Evolution
'Treasure trove' of dinosaur footprints found in southern England  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
More than 85 well-preserved dinosaur footprints—made by at least seven different species—have been uncovered in East Sussex, representing the most diverse and detailed collection of these trace fossils from the... more
A new neptune-size exoplanet  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The remarkable exoplanet discoveries made by the Kepler and K2 missions have enabled astronomers to begin to piece together the history of the Earth and to understand how and why it differs from its diverse exoplanetary cousins. Two still outstanding... more
Scientists Try to Save Woolly Monkeys from Extinction … by Training Them to Be Wild Again  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 days
Colombian researchers hope to revive an endangered species by rehabilitating monkeys confiscated from smugglers. The captive... more
California mandates 100-percent zero-emission bus fleet  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
California moved Friday to eliminate fossil fuels from its fleet of 12,000 transit buses, enacting a first-in-the-nation mandate that will vastly increase the number of electric buses on the road. more
Leo DiCaprio's Rumored Plan to Buy a Dinosaur Duo Has Paleontologists Upset  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
Leonardo DiCaprio is rumored to be in the market for a $2.5 million dinosaur duo: a meat-eating Allosaurus mother and babe, according to Page... more
Mention of 'fossil fuels' cut from videos at UN climate talks  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Videos produced by environmental groups to be shown to thousands of participants in a major UN climate summit were banned by organisers for mentioning fossil fuels,... more
Internal strain tunes electronic correlations on the nanoscale  Science Magazine · 3 days
In conventional metals, charge carriers basically move freely. In correlated electron materials, however, the electrons may become localized because of strong Coulomb interactions, resulting in an insulating state. Despite considerable progress in... more
Mammalian keratin genes and adaptation to living on land or sea  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Scientists have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins. more
On the horizon: Looking ahead for global conservation  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Every year for the last decade, an expert team of horizon scanners, science communicators and researchers have identified the top emerging issues in global conservation. This year's team included Fauna & Flora... more
Orangutans can communicate about the past just like humans, new research finds  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The evolution of language converted a defenceless naked ape into a world-dominating force. It fundamentally transformed how humans transmit information and knowledge. A large... more
Tale of two trees: New web tool estimates gene trees with ease  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Gene trees, much like family trees, trace the lineage of a particular gene from its deep ancestral roots to its still-growing branches. By comparing... more
Horned dinosaur Crittendenceratops discovered in Arizona  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Palentologists are announcing a new dinosaur discovery in the southwest United States. Crittendenceratops krzyzanowskii is a new ceratopsid (horned) dinosaur from 73-million-year-old (Late Cretaceous) rocks in southern Arizona. It is one of the few dinosaurs named... more
Study unearths sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate... more
Neanderthal genes give clues to human brain evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
A distinctive feature of modern humans is our round (globular) skulls and brains. Researchers report that present-day humans who carry particular Neanderthal DNA fragments have heads that are slightly less rounded, revealing... more
High-affinity allergen-specific human antibodies cloned from single IgE B cell transcriptomes  Science Magazine · 4 days
Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies protect against helminth infections but can also cause life-threatening allergic reactions. Despite their role in human health, the cells that produce these... more
Multiproxy evidence highlights a complex evolutionary legacy of maize in South America  Science Magazine · 4 days
Domesticated maize evolved from wild teosinte under human influences in Mexico beginning around 9000 years before the present (yr B.P.), traversed Central America by... more
Evolution of a highly active and enantiospecific metalloenzyme from short peptides  Science Magazine · 4 days
Primordial sequence signatures in modern proteins imply ancestral origins tracing back to simple peptides. Although short peptides seldom adopt unique folds, metal ions might have templated... more
Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviors towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviors, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate... more
Early animals: Death near the shoreline, not life on land  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils -- the tracks and trails left by ancient animals --... more
Death near the shoreline, not life on land  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Our understanding of when the very first animals started living on land is helped by identifying trace fossils—the tracks and trails left by ancient animals—in sedimentary rocks that were deposited on the... more
Neuroscientists uncover sensory switches controlling infanticide and parental behavior  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Many species of mammals have evolved what appear to be paradoxical behaviours towards their young. Like humans, most exhibit nurturing, protective behaviours, and in some circumstances even act as surrogate... more
Nations 'face extinction' without instant climate action  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Dozens of nations threatened with catastrophe from unchecked climate change warned Thursday they "face extinction" without immediate action to rein in mankind's emissions, as UN climate talks limped towards their conclusion. more
Marine mammal experts gather to identify solutions to save threatened dolphins and porpoises  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Thirty-seven experts from 14 countries are gathering at the Cistercian Monastery in Heilsbronn—Nuremberg from December 14 to 18 to discuss conservation options... more
Neandertal genes shed light on unique aspects of the modern human brain  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A characteristic feature of modern humans is the unusually round skull and brain, in contrast to the elongated shape seen in other human species.... more
Black Dwarf Stars: The (Theoretical) End of Stellar Evolution  SPACE.COM · 4 days
A black dwarf is all that is left after a white dwarf star burns off all of its heat, but retains its mass. more
Huge Marsupial Lion Terrorized Ancient Australia, Sat Adorably on Its Tail  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
The marsupial lion has long mystified scientists. But the recent discovery of more of its fossils, including a nearly complete skeleton of the extinct beast, has... more
Professor models system using baking soda filled capsules to capture CO2 emissions  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Coal and natural gas represent the majority of the US energy supply. Even with pollution controls, burning these fossil fuels for energy releases a... more
Cardinals living in adjacent deserts are sharply distinct in genetics and song  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
New research suggests that populations of the Northern Cardinal —one of the most ubiquitous backyard birds in the United States— are undergoing speciation in... more
First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia's extinct 'marsupial lion'  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Thyalacoleo carnifex, the 'marsupial lion' of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a new... more
First-ever look at complete skeleton of Thylacoleo, Australia's extinct 'marsupial lion'  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Thyalacoleo carnifex, the "marsupial lion" of Pleistocene Australia, was an adept hunter that got around with the help of a strong tail, according to a study... more
Multicomponent new particle formation from sulfuric acid, ammonia, and biogenic vapors  Science Magazine · 5 days
A major fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles, which affect both air quality and climate, form from gaseous precursors in the atmosphere. Highly oxygenated organic molecules (HOMs),... more
Chemical engineers advance olefins production through computational modeling  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Olefins are simple compounds of hydrogen and carbon but represent the building blocks of chemistry, and are vital for the synthesis of materials from polymers and plastics to petrochemicals. However, olefin production... more
Researchers reverse engineer way pine trees produce green chemicals worth billions  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Researchers have reverse engineered the way a pine tree produces a resin, which could serve as an environmentally friendly alternative to a range of fossil-fuel based... more
Researchers reverse engineer way pine trees produce green chemicals worth billions  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Washington State University researchers have reverse engineered the way a pine tree produces a resin, which could serve as an environmentally friendly alternative to a range... more
Teenage sexting: We're letting young people down by not talking about it  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Sexting among young people has become a hotly debated topic over the past few years. Over the same period, our understanding of sexting has... more
Five reasons why 2018 was a big year for palaeontology  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A lot happened in the world of palaeontology in 2018. Some of the big events included some major fossil finds, a new understanding of our reptile ancestors and... more
Algorithms to locate centrioles in the cell  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Investigators from the Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Group at the University of Extremadura are studying signaling mediated by a pathway known as planar cell polarity (PCP), which regulates the coordinated orientation of cells during organogenesis,... more
Radical environmentalists are fighting climate change – so why are they persecuted?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Climate change, deforestation, widespread pollution and the sixth mass extinction of biodiversity all define living in our world today – an era that has... more
Fossils key to fulfilling Darwin's 160-year-old prediction  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A new study by researchers at the University of Salford has shown that fossils are likely to be key to fulfilling a prediction made by Charles Darwin more than 160 years ago. more
Transformed: The plant whose sex life fascinated Charles Darwin  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers have genetically transformed the Common Primrose (Primula vulgaris) for the first time in a development that could shed light on one of the plant world's most renowned reproductive systems. more
A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island, Texas  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry in Texas -- providing opportunities for additional conservation... more
Can social interactions affect spread of disease?  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Most real-world systems, such as biological, social, and economic schemes evolve constantly. The dynamics of such systems are characterized by significantly enhanced activity levels over short periods of time (or "bursts") followed by long... more
Transformed: the plant whose sex life fascinated Charles Darwin  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers have genetically transformed the Common Primrose (Primula vulgaris) for the first time in a development that could shed light on one of the plant world's most renowned reproductive systems. more
Calculated risk: Crickets draw mates, lethal parasites with upbeat call  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Males of many animal species have evolved extravagant signals to attract mates, but those signals also risk exposing males to predators and parasites. Researchers have generally hypothesized that... more
Sea sponge study offers clues to how life adapts to harsh environments  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A new study of modern sea sponges is beginning to tell us how early life forms such as sea sponges found ways to survive... more
A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Red wolves, once nearly extinct, again teeter on the abyss. New research finds red wolf ancestry on Galveston Island—providing opportunities for additional conservation action and difficult... more
These 'useless' quirks of evolution are actually evidence for the theory  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Evolution is a fascinating field but can be rife with misunderstanding. One misconception is that evolution has some innate sense of direction or purpose. In reality,... more
Climate change, models, mimics and predators: A complicated relationship  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Climate change as a disruptive force has been studied in terms of its effects on direct interactions in ecological relationships, such as those between predator and prey, for example. Until... more
Tooth enamel analysis shows two early hominin species ate a generalized diet  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Germany has found evidence that suggests two species of hominins from the Early... more
Identity of Little Foot fossil stirs controversy  Science Magazine · 6 days
New papers say the skeleton is part of a contested hominin species—claims other researchers dispute more
Super-Steamy Megalodon May Have Been Too Hot to Avoid Extinction  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Why did megalodon go extinct? New research has answers, and the shark's high body temperature likely played a part. more
Chile's pine forests: a botanical dinosaur bound for extinction?  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
In Quinquen, an indigenous community in southern Chile, Ricardo Melinir shows off a forest of Chilean pine trees—the araucaria araucana, a "living fossil" seen as sacred by several local tribes. more
Rapid genetic evolution linked to lighter skin pigmentation  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
The gene that causes lighter skin pigmentation, SLC24A5, was introduced from eastern African to southern African populations just 2,000 years ago. Strong positive selection caused this gene to rise in frequency among... more
Rapid genetic evolution linked to lighter skin pigmentation in a southern African population  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Populations of indigenous people in southern Africa carry a gene that causes lighter skin, and scientists have now identified the rapid evolution... more
Frog sex in the city: Urban tungara frogs are sexier than forest frogs  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
By 2050, almost 70 percent of the world's population will live in urban environments, according to the United Nations. But as cities... more
Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. Now, thanks to a new study of feathers from... more
Tiny Australian wallaby the last living link to extinct giant kangaroos  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Scientists reveal that Australia's pint-sized banded hare-wallaby is the closest living relative of the giant short-faced kangaroos which roamed the continent for millions of years, but... more
Scientists discover how birds and dinosaurs evolved to dazzle with colourful displays  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Iridescence is responsible for some of the most striking visual displays in the animal kingdom. Now, thanks to a new study of feathers from... more
DNA find: Tiny wallaby the last living link to extinct giant kangaroos  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A QUT-led collaboration with University of Adelaide reveals that Australia's pint-sized banded hare-wallaby is the closest living relative of the giant short-faced kangaroos which... more
In Mauritius, sugar cane means money, renewable energy  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Far out into the Indian Ocean where it is forced to be self-reliant, the island nation of Mauritius is weaning itself off fossil fuels by turning to its main cash-crop sugar cane,... more
Double the stress slows down evolution  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics more slowly if they also have to defend themselves against predators. more
Scientists find new giant dinosaur  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Paleontologists from Russia have described a new dinosaur, the Volgatitan. Seven of its fossilized vertebrae, buried in the ground for about 130 million years, were found on the banks of the Volga, not far from the village of... more
New insights in rust resistance in wheat  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Approximately 88 percent of wheat production is susceptible to yellow rust. Researchers have new results regarding the fungus, which evolves quickly to produce new, virulent strains. more
Biggest mass extinction caused by global warming leaving ocean animals gasping for breath  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
By combining ocean models, animal metabolism and fossil records, researchers show that the Permian mass extinction in the oceans was caused by... more
Ground-based detection of an extended helium atmosphere in the Saturn-mass exoplanet WASP-69b  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Hot gas giant exoplanets can lose part of their atmosphere due to strong stellar irradiation, affecting their physical and chemical evolution. Studies of atmospheric... more
Temperature-dependent hypoxia explains biogeography and severity of end-Permian marine mass extinction  Science Magazine · 2 weeks
Rapid climate change at the end of the Permian Period (~252 million years ago) is the hypothesized trigger for the largest mass extinction in Earth’s history.... more
Volcanic eruptions that depleted ocean oxygen may have set off the Great Dying  SCIENCE-NEWS · 2 weeks
Massive eruptions from volcanoes spewing greenhouse gases 252 million years ago may have triggered Earth’s biggest mass extinction. more
Researchers Find First Ever Evidence for Epigenetics in Archaea  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A team of scientists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the University of California, Santa Cruz, has found... more
Video: Why Antarctic fish don't freeze to death  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The notothenioid fishes that inhabit the Antarctic Ocean have evolved an unusual adaptation to living in icy waters. more
Double the stress slows down evolution  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Like other organisms, bacteria constantly have to fight to survive in hostile living conditions. Together with colleagues in Finland, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön have discovered that bacteria adapt to... more
Carbon emissions will reach 37 billion tonnes in 2018, a record high  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions from fossil fuels and industry are projected to rise more than 2% (range 1.8% to 3.7%) in 2018, taking global... more
Widespread decrease in wind energy resources found over the Northern Hemisphere  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
As climate change is becoming a greater matter of concern, efforts on mitigation are being undertaken by the world community. Developing clean and renewable energy is... more
New Dinosaur Species Discovered in Australia: Weewarrasaurus pobeni  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists in Australia have found a fossil fragment from a new species of ornithopod dinosaur that walked the Earth approximately... more
Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in the journal Nature, the... more
First Jellyfish Genome Sheds Light on Evolution of Animal Complexity  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A team of researchers from the United States and Germany has sequenced and analyzed the genome... more
Jawless fish study provides a new story for inner ear evolution  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics (BDR) and collaborators have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in... more
30 years of experimental evolution results in a new sex chromosome  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers report new findings of an experimental evolutionary project that ran for 30 years on the genomic mechanisms of sex determination in swordtail fish. more
Evolution of the inner ear: Insights from jawless fish  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Researchers have described for the first time the development of the hagfish inner ear. Published in the journal Nature, the study provides a new story for inner ear evolution that... more
Sea invertebrate sheds light on evolution of human blood, immune systems  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Botryllus schlosseri, a marine invertebrate that lives in underwater colonies resembling fuzzy pinheads clinging to rocks, has a blood-forming system with uncanny similarities to that of... more
Global carbon dioxide emissions rise even as coal wanes and renewables boom  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Renewable energy capacity has hit record levels and global coal use may have already peaked. But the world's carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels... more
CO2 emissions up 2.7%, world 'off course' to curb warming: study  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Global emissions of carbon dioxide mainly from fossil fuel burning will rise 2.7 percent in 2018, scientists said Wednesday, signalling a world "completely off course" in... more
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Orangutans can communicate about the past just like humans, new research finds
PHYS.ORG
Teenage sexting: We're letting young people down by not talking about it
PHYS.ORG
Video: Why Antarctic fish don't freeze to death
PHYS.ORG
VIDEO: To Save A Fox, Scientists Took To Land, Air And Sea
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