Biology
Triclosan added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Grocery store aisles are stocked with products that promise to kill bacteria. People snap up those items to protect themselves from the germs that make them sick. However,... more
Studies explore physiological dangers that climate change will have on animal life  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 hours
A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans. The... more
Biologist uses new grant to find ways to eliminate schistosomiasis  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 hours
A biologist at The University of Texas at Arlington is using a new grant to look for ways to finish off a disease that has stubbornly resisted all... more
Researchers uncover interspecies communication between gut bacteria and host  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 hours
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do. more
Onset of puberty depends on gap between parents' and child's height  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 hours
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev researchers have found that the age puberty hits is based on the gap between the parents' and child's ultimate height, not... more
Successful testing of multi-organ "human-on-a-chip" could replace animals as test subjects  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
The replacement of animals as test subjects is one step closer to reality with the successful testing of multi-organ "human-on-a-chip" models to recapitulate the 28-day experiments... more
Frog-skin bacteria more diverse in cold and variable temperature regions, finds study  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research... more
A comprehensive, multinational review of peppers around the world  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
A comprehensive and multinational review of peppers/chilis (Capsicum species) with academic and scientific input from points across the globe, such as Argentina, Brazil, Taiwan, Mexico, Italy, Hungary, Austria, and the... more
Newly designed molecule could benefit people with Friedrich's Ataxia  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a... more
New blood test detects genetic disorders in fetuses  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a new blood test for genetic disorders that may allow parents to learn about the health of their baby as early as 11 weeks into pregnancy. more
Vitamin D supplementation less effective in the presence of obesity, shows study  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
A new Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study confirms that vitamin D supplementation is less effective in the presence of obesity, and it... more
Phase 1 data reinforce safety profile of new drug for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have few treatment options. Medications currently available or in development either target only a... more
Study doesn’t find enough evidence related to effects of noncaloric sweeteners on gut microbiota  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 hours
The study, carried out by the UGR professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Ángel Gil and his research team, has... more
News study reanalyzes the effects of noncaloric sweeteners on gut microbiota  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 hours
There is currently not enough evidence related to the effects of noncaloric sweeteners on appetite, short‑term intake, and risk of suffering from cancer or diabetes, as... more
Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
Paleobiologists have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington,... more
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 hours
Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors... more
Focusing on the fovea  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
Using high-throughput genetic sequencing methods, scientists have created the first cellular atlas of the primate retina, an important foundation for researchers to build on as they seek to understand how vision works in primates, including humans, and how vision can... more
Chemical added to consumer products impairs response to antibiotic treatment  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Triclosan exposure may inadvertently drive bacteria into a state in which they are able to tolerate normally lethal concentrations of antibiotics -- including those antibiotics that are commonly... more
Research creates DNA-like molecule to aid search for alien life  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
In a research breakthrough funded by NASA, scientists have synthesized a molecular system that, like DNA, can store and transmit information. This unprecedented feat suggests there could be... more
Too hot for comfort: The physiological dangers of extreme heat  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans. more
Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
New research finds that some yeast picked up a whole suite of genes from bacteria that gave them the new ability to scavenge iron... more
GI neuroimmune disruption contributes to Gulf War Illness  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
Many Persian Gulf War veterans experience Gulf War Illness (GWI), a chronic condition with symptoms ranging from gastrointestinal to neurological. While exposure to the anti-nerve gas pyridostigmine bromide (PB) is linked to... more
Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, researchers... more
Scientists Have Created Synthetic DNA with 4 Extra Letters  LIVE SCIENCE · 13 hours
Will scientists ever be able to create 'better' DNA in the lab than evolution did in nature? more
Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
How do fruit flies grow their wings? Scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases. Even when scientists manipulate cells... more
Sun Protection to patients with rare genetic disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy... more
Giant tortoise thought extinct is found on Galapagos  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Conservationists in the Galapagos Islands have found a giant tortoise from a species thought to have become extinct more than a century ago. more
Genetic defect linked to pediatric liver disease identified  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, in collaboration with several other institutions, have discovered a genetic defect linked to Biliary atresia, the most common pediatric cause of end-stage liver... more
How bird feather patterns form  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
According to a new study, the precise patterning of bird feathers relies on signaling through ectodysplasin (EDA) and its receptor EDAR -- the same signaling pathway known to be crucial for the formation of hair follicles, teeth and... more
Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
Scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago... more
Dueling dates for a huge eruption reignite the debate over dinosaurs’ death  SCIENCE-NEWS · 14 hours
New dating techniques for the Deccan Traps volcanic eruptions disagree on whether they were the main culprit in the dinosaurs’ demise. more
Hachimoji DNA and RNA: A genetic system with eight building blocks  Science Magazine · 14 hours
We report DNA- and RNA-like systems built from eight nucleotide "letters" (hence the name "hachimoji") that form four orthogonal pairs. These synthetic systems meet the structural... more
A pharmacological master key mechanism that unlocks the selectivity filter gate in K+ channels  Science Magazine · 14 hours
Potassium (K+) channels have been evolutionarily tuned for activation by diverse biological stimuli, and pharmacological activation is thought to target... more
U-Pb constraints on pulsed eruption of the Deccan Traps across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction  Science Magazine · 14 hours
Temporal correlation between some continental flood basalt eruptions and mass extinctions has been proposed to indicate causality, with eruptive volatile... more
Ubiquitin-dependent chloroplast-associated protein degradation in plants  Science Magazine · 14 hours
Chloroplasts contain thousands of nucleus-encoded proteins that are imported from the cytosol by translocases in the chloroplast envelope membranes. Proteolytic regulation of the translocases is critically important, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We... more
Dietary fiber helps to aggregate gut particles, study shows  NEWS MEDICAL · 14 hours
Food, microbes, and medicine all clump together as they move through our gut. Sticky molecules secreted into our intestines bind the gut particles in the same way that flour holds... more
How coral bleaching threatens Caribbean communities  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
A new study uses environmental, socioeconomic and management data from 30 Caribbean islands to identify which communities may be most at risk from the social and ecological effects of coral bleaching, which occurs when warm water... more
Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals. Scientists have discovered that both foxes... more
New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts; they can also tell the genes in their mammalian... more
Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird -- the now extinct adzebill -- showing that some of its closest living relatives... more
Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
UC Berkeley scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million... more
Too hot for comfort: the physiological dangers of extreme heat  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans. The review is published in... more
How bird feather patterns form  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird's skin, but it has been unclear how this happens. According to a new study published... more
Using E. coli to create bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Mechanical engineers are working on genetically engineering and optimizing E. coli bacteria to produce bioproducts, like biodiesel, in a cost-effective manner. more
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research... more
Method assesses health and size of lizard populations  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are... more
New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian... more
Pioneering study could offer protection to patients with rare genetic disease  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A (AVA) radiation in laboratory... more
Cretaceous Marsupial Lived Above Arctic Circle  SCI-NEWS.COM · 17 hours
Paleontologists have uncovered a new species of marsupial that lived during the Cretaceous period above the Arctic Circle, the farthest north marsupials have ever... more
Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
An international team of scientists has shown that fossilized eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals. more
Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
The idea that children inherit half of their DNA from each parent is a central tenet of modern genetics. But a team led by KAUST's Christian Frøkjær-Jensen has re-engineered this heredity pattern in roundworms, a commonly... more
Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
An insect's gut might seem an inhospitable place to settle in, but diverse microbes nonetheless make their home there. Yet in the gut, there's... more
Fruit fly wing research reshapes understanding of how organs form  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
How do fruit flies grow their wings? Rutgers scientists discovered a surprising answer that could one day help diagnose and treat human genetic diseases. more
Reduced antibody adaptability may make the elderly more vulnerable to influenza  NEWS MEDICAL · 17 hours
The influenza vaccine may be less effective in the elderly because their B cells are less capable of producing antibodies that can adapt to protect against... more
Radio-tracking dolphins reveals intimate details about their behavior  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
The most extensive radio-tracking effort of bottlenose dolphins in the Indian River Lagoon using radio-telemetry reveals new and surprising information about how they use their habitats, how they spend their time, and... more
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
A newly discovered, diminutive -- by T. rex standards -- relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came... more
Complete world map of tree diversity  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
Researchers have succeeded in constructing, from scattered data, a world map of the diversity of tree species. Climate plays a central role for its global distribution; however, the number of species in a specific region also... more
Biodegradable Mardi Gras beads update  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
LSU Department of Biological Sciences Professor Naohiro Kato is refining the process to make biodegradable Mardi Gras beads. He has patent applications pending on various formulations and methods of making the biodegradable beads that could help prevent tens... more
Applying computational chemistry to simulate realistic chemical processes  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
The waters of science are muddy these days—especially at the University of California San Diego where all that separates a chemist from a physicist in some cases is office drywall. Chemists ask... more
Good news: Habitats worthy of protection in Germany are protected  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
The world's largest coordinated network of protected areas is not located at the South Pole or in Australia, Africa, Asia or on the American continents – but in... more
Understanding peppers and chilis from around the world  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
A comprehensive and multinational review of peppers/chilis (Capsicum species) with academic and scientific input from points across the globe, such as Argentina, Brazil, Taiwan, Mexico, Italy, Hungary, Austria, and the United States... more
Dietary fiber helps clump material in your gut  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Food, microbes, and medicine all clump together as they move through our gut. Sticky molecules secreted into our intestines bind the gut particles in the same way that flour holds a ball... more
Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics  nanowerk · 19 hours
Self-healing fabric, abrasion-resistant coatings, precision drug delivery and smart textiles are among the potential applications of squid 'ring tooth' protein. more
Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird – the now extinct adzebill – showing that some of its closest living relatives... more
Even coral reefs are affected by socio-economics  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Marine biologists working to save the world's coral reefs say that they are increasingly being affected by human activities. As a result, the marine biologists now need to include an assessment of the effects... more
Bacteria can survive starvation in zombie mode  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Bacteria that are exposed to a hostile environment, for example with antibiotics or very few nutrients, can sometimes survive by 'going to sleep." Biologists from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) have discovered an unknown,... more
A deer-sized T. rex ancestor shows how fast tyrannosaurs became giants  SCIENCE-NEWS · 20 hours
A newly found dinosaur called Moros intrepidus fills a hole in the evolutionary history of tyrannosaurs, helping narrow when the group sized up. more
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex  PHYS.ORG · 20 hours
A newly discovered, diminutive—by T. rex standards—relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North... more
New study—how to save a seabird  PHYS.ORG · 21 hours
In the 1990s, the endangered status of the short-tailed albatross catalyzed efforts to reduce the number of birds accidentally killed as bycatch in Alaska, home to the country's biggest fisheries. Marine fisheries scientist Ed Melvin, at... more
Life-changing magic of tidying up—complex structural organization studied in slime mold  PHYS.ORG · 21 hours
Researchers in Japan think they have found an answer to the fundamental biological question of how individual cells know which way to position themselves within a... more
Fat bats withstand the effects of white-nose syndrome, study finds  PHYS.ORG · 21 hours
Although white-nose syndrome (WNS) has pushed some bat populations to extinction, researchers have found that higher fat stores are helping some little brown bats to survive this deadly... more
This Fish Just Gave Evolution the Finger and Got Pregnant  LIVE SCIENCE · 21 hours
Mary's species of fish never evolved to have sex or incubate live young. She did it anyway. more
Complete world map of tree diversity  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Biodiversity is one of Earth's most precious resources. However, for most places in the world, scientists only have a tiny picture of what this diversity actually is. Researchers at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research... more
Researchers develop new neuro-inspired system to detect temporal patterns  NEWS MEDICAL · 22 hours
A new methodology to classify temporal patterns inspired by brain circuits has been developed to help understand the mechanisms that underlie biological learning. more
Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic, finds a review published in Frontiers in Chemistry. Originating in the... more
Thousands with chronic UTIs are not receiving the treatment they need  NEWS MEDICAL · 24 hours
Many women may not be receiving the treatment they need because the gold-standard tests for UTIs fail to detect a significant proportion of bacteria. more
Drug increases melanin production in some people with albinism  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A small pilot clinical study at the National Eye Institute suggests that the drug nitisinone increases melanin production in some people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1B, a rare genetic disease... more
Researchers discover several genes linked to increased use of alcohol and tobacco  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The use of alcohol and tobacco is closely linked to several diseases, and is a contributing factor in many deaths. more
Study finds new genetic clues associated with asthma in African ancestry populations  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
In the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found new clues into the parts of... more
Sir Charles Lyell's historical fossils (London's Natural History Museum) accessible online  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
More than 1,700 animal and plant specimens from the collection of eminent British geologist Sir Charles Lyell—known as the pioneer of modern geology—were organised, digitised and... more
Report: US company to stop sales of genetic tech in Xinjiang  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. says it will no longer sell or service genetic sequencers in China's mostly Muslim region of Xinjiang following criticism that they were... more
Study gives a snapshot of crocodile evolution  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The story that's often told about crocodiles is that they're among the most perfectly adapted creatures on the planet - living fossils that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years. more
Researchers discover a new promising target to improve HIV vaccines  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
In the quest to develop an effective HIV vaccine, researchers have focused attention on identifying and targeting the region of the virus's outer envelope where a lineage of... more
AlgaeDNAWhalesCRISPR
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex
PHYS.ORG
Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness
PHYS.ORG
Earth first origins project seeks to replicate the cradle of life
PHYS.ORG
How to fight climate change in agriculture while protecting jobs
PHYS.ORG
In an Australian first, the ACT may legally recognise animals' feelings
PHYS.ORG
Tracking pollen with quantum dots
SCIENCE DAILY
They call it puppy love, but what is it really?
PHYS.ORG
Mapping historical changes in dark matter
PHYS.ORG
Vets can do more to reduce the suffering of flat-faced dog breeds
PHYS.ORG
ESA’s Mars rover has a name – Rosalind Franklin
ESA
Fossil fuels are bad for your health and harmful in many ways besides climate change
PHYS.ORG
When does noise become a message?
PHYS.ORG
Female manakins use male mating call when implanted with male hormones
PHYS.ORG
Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions
PHYS.ORG
Time-lapse microscopy helps reveal brake mechanism in Streptomyces lifecycle
PHYS.ORG
UH marine mammal research captures rare video of newborn humpback whale
PHYS.ORG
Cloning monkeys for research puts humans on a slippery ethical slope
PHYS.ORG
New type of map connects the dots in cellular reprogramming
PHYS.ORG
How we traced the underwater volcanic ancestry of Lord Howe Island
PHYS.ORG
'Light tweezers' can move, melt, and scatter mysterious biological 'icebergs'
PHYS.ORG
Fresh