Engineering
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology  SCIENCE DAILY · 9 hours
A team has compiled a roadmap for the future of synthetic or engineering biology, based on the input of 80 leaders in the field from more than 30... more
A miniature robot that could check colons for early signs of disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 9 hours
Engineers have shown it is technically possible to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take micro-ultrasound images. Known as a Sonopill,... more
There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally  NPR · 10 hours
Social scientist Arthur Brooks set out to figure out how life after 50 can be more professionally fulfilling. His advice? "Stop being an innovator and start being an instructor." more
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Genetically engineered trees that provide fire-resistant lumber for homes. Modified organs that won't be rejected. Synthetic microbes that monitor your gut to detect invading disease organisms and kill... more
Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics. The... more
Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Researchers at the University of Maryland have captured the most direct evidence to date of a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there. The result, featured... more
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the U.S. environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river... more
Nature-inspired materials can be used in applications ranging from tunneling to space  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Optimal materials for cutting tools of tunnel boring machines (TBM) were developed in the recently finished three-year long project "Innovative polycrystalline diamond (PDC) drag... more
A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Technologies like solar panels and LEDs require a cover material that repels water, dirt and oil while still letting plenty of light through. There is also... more
Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have... more
Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. Although processes for textile recycling exist, they tend to be... more
Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious journal, Nature Communications. The experiment has... more
Researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Blockchain Technology is known to be one of the top disruptive technologies of today that is driving the fourth industrial revolution. A blockchain, designed to be resistant to the modification... more
Image: Metal bracket in Ariane 5 is 3-D-printed in titanium  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
This organically-styled bracket, designed for the interior of an Ariane 5 launcher, was 3-D printed in space-worthy titanium alloy for an R&D project. more
Engineers 3-D print flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces  MIT · 18 hours
Techniques could lead to personalized wearable and implantable devices. more
Spinning star scientists  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Scientists at a research university often play a formative role in the commercialization of intellectual property and inventions emerging from their laboratories. Often, the "spinning off" of a startup company will be to the benefit of society as a whole... more
AI, robots, data software helping create new approach for planning cities of the future  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Artificial intelligence and robots are playing significant roles as planners develop the cities of the future. The architecture, engineering and... more
Advancing AI for video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Voxel51, a University of Michigan startup, today launched its flagship product—a software platform designed to make it easier, faster and more affordable to access the untapped potential of... more
New technology by Neurodata Lab acquires accurate physiological data  NEWS MEDICAL · 20 hours
New technology by Neurodata Lab is capable to acquire physiological data by simply pointing a webcam at one’s face, with accuracy comparable to special wearable equipment. more
NEEMO: Testing space gear under the sea  PHYS.ORG · 20 hours
NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operations takes place more than 18 meters below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. For nine days, astronauts, engineers, and scientists live and work underwater, testing new technologies for space. more
Loughborough University student designs portable wallet to keep medication cool  NEWS MEDICAL · 20 hours
A student from Loughborough University has designed a portable wallet to keep medication cool after being inspired by his girlfriend who was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. more
Metabolic engineering of cannabinoids – are we there yet?  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
There has recently been a surge in research into the biosynthetic pathways of cannabinoids and the potential for commercialized metabolic engineering. more
Senegal shines in showcase for female tech innovation  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
Barcode health cards, mobile apps for victims of violence and an online legal platform are just some of the ideas showing the direction of female digital pioneers in Africa, with Senegalese innovators... more
Henry Ford Cancer Institute treats its first patient with CAR T-cell therapy  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Henry Ford Cancer Institute has treated its first patient with CAR T-cell therapy, an approach that uses engineered cells from a patient's immune system... more
Senators agree surprise medical bills must go. But how?  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Two years, 16 hearings and one massive bipartisan package of legislation later, a key Senate committee says it is ready to start marking up a bill next week designed to... more
Quantum music to my ears  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
It sounds like an old-school vinyl record, but the distinctive crackle in the music streamed into Chris Holloway's laboratory is atomic in origin. The group at the National Institute for Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado, spent a long... more
Foreign investment limits cost Canadian economy almost $10 billion a year says new study  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Canada is stunting its own economy and blocking businesses from reaping the benefits of innovation by clinging to protectionist policies... more
Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
An international team has shown the reversible self-assembly of protein cages using gold ions to direct the process. The team designed protein building blocks that formed 3D structures... more
Engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50%  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Rice University's solar-powered approach for purifying salt water with sunlight and nanoparticles is even more efficient than its creators first believed. more
Closer look at supernova dust suggests there's more of it than previously assumed  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A pair of researchers with the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry dust from a supernova have found evidence that suggests it is... more
Engineers demonstrate superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime  nanowerk · 2 days
Snails can anchor themselves in place using a structure known as an epiphragm. The snail's slimy secretion works its way into the pores found on even seemingly smooth... more
Machine learning algorithms applied to biopsy images can improve gut disease diagnosis  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
A study published in the open access journal JAMA Open Network June 14 by scientists at the University of Virginia schools of Engineering and... more
Radically different telescope design offers deeper look into space  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A radically different type of X-ray space telescope has been designed by scientists in Sweden, using advanced optic techniques that were originally developed in medical imaging research. more
Supercomputers aid in novel simulations of gamma ray generation research  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
While intense magnetic fields are naturally generated by neutron stars, researchers have been striving to achieve similar results for many years. UC San Diego mechanical and aerospace engineering... more
New process enables 3D printing of biological tissues without scaffolds  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Engineered tissues and organs have been grown with various degrees of success in labs for many years. Many of them have used a scaffolding approach where cells are... more
Radically different telescope design offers deeper look into space  nanowerk · 2 days
A radically different type of X-ray space telescope has been designed by scientists in Sweden, using advanced optic techniques that were originally developed in medical imaging research. more
Gold adds the shine of reversible assembly to protein cages  nanowerk · 2 days
An international team reports the gold led reversible self-assembly of 3D cages from engineered proteins. more
Engineer's 'Smart Speaker Firewall' isolates Alexa devices in a snap  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Chuck Carey is an experienced engineer and self-described technophile, but he's also wary of the proliferation of data-hoovering, Internet-connected devices such as the microphone-and-speaker combos used with digital... more
Engineers demonstrate superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime (Update)  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
If you've ever pressed a picture-hanging strip onto the wall only to realize it's slightly off-center, you know the disappointment behind adhesion as we typically experience... more
Engineers demonstrate superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
If you've ever pressed a picture-hanging strip onto the wall only to realize it's slightly off-center, you know the disappointment behind adhesion as we typically experience it: it... more
Methods in belowground botany  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Plant root systems play a crucial role in ecosystems, radically impacting everything from nutrient cycling to species composition. Despite their importance, scientists are just beginning to develop the tools to understand how these complex systems are structured, how they function,... more
Superstrong, reversible adhesive that works like snail slime  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Snails can anchor themselves in place using a structure known as an epiphragm. The snail's slimy secretion works its way into the pores found on even seemingly smooth surfaces, then hardens, providing... more
Twin NASA Satellites Will Ride SpaceX Falcon Heavy to Study Earth's Ionosphere  SPACE.COM · 2 days
NASA will be launching two identical miniature satellites next week as part of a project designed to help scientists understand how Earth's atmosphere muddies... more
3-D printed tissues and organs without the scaffolding  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Engineered tissues and organs have been grown with various degrees of success in labs for many years. Many of them have used a scaffolding approach where cells are seeded onto biodegradable supportive... more
Scientists unearth green treasure—albeit rusty—in the soil  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Cornell University engineers have taken a step in understanding how iron in the soil may unlock naturally occurring phosphorus bound in organic matter, which can be used in fertilizer, so that one day farmers... more
Drones for early detection of forest fires  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The UC3M's researchers coordinating the scientific part of the project, Fernando García y Abdulla al-Kaff, from the Department of Systems Engineering and Automation, have developed the complete automatic flight system, as well as the... more
Inducing an osteoarthritic (OA) phenotype in a cartilage-on-a-chip (COC) model  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
In an aging population, the social impact of osteoarthritis (OA) can dramatically increase to become the most common musculoskeletal disease. However, at present, therapies are limited to palliative... more
Small bioengineered implant promises long-lasting relief from Type 1 diabetes  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
People suffering from Type 1 diabetes are set to benefit from an innovative therapy being developed in an EU-funded project that promises to restore the body's ability to... more
Innovative technique uses sensory nanoparticles to detect disease  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are taking advantage of a unique phenomenon of nanoparticles to develop a test for early detection of different types of diseases, including cancer. more
Parasites affect host responses to environmental change  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Ignoring the role of parasites may lead to a misinterpretation of organism responses to environmental change, according to an Innovative Viewpoints article by ecologists from the University of Georgia. Their paper, "To improve ecological... more
Innovative technique uses sensory nanoparticles to detect disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Like dipping a donut hole in powdered sugar, nanoparticles collect a unique coating of proteins from the blood. In a new study, researchers present a nanoparticle sensor array that they are developing... more
The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers have presented support for the theory that marine invertebrates with larger body size are generally more sensitive to reductions in oxygen... more
Medical News Today: Foods with similar nutrition content affect the gut differently  MNT · 3 days
Researchers came up with an innovative approach for comparing foods with similar nutritional labels and found that they affect gut bacteria differently. more
RUAG: Suppliers are key to mission success  SPACE NEWS · 3 days
RUAG Space offers high-performance, reliable products for launch vehicles and satellites, offering engineering, design and production. SpaceNews.com more
The mast is raised for NASA's Mars 2020 rover  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
In this image, taken on June 5, 2019, engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, take a moment after attaching the remote sensing mast to the Mars 2020... more
Flickering sky islands generate andean biodiversity  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A new video shows how climate change connected and disconnected Andean "sky islands" during the past million years. The innovative mathematical model used to make the video was based on fossil pollen records and shows how... more
Using prevalent technologies and 'Internet of Things' data for atmospheric science  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The use of prevalent technologies and crowdsourced data may benefit weather forecasting and atmospheric research, according to a new paper authored by Dr. Noam David, a... more
Raising fluid walls around living cells  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Cell culture plates that are in everyday use in biology can be effectively transformed into microfluidic devices, opening paths for biologists to miniaturize cell-based workflows. In a recent report, Ph.D. researcher Cristian Soitu and co-workers in... more
Student creates portable wallet to keep medication cool after being inspired by girlfriend's story  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A student from Loughborough University has designed a portable wallet to keep medication cool after being inspired by his girlfriend... more
A new method for the generation of intense X-ray and gamma-ray radiation  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
International group of researchers including scientists from Skoltech have invented a new method for the generation of intense X-ray and gamma-ray radiation based on... more
Study reveals everyday technology helps fight loneliness  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A new report suggests that people feel less lonely when they have access to everyday technology such as a radio, television or tablet. The research, co-produced by the University of York and the loneliness... more
Lawyers suggest better labeling on prophetic patent applications  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A pair of lawyers, one with Fordham University, the other, Stanford Law School, have published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science in which they decry the use of poor labeling... more
New technology aims to improve taste, shelf life, production of beer, food  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Just in time for summer—a new technology to improve the taste, quality and shelf life of juice and other beverages, and help craft brewers... more
The Search for Habitable Alien Worlds in Earth's Backyard Heats Up  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
A new instrument designed to find potentially habitable alien worlds in the nearest star system to our own sun just revved up. more
How NASA's Spitzer has stayed alive for so long  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
After nearly 16 years of exploring the cosmos in infrared light, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope will be switched off permanently on Jan. 30, 2020. By then, the spacecraft will have... more
Ford opens Israel tech lab in move toward driverless cars  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Ford has opened a research center in Israel, joining a legion of major automakers racing to develop new technologies for the world of driverless cars. more
Monitoring educational equity  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the U.S. education system, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Indicators—measures used to track performance... more
Engineers crack the code to quickly diagnose anti-malarial drug resistance  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
One of the keys to quickly diagnosing anti-malarial drug resistance -- potentially saving lives -- lies in testing whole blood instead of extracting DNA, eliminating processing steps that... more
DeNovix granted US patent for CellDrop Automated Cell Counter  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
DeNovix Inc. announces the award of US Patent 10,302,568 for their innovation in the field of cell counting. The CellDrop Automated Cell Counter, engineered with DirectPipette Technology, is the first... more
Excelitas to showcase new cytometry solutions at CYTO Vancouver  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
Excelitas Technologies, a global technology leader delivering innovative, customized photonic solutions, will showcase its latest solutions for cytometry applications at CYTO Vancouver. more
Rapid rise in Big Data facilitates digital transformation of healthcare  NEWS MEDICAL · 7 days
The unprecedented implications of digital health innovations, being co-produced by the mainstreaming and integration of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and cyber-physical systems in healthcare, are examined... more
New technology harnesses bacterial jumping genes for precise DNA integration  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
A new discovery by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons could fix one of the major shortcomings of current gene-editing tools, including CRISPR, and... more
Ultra-fast new technology to detect bacteria  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
A new detection method which can identify the presence of bacteria within a minute, while distinguishing healthy from non-viable bacteria, could save many lives and a lot of money. Scientists at the University of Warwick reported... more
[Focus] Twists and turns to translating 4-1BB cancer immunotherapy  Science Magazine · 1 week
Previous shortcomings of CD137-targeted immunotherapy may be overcome by engineered bispecific agents (Claus et al., this issue). more
A model of guided cell self-organization for rapid and spontaneous formation of functional vessels  Science Magazine · 1 week
Most achievements to engineer blood vessels are based on multiple-step manipulations such as manual sheet rolling or sequential cell seeding... more
New gene editor harnesses jumping genes for precise DNA integration  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new discovery by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons could fix one of the major shortcomings of current gene-editing tools, including CRISPR, and... more
Researchers develop semi-liquid metal anode for next-generation batteries  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Mellon College of Science and College of Engineering have developed a semiliquid lithium metal-based anode that represents a new paradigm in battery design. Lithium batteries made using... more
The battle to save citrus fruits  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Huanglongbing, (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has devastated Florida's citrus farms. Although some growers in China and Brazil have been able to control the problem, California groves are now threatened, according to an article in... more
Construction kit for custom-designed products  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products, or... more
Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have found a significant improvement in the peripheral awareness of people who played computer games specially designed around using peripheral vision. This finding opens up the possibility that these types of... more
Construction kit for custom-designed products  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new... more
Biotechnology construction kit for custom-designed products  nanowerk · 1 week
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to product assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists have now succeeded in changing these enzymes so that entirely new natural products,... more
An innovative electron microscope overturning common knowledge of 88 years history  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective... more
An unnatural way to make natural products  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Researchers have developed an innovative new process for synthesizing isoprenoids, which are chemical compounds used in countless pharmaceutical and consumer products. more
Detecting bacteria such as E. coli in minutes  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A discovery by researchers at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick offers a new technology for detecting bacteria in minutes by 'zapping' the bacteria with electricity. more
Facebook opens UK engineering hub to fight harmful content  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Facebook is opening an engineering center in London that will build tech tools aimed at keeping harmful content off its site. more
Starshade would take formation flying to extremes  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Anyone who's ever seen aircraft engaged in formation flying can appreciate the feat of staying highly synchronized while airborne. In work sponsored by NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP), engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory... more
NASA's Psyche mission has a metal world in its sights  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Designed to explore a metal asteroid that could be the heart of a planet, the Psyche mission is readying for a 2022 launch. After extensive review, NASA Headquarters... more
New research allows development of autonomously updating brain-computer interface  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
A University of Houston engineer is reporting in eNeuro that a brain-computer interface, a form of artificial intelligence, can sense when its user is expecting a reward by examining the... more
Farmer researchers reap more benefits than just increased crop production  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Farmers have been innovators and experimenters for millennia. They developed new types of crops and methods of farming. more
An unnatural way to make natural products  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
From medicine to fragrances, nature provides many of the key chemical compounds needed in an endless number of pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Now, a cutting-edge technique engineered by researchers at University of South Florida... more
Engineers boost output of solar desalination system by 50%
PHYS.ORG
Starshade would take formation flying to extremes
PHYS.ORG
Researchers develop new metamaterial that can improve MRI quality and reduce scan time
PHYS.ORG
InSight's team tries new strategy to help the 'mole'
PHYS.ORG
At-line Food Production Analysis using an Innovative NIR Spectrometer
NEWS MEDICAL
Cooling wood: Engineers create strong, sustainable solution for passive cooling
PHYS.ORG
USC Students' Rocket Reaches Space in Record-Setting Launch
SPACE.COM
Fresh