Evolution
Fossil fuel groups 'destroying' climate talks: NGOs  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Oil and gas groups were accused Saturday of seeking to influence climate talks in Madrid by paying millions in sponsorship and sending dozens of lobbyists to delay what scientists say is a necessary and... more
New Cretaceous-Period Mammal Unveiled  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
Paleontologists have discovered the remains of a previously unknown symmetrodont mammal that lived alongside dinosaurs in what is now China. The fossils provide a record of the final... more
Dial-a-frog: Researchers develop the 'FrogPhone' to remotely call frogs in the wild  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers have developed the 'FrogPhone', a novel device which allows scientists to call up a frog survey site and monitor them in the wild.... more
Why some scientists want to rewrite the history of how we learned to walk  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
It's not often that a fossil truly rewrites human evolution, but the recent discovery of an ancient extinct ape has... more
Seahorse breeding project aims to recover endangered species from near extinction  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Following a dramatic decline in numbers over the past decade, White's seahorse, also known as the Sydney seahorse, has recently been listed as an endangered species... more
The genome and transcriptome of the parasitic plant Striga sequenced  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The genome of the parasitic plant Striga, commonly known as witchweed, has been sequenced for the first time by RIKEN plant geneticists. This genetic analysis both offers insights... more
Researchers draw an evolutionary link between pregnancy and cancer malignancy  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
A UConn School of Dental Medicine researcher used pregnancy to unlock a missing link between various species of mammals and cancer malignancy--fundamentally changing the way we look at... more
New Fossil Fills Gap in Evolution of Comma Shrimps  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
A new species of comma shrimp that lived during the mid-Cretaceous period, between 95 and 90 million years... more
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the... more
Integrated hearing and chewing modules decoupled in a Cretaceous stem therian mammal  Science Magazine · 3 days
Based on multiple 3D skeletal specimens we report a new Cretaceous stem therian mammal that displays decoupling of hearing and chewing apparatuses and functions.... more
Extinction filters mediate the global effects of habitat fragmentation on animals  Science Magazine · 3 days
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the... more
New cretaceous mammal provides evidence for separation of hearing and chewing modules  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
A joint research team led by Mao Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and... more
How flowers adapt to their pollinators  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. They are the most diverse plant group on Earth with more than 300,000 species. Evolutionary biologists have now analyzed 3-dimensional models... more
Changing wildfires in California's Sierra Nevada may threaten northern goshawks  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Wildfire is a natural process in the forests of the western US, and many species have evolved to tolerate, if not benefit from it. But wildfire is changing.... more
Dull teeth, long skulls, specialized bites evolved in unrelated plant-eating dinosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Herbivorous dinosaurs evolved many times during the 180 million-year Mesozoic era, and while they didn't all evolve to chew, swallow, and digest their food in the... more
Can a single-celled organism 'change its mind'? New study says yes  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Once, single-cell life claimed sole dominion over the earth. For some three billion years, unfathomable generations of unicellular organisms ate, grew and reproduced among only each... more
Self-healing liquid brings new life to battery alternative  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are a revolutionary technology, found in everything from cellphones to cars. Their ubiquity and role in breaking dependence on fossil fuels earned a trio of researchers this year's... more
Southwestern U.S. Was Once Similar to Today’s Tibetan Plateau: Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
New research suggests that during the Late Cretaceous epoch to the Early Paleogene epoch (80-50 million... more
Alcohol tolerance may have saved our ancestors from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The ability to process alcohol may have saved humanity's ancestors from extinction, a new book suggests. more
Springy bamboo poles help villagers carry more than their own body weight  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Southeast Asia is a riot of colour and biodiversity. Boasting luxuriant rainforest and thousands of insects and mammals, the region is ripe for a... more
Solving Fossil Mystery Could Aid Mars Life Quest  ASTRO WATCH · 4 days
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. Research... more
Living at the edges  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Resembling an overgrown house cat with black-tipped ears and a stubby tail, the Canada lynx, a native of North America, teeters on the brink of extinction in the U.S. The few lynx that now roam parts of Washington and the... more
Cleveland Clinic to study ecological, evolutionary mechanisms that contribute to lung cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Jacob Scott, M.D., Ph.D., a physician researcher from Cleveland Clinic's Department of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, recently received a $2.8 million grant from... more
Mating avoidance in female olive baboons (Papio anubis) infected by Treponema pallidum  Science Magazine · 4 days
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are ubiquitous within wild animal populations, yet it remains largely unknown whether animals evolved behavioral avoidance mechanisms in response to... more
Single-cell connectomic analysis of adult mammalian lungs  Science Magazine · 4 days
Efforts to decipher chronic lung disease and to reconstitute functional lung tissue through regenerative medicine have been hampered by an incomplete understanding of cell-cell interactions governing tissue homeostasis. Because the structure of mammalian lungs... more
[Editors' Choice] Probiotics leap from gut to blood  Science Magazine · 4 days
In critically ill patients, probiotics are associated with probiotic strain bacteremia and can evolve in response to antibiotic administration. more
First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A new University of Barcelona study reveals the first empirical genetic evidence of human self-domestication, a hypothesis that humans have evolved to be friendlier and more cooperative by selecting their... more
New Pterosaur Species Unearthed in Lebanon: Mimodactylus libanensis  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
Paleontologists in Lebanon have discovered the extremely well-preserved fossilized remains of a previously unknown Cretaceous-period flying reptile. Pterosaurs were highly... more
More evidence of effectiveness required to sustain simulation education, say experts  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Simulation education has evolved significantly over the years and has become essential to preparing nurses for clinical practice, but sustaining its evolution will require greater evidence... more
Global carbon emissions growth slows, but hits record high  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The runaway train that is climate change is about to blow past another milestone: global fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions will reach yet another record high. Driven by rising natural gas... more
Imaging technique gives catalytic 2D material engineering a better view  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
A scanning electrochemical cell imaging technique shows how nanoscale structural features affect the catalytic activity of MoS2 monolayers for hydrogen evolution reactions, report researchers. more
Imaging technique gives catalytic 2D material engineering a better view  nanowerk · 5 days
A scanning electrochemical cell imaging technique shows how nanoscale structural features affect the catalytic activity of MoS2 monolayers for hydrogen evolution reactions. more
Meteorite-loving microorganism  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Chemolithotrophic microorganisms derive their energy from inorganic sources. Research into the physiological processes of these organisms—which are grown on meteorite—provides new insights into the potential of extraterrestrial materials as a source of accessible nutrients and energy for microorganisms of the... more
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
The extinct sea scorpion species Jaekelopterus rhenaniae had eyes comparable to those of today's horseshoe crabs. The two-and-a-half-meter predator was... more
Compound eyes: The visual apparatus of today's horseshoe crabs goes back 400 million years  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The eyes of the extinct sea scorpion Jaekelopterus rhenaniae have the same structure as the eyes of modern horseshoe crabs... more
Bird evolution unique in seeing shrinking testes  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Birds are the only group of vertebrate animals to have repeatedly evolved smaller testes over time according to a new study. more
Researchers find that 'native advertising' builds credibility, not perceived as 'tricking' visitors  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The concept of native advertising has been in existence for as long as advertisements were designed to resemble the editorial content in newspapers and... more
Modeling the evolutionary development of C4 photosynthesis  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The C4 cycle supercharges photosynthesis and evolved independently more than 62 times. Using constraint-based modeling, researchers successfully investigated which factors contributed to the evolution of the C4 trait. The study was a joint project... more
Illuminating the path for super-resolution imaging with improved rhodamine dyes  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
In recent years, there has been a rapid evolution of advanced fluorescence imaging techniques such as single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) that allows for unprecedented resolution beyond the Abbe... more
Paleontologists Find Fossils of Six New Dragonfly Species  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Six new species of dragonflies that lived about 50 million years ago (early Eocene epoch) have been identified from fossils... more
Cell-free synthetic biology comes of age  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
If you ask Northwestern Engineering's Michael Jewett, the potential of cell-free gene expression has always made sense. Rip off the wall of the cell, collect its insides, and teach the cell catalyst to produce new kinds... more
Researchers discover a potential window for managing insects without chemicals  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The world's insects are headed down the path of extinction with more than 40 percent of insect species in decline according to the first global scientific review, published... more
New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
An international team has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). This chromosome is only found in germline cells, the cells that hold genetic information which... more
Scientists build a 'Hubble Space Telescope' to study multiple genome sequences  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A new tool that simultaneously compares 1.4 million genetic sequences can classify how species are related to each other at far larger scales than previously possible.... more
Scientists re-counted Australia's extinct species, and the result is devastating  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
It's well established that unsustainable human activity is damaging the health of the planet. The way we use Earth threatens our future and that of many animals and... more
Solar Wind Around Pluto instrument confirms solar wind slows farther away from the sun  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights... more
Solar wind slows farther away from the Sun  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Measurements taken by the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument aboard NASA's New Horizons spacecraft are providing important new insights from some of the farthest reaches of space ever explored. Astronomers now... more
Divers of the past: Plesiosaur research reveals rapid increase of blood cell size  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
In the Mesozoic era, about 250 to 65 million years ago a large number of reptiles populated the oceans. The most successful... more
New evolutionary insights into the early development of songbirds  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
An international team led by Alexander Suh at Uppsala University has sequenced a chromosome in zebra finches called the germline-restricted chromosome (GRC). This chromosome is only found in germline cells,... more
Scientists Re-Counted Australia's Extinct Species. And the Result Is Devastating  LIVE SCIENCE · 7 days
In the most comprehensive assessment of its kind, researchers find that 100 endemic Australian species living in 1788 are now extinct. more
95-million-year-old fossil reveals new group of pterosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists. more
First action plan in 25 years aims to save Australia's snakes and lizards from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The status of Australian snakes and lizards has deteriorated significantly over the past two decades, with the number... more
Were Neanderthals, Denisovans and Other Archaic Humans Victims of Sixth Mass Extinction?  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. Neanderthals were stocky hunters adapted to Europe’s cold steppes, their... more
Cretaceous-Period Mammal Had Bizarre Middle Ear  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Paleontologists in China have unearthed a nearly complete skeleton of a previously unknown Cretaceous mammal species with well-preserved middle ear bones. The ancient creature... more
Majungasaurus Replaced All Its Teeth Every Two Months: Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Majungasaurus, a carnivorous dinosaur that lived approximately 70 million years ago (Cretaceous period) in what is now Madagascar,... more
Astronomers Find ‘Impossible’ Stellar Black Hole in Milky Way  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
An international team of astronomers has discovered an exceptionally massive black hole of stellar origin with a mass... more
Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Newly-hatched tortoises take their first steps at a Bangladesh conservation park, their feet barely visible under hard shells that carry the weight of the species on their backs. more
Researchers demonstrate machine-guided engineering of AAV capsids  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have become the go-to vehicle for delivering therapeutic gene cargo to target tissues for the recent wave of gene therapies that are in development in academic and biotechnology laboratories. However, natural... more
Neanderthal Extinction Caused by Inbreeding and Smallness of Their Populations, Study Suggests  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A long-standing enigma in paleoanthropology is the demise of Neanderthals about 40,000 years ago. There is general agreement that their disappearance coincides with migration... more
Medical News Today: Humans and autoimmune diseases continue to evolve together  MNT · 1 week
As humans have evolved the ability to fight pathogens, these same adaptations have led to the emergence of inflammatory diseases, new research suggests. more
Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming carbon dioxide for growth  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Over the course of several months, researchers created Escherichia coli strains that consume carbon dioxide for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity... more
Animal-Like Embryos Evolved Long Before Complex Animals, Scientists Say  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
Complex animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how this major... more
Researchers study chickens, ostriches, penguins to learn how flight feathers evolved  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
If you took a careful look at the feathers on a chicken, you'd find many different forms within the same bird -- even within a single... more
Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a new study. more
Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Over the course of several months, researchers created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity of bacterial metabolism... more
Humans co-evolved with immune-related diseases -- and it's still happening  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Some of the same mutations allowing humans to fend off deadly infections also make us more prone to certain inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease. Researchers... more
Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Almost 40% of global land plant species are categorized as very rare, and these species are most at risk for extinction as... more
Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a study published November 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS... more
Researchers determine dinosaur replaced teeth as fast as sharks  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A meat-eating dinosaur species (Majungasaurus) that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, as reported in a new study... more
New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported... more
Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food. more
Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Over the course of several months, researchers in Israel created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity of... more
Animal embryos evolved before animals  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30 or 40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms has been the focus of intense debate. more
Solving fossil mystery could aid Mars life quest  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Research which suggests that structures previously thought to be fossils may, in fact, be mineral deposits could save future Mars missions valuable time and resources. more
Linkage between evolution of pregnancy and cancer spread explained  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Scientists at Yale have explained a potentially important connection in the evolution of mammalian pregnancy and the spread of cancer. more
Discovering hidden plant medicines on your doorstep  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
EI is part of the global effort to sequence the DNA all of the known species of animals, plants and fungi on earth, known as the Earth BioGenome Project. Contributing to the UK arm... more
Extra-terrestrial impacts may have triggered 'bursts' of plate tectonics  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
When -- and how -- Earth's surface evolved from a hot, primordial mush into a rocky planet continually resurfaced by plate tectonics remain some of the biggest unanswered questions in... more
Conservation of biodiversity is like an insurance policy for the future of mankind  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Fens and bogs are valuable research environments for paleoecologists due to ancient fossils that have survived in the peatland for thousands of... more
Slash emissions now or face climate disaster, UN warns  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The world will miss its chance to avert climate disaster without an immediate and all-but-impossible fall in fossil fuel emissions, the UN said Tuesday in its annual assessment on greenhouse... more
Did human hunting activities alone drive great auks' extinction?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
New insight on the extinction history of a flightless seabird that vanished from the shores of the North Atlantic during the 19th century has been published today in eLife. more
Did human hunting activities alone drive great auks' extinction?  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
New insight on the extinction history of a flightless seabird that vanished from the shores of the North Atlantic during the 19th century has been published today. more
Political distrust a major barrier to climate action  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Distrust in politicians and the political system is preventing people from supporting increased taxes on fossil fuels, a potentially important climate policy. By comparison, most people believe in climate change. So says... more
Recrutement of a lateral root developmental pathway into root nodule formation of legumes  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Peas and other legumes develop spherical or cylindrical structures—called nodules—in their roots to establish a mutually beneficial relationship with bacteria that convert... more
Study shows evolution turns genes back on to regain function  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Genes often mutate and lose their natural or synthetic function over long-term evolution, which could be good if that stops drug resistance of infectious microbes or cancer. A... more
Extraterrestrial impacts may have triggered 'bursts' of plate tectonics  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When—and how—the Earth's surface evolved from a hot, primordial mush into a rocky planet continually resurfaced by plate tectonics remain some of the biggest unanswered questions in earth science research.... more
Fossil fuel divestment will increase carbon emissions, not lower themy  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A global campaign encouraging individuals, organizations and institutional investors to sell off investments in fossil fuel companies is gathering pace. According to 350.org, US$11 trillion has already been... more
Scientists Find Fossil Asteroidal Ice in Meteorite  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
An international team of scientists from the UK and Japan has found ‘fossilized asteroidal ice’ and pristine dust materials in a 4.6-billion-year-old... more
Dinosaur skull turns paleontology assumptions on their head  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A team of researchers has unearthed a well-preserved Styracosaurus skull -- and its facial imperfections have implications for how paleontologists identify new species of dinosaurs. Nicknamed Hannah, the dinosaur was a Styracosaurus... more
16-million-year-old fossil shows springtails hitchhiking on winged termite  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
A newly reported, 16-million-year-old fossil is shedding light on how a group of tiny arthropods may have traversed the globe -- by hitchhiking. more
16-million-year-old fossil shows springtails hitchhiking on winged termite  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When trying to better the odds for survival, a major dilemma that many animals face is dispersal—being able to pick up and leave to occupy new lands, find fresh resources and mates,... more
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