate them less effectively, the plants... more
Evolutionary biologists demonstrate that male fruit flies manipulate their female partners  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests. Researchers from Münster (Germany) and Lausanne (Switzerland) now report that male flies... more
Fossils of Silurian Sea Cucumber Found in UK  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
An international team of paleontologists has found the remains of an extinct sea cucumber in 430 million-year-old (Silurian period) fossil-rich... more
Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Research scientists have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage. The family tree of sooglossid... more
A new species of ancient human and real-time evolutionary changes in flowering plants  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
The ancient humans also known as the “hobbit” people (Homo floresiensis) might have company in their small stature with the discovery of... more
Rapid plant evolution driven by the interaction of pollination and herbivory  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Pollination and herbivory are both key drivers of plant diversity but are traditionally studied in isolation from each other. We investigated real-time evolutionary changes in plant... more
Reproduction: How male flies enforce their interests  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests. Researchers have now found out: male flies manipulate their partners primarily in order to increase their own chances in reproductive... more
NeanderthalsExtinctionSentienceDinosaurs
A Neanderthal tooth discovered in Serbia reveals human migration history
PHYS.ORG
To save life on Earth, here's the $100 billion-a-year solution
PHYS.ORG
New carbon dioxide capture technology is not the magic bullet against climate change
PHYS.ORG
These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years
PHYS.ORG
Attention skills in a nonhuman cooperative breeding species
PHYS.ORG
New species of early human found in the Philippines
PHYS.ORG
Evolution: How the theory is inspiring a new way of understanding language
PHYS.ORG
Accelerating electrocatalyst discovery
PHYS.ORG
Cool Earth theory sheds more light on diamonds
PHYS.ORG
'Scuba-diving' lizard can stay underwater for 16 minutes
PHYS.ORG
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