Conservancy
This rat is foiling developers' plans to capitalize on a weaker Endangered Species Act  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Southern California developers have long sought relief from regulations protecting wildlife, and earlier this month the Trump administration obliged, formally... more
Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from... more
Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first time  REUTERS · 22 hours
Scientists in Florida have artificially induced reproductive spawning of an endangered Atlantic coral species for the first time in an aquarium setting, a breakthrough... more
Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have... more
San Francisco Zoo brings red-legged frogs back to Yosemite  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A healthy population of red-legged frogs is hopping in Yosemite National Park, helped by a reintroduction program with the San Francisco Zoo. more
US environmental groups sue over wildlife protection rollbacks  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
US environmental groups have sued the administration of President Donald Trump over rollbacks that weaken the Endangered Species Act, a law credited with saving iconic species from the bald eagle to the... more
Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. The study of the finches of the Galapagos Islands could change the way conservation biologists think... more
Conflicting consequences of climate change for Arctic nesting geese  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Life over the last half-century has been pretty good for populations of Svalbard barnacle geese. A hunting ban implemented in the 1950s in their overwintering area in Scotland has led... more
French Guiana grapples with Asian craving for fish bladder  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
For years, Asian demand for a dried fish bladder prized as a culinary delicacy—and purported aphrodisiac—has been a boon to French Guiana's fishing industry, but officials are racing to rein... more
'Otterly adorable'?: Demand for cute selfies puts animals at risk  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Social media users are fuelling a burgeoning appetite for acquiring wild otters and other endangered animals as pets, conservationists say, warning the trend could push species towards extinction. more
How conserving nature's 'umbrella' species could benefit whole habitats  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
In conservation, charismatic mammals and birds such as the black rhinoceros and the capercaillie get a lot of attention, while others, like invertebrates, are often ignored. One way of addressing... more
Century-old fish scales reveals startling decline in salmon populations  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers drawing on 100-year-old sources of salmon data have found that recent returns of wild adult sockeye salmon to the Skeena River—Canada's second largest salmon watershed— are 75 percent lower... more
Connected forest networks on oil palm plantations key to protecting endangered species  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Set-aside patches of high-quality forest on palm oil plantations may help protect species like orangutans, as well as various species of insects, birds and... more
Connected forest networks on oil palm plantations key to protecting endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Connected areas of high-quality forest running through oil palm plantations could help support increased levels of biodiversity, new research suggests. more
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green sturgeon, a threatened species... more
Shasta dam releases can be managed to benefit both salmon and sturgeon, study finds  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Cold water released from Lake Shasta into the Sacramento River to benefit endangered salmon can be detrimental to young green... more
Using principles of mechanics and physics to identify state of individual cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have discovered a new way to identify the state of individual cells by bringing principles of... more
Research using mechanics and physics could predict diseases that 'stress out' cells  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have discovered a new way to identify the state of individual cells by bringing principles of... more
Conservationists, EU MPs urge ban on trophy hunting of endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Dozens of European parliamentarians and conservation groups called Sunday on the regulator of global wildlife trade to ban all trophy hunting of rhinos, elephants and other... more
Wildlife summit mulls trade rules to counter 'unprecedented' species declines  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Conservationists warned of "unprecedented" species declines Saturday as countries met in Geneva to tighten rules on trade in elephant ivory and products from other endangered animal and plants. more
Beloved baby dugong 'Mariam' dies in Thailand with plastic in stomach  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
A sick baby dugong whose fight for recovery won hearts in Thailand and cast a spotlight on ocean conservation has died from an infection exacerbated by... more
From tusks to tails, nations eye trade in endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Representatives of more than 180 nations are meeting to agree on protections for vulnerable species, taking up issues such as the trade in ivory and the demand for... more
South Sudan: Latest images reveal a global hotspot for biodiversity  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
In 1979 the government of the Democratic Republic of Sudan and the government of Italy began working together to survey the incredible wildlife in the forests of Sudan's... more
Lizards from cold climates may face rapid extinctions in next 60 years, study shows  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Lizards that produce live young are significantly more likely to be driven to extinction through climate change than those that... more
Global meet to mull trade rules to protect endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Specialists will meet in Geneva from Saturday to try to tighten rules on trade in elephant ivory, rhino horns and other endangered animal and plant species amid growing... more
Now endangered: The very act that protects wildlife  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The Trump administration recently announced a proposal that would gut the Endangered Species Act. The news follows in the wake of a report from the United Nations earlier this year that more... more
Shift to renewable electricity a win-win at statewide level  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Amid rollbacks of the Clean Power Plan and other environmental regulations at the federal level, several U.S. states, cities, and towns have resolved to take matters into their own hands... more
Newly discovered mussels may help refocus conservation efforts in Texas  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A team of researchers recently discovered two new freshwater mussel species in Texas, which will likely impact current conservation efforts by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and... more
Rare antelopes and black cats  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Numerous large mammals have been documented with video traps on Mount Kilimanjaro by researchers. The protected areas of the mountain are of tremendous importance for the biodiversity of this animal group. more
Research bias may leave some primates at risk  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk. more
Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens... more
Helping threatened coho salmon could generate hundreds of millions in non-market economic benefits  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
A new study provides evidence that increasing the abundance of a threatened or endangered species can deliver large benefits to the citizens... more
Federal agency to consider protections for lake sturgeon  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says it will consider whether to list the lake sturgeon as an endangered or threatened species. more
Research bias may leave some primates at risk  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Recent primate research has had a heavy focus on a few charismatic species and nationally protected parks and forests, leaving some lesser known primates and their habitats at risk, according researchers at... more
Electronic waste is mined for rare earth elements  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Rare earth elements are the "secret sauce" of numerous advanced materials for energy, transportation, defense and communications applications. Their largest use for clean energy is in permanent magnets, which retain magnetic properties... more
Synchrotron reveals important information about famous sculpture by Paul Gauguin  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Analysis carried out by Conservation Scientist Dr. Eric Henderson at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan allowed National Gallery of Canada's (NGC) Chief Conservator... more
Rare antelopes and black cats  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Tanzania is home to an elusive antelope species that cannot be found anywhere else in the world. According to the Red List, it can be classified as endangered. The first photograph of one of these antelopes was taken... more
Forest carbon still plentiful post-wildfire after century of fire exclusion  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Forests in Yosemite National Park hold more carbon today than they did 120 years ago despite burning in a severe wildfire in 2013, according to a Penn State-led... more
Monarchs caught up in rewrite of endangered species rule  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Hand-raising monarch butterflies in the midst of a global extinction crisis, Laura Moore and her neighbors gather round in her suburban Maryland yard to launch a butterfly newly emerged from... more
Conservationists urge 'tighter wildlife laws' after Trump move  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Countries should be strengthening their laws protecting endangered species, not weakening them, international conservationists said Tuesday, after US President Donald Trump's administration announced plans to alter the country's Endangered Species Act. more
Growth of wind energy points to future challenges, promise  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
Advances in adapting the technology and better methods for predicting wind conditions have fanned significant growth of the use of wind turbines for electricity in the last 40 years. A... more
Editorial: Trump guts the Endangered Species Act. Polar bears and bald eagles, take notice  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
The Trump administration announced reckless and potentially devastating new rules Monday that will weaken the Endangered Species Act, which currently... more
Trump Administration Guts Endangered Species Act  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
The new rules, which the administration says will benefit businesses, tell regulators not to consider science alone when making decisions about endangered species. more
Largest-ever study of coral communities unlocks global solution to save reefs  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The largest study ever conducted of its kind has identified where and how to save coral reef communities in the Indo-Pacific, according to an international group... more
Trump overhauls endangered species protections  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The Trump administration on Monday rolled out some of the broadest changes in decades to enforcement of the landmark Endangered Species Act, allowing the government to put an economic cost on saving a species and other changes critics... more
Singapore to ban sale of elephant ivory from 2021  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Singapore said Monday it will impose a blanket ban on the domestic sale of elephant ivory and products from 2021 as the government tightens its campaign against illegal wildlife trade. more
How to make a better water filter? Turn it inside out  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
More than 800 million people lack access to clean and safe water. Recent advances in water filtration technology have created new ways to filter water and... more
Trump administration re-authorizes 'cyanide bombs' to kill wildlife  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
US President Donald Trump's administration has re-authorized the use of controversial poison traps known as "cyanide bombs" to kill wild foxes, coyotes and feral dogs despite overwhelming opposition from conservation groups. more
Despite habitat protection, endangered owls decline in Mount Rainier National Park  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
When the Northern Spotted Owl was protected under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, the primary threat to the species was the loss of old-growth forest.... more
Despite habitat protection, endangered owls decline in Mount Rainier National Park  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When the Northern Spotted Owl was protected under the Endangered Species Act in 1990, the primary threat to the species was the loss of the old-growth... more
Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. In particular, stone buildings and sculptures made of plaster and marble are... more
Calcium: Good for bones, good for cultural conservation  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
When it comes to cultural heritage sites, there are few things historians wouldn't do to preserve them for future generations. In particular, stone buildings and sculptures made of plaster and marble are... more
Secrets of Chimanimani revealed in biodiversity surveys  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Despite not boasting the fame of the Serengeti or Kruger National Park, Chimanimani, straddling the Mozambican and Zimbabwean border, is an area like no other. Diverse landscapes and unique plant and animal species coexist... more
Cheap renewable energy: Cracking the photosynthetic process that enables plants to split wat  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Scientists have cracked a key step in nature's water-splitting recipe, which powers all plant life on Earth and may be harnessed to... more
Industrial fishing behind plummeting shark numbers  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A team of researchers, led by international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London), has discovered that sharks are much rarer in habitats nearer large human populations and fish markets. The team also found that the... more
Can we really restore or protect natural habitats to 'offset' those we destroy?  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
In the forests of northern Sweden, a major train line cuts through land originally protected for migratory birds—so new seasonal wetlands have... more
Energy development wins when it's pitted against endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Widespread species decline at the hands of humans is a powerful tale. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, more than 27 percent of 100,000 assessed species are... more
Observation of a transition between dynamical phases in a quantum degenerate Fermi gas  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
A proposed paradigm for out-of-equilibrium quantum systems is that an analog of quantum phase transitions exists between parameter regimes of qualitatively distinct... more
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a... more
Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a... more
Unexpected nut eating by gorillas  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Scientists have observed a population of western lowland gorillas in Loango National Park, Gabon using their teeth to crack open the woody shells of Coula edulis nuts. The researchers combined direct feeding observations and mechanical tests of seed... more
New research shows effectiveness of laws for protecting imperiled species, remaining gaps  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
New research from the Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at Defenders of Wildlife, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows for the first time... more
Convention on Biological Diversity adopts indicator to track conservation of useful plants  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
The Biodiversity Indicators Partnership officially adopted in July a new indicator to track progress on the conservation of thousands of economically and culturally important... more
Study suggests economic growth benefits wildlife but growing human populations do not  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
In a world first, researchers at ZSL and UCL compared changes in bird and mammal populations with socio-economic trends in low- and lower-middle income... more
A voracious Cambrian predator, Cambroraster, is a new species from the Burgess Shale  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Fossils of a large new predatory species in half-a-billion-year-old rocks have been uncovered from Kootenay National Park in the Canadian Rockies. This... more
Overturning the truth on conservation tillage  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Conservation tillage does not lower yield in modern cropping systems. more
Animal friendships 'change with the weather' in the Masai Mara  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
When it comes to choosing which other species to hang out with, wild animals quite literally change their minds with the weather, a new study reveals. The findings... more
Biosynthesized fibers inspired strong and tough artificial nanocomposite fibers  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
High-performance biomass-based nanocomposites are emerging as promising materials for future structural and functional applications due to their environmentally friendly, renewable and sustainable characteristics. Bio-sourced nanocelluloses (a kind of nanofibers) obtained... more
Two rare white rhinos pregnant at Belgian zoo  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Two rare southern white rhinos have become pregnant at the same time at a zoo in Belgium, boosting efforts to save the endangered species. more
Capacity what? The intangible side of conservation  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Fauna & Flora International (FFI) believes in partnership—we always have and we always will. In 2018, we partnered with almost 400 organisations, businesses or governmental agencies. We favour this partnership approach because—put simply—it works... more
Conservation biologists find new applications for AI tools  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Automated cameras and other sensors deployed in the wild are transforming the way biologists monitor natural ecosystems and animal populations. These technologies can collect huge amounts of data, however, and conservation biologists... more
Vaquita porpoise about to go extinct, researchers warn  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
The vaquita porpoise, one of the world's most endangered animals, could become extinct within a year if fishing nets continue being used illegally, a university in Scotland warned on Wednesday. more
Overturning the truth on conservation tillage  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Just as we blend, cut, and fold ingredients together to follow a recipe, farmers use equipment to stir together soil and crop residue (stalks and roots of previous crops) before planting. This mechanical action is called... more
Researchers raise the heat on molten metals to forge future technologies  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Solid-state materials are important for developing new technologies, from renewable energy applications to electronics. Manufacturing these advanced materials often requires metal-flux synthesis, a complex process that... more
A voracious Cambrian predator, Cambroraster, is a new species from the Burgess Shale  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Palaeontologists at the Royal Ontario Museum and University of Toronto have uncovered fossils of a large new predatory species in half-a-billion-year-old rocks... more
Conservation or construction? Deciding waterbird hotspots  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Scientists show that conservation and construction decisions should rely on multiple approaches to determine waterbird 'hotspots,' not just on one analysis method as is often done. more
Bangladesh 'extremely worried' over low male tiger population  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
A lower-than-expected population of male Bengal tigers in the world's largest mangrove forest has sparked fears about the long-term viability of the endangered species in Bangladesh, officials said Tuesday. more
Conservation or construction? Deciding waterbird hotspots  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Imagine your favorite beach filled with thousands of ducks and gulls. Now envision coming back a week later and finding condos being constructed on that spot. This many ducks in one place surely should indicate this... more
Increasing value of ivory poses major threat to elephant populations  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
The global price of ivory increased tenfold since its 1989 trade ban by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), new research has found. more
Battle to rescue wildlife at India's flood-hit animal park  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Wildlife officers are racing against time to rescue animals caught in floodwaters from torrential monsoon rains in India's famed Kaziranga National Park as the death toll rose to 215. more
Increasing value of ivory poses major threat to elephant populations  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
The global price of ivory increased tenfold since its 1989 trade ban by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), new research has found. The... more
Some good conservation news: India's tiger numbers are going up  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Indian tiger numbers are up, according to one of the most detailed wildlife surveys ever conducted. Tiger populations have risen by 6%, to roughly 3,000 animals. more
Tensions surge over Serbia's small hydropower plants  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Deep in the isolated forests of eastern Serbia a digger gouges a channel through the trees for a pipeline to siphon river water, as the coal-reliant country's efforts to clean up its energy habit... more
Atomically thin three-dimensional membranes of van der Waals semiconductors by wafer-scale growth  Science Magazine · 4 weeks
We report wafer-scale growth of atomically thin, three-dimensional (3D) van der Waals (vdW) semiconductor membranes. By controlling the growth kinetics in the near-equilibrium limit... more
Satellite-connected tags set to boost marine conservation  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Four tiger sharks have been tagged with a new device that will help conservationists to conduct detailed analysis of their migrations over years. more
Satellite-connected tags set to boost marine conservation  ESA · 4 weeks
Four tiger sharks have been tagged with a new device that will help conservationists to conduct detailed analysis of their migrations over... more
High-performance flow batteries offer path to grid-level renewable energy storage  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
A low-cost, high-performance battery chemistry could one day lead to scalable grid-level storage for wind and solar energy that could help electrical utilities reduce their dependency on fossil... more
Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 weeks
Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose... more
Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threaten biodiversity  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose... more
Elephant extinction will raise carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
One of the last remaining megaherbivores, forest elephants shape their environment by serving as seed dispersers and forest bulldozers as they eat over a hundred species of fruit, trample bushes,... more
Antarctic krill use 'hotspots' for their young  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
New research, published this week (24 July 2019) in the journal PLOS ONE, shows how Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), a key species in the Southern Ocean food web, choose different areas of the ocean... more
Tuna are spawning in marine protected areas  PHYS.ORG · 4 weeks
Marine protected areas are large swaths of coastal seas or open ocean that are protected by governments from activities such as commercial fishing and mining. Such marine sanctuaries have had rehabilitating effects on at-risk... more
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