Biology
Adults carrying Alzheimer's risk gene have harder time accessing recently acquired knowledge  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 hours
Adults carrying a gene associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease had a harder time accessing recently acquired knowledge, even though they didn't... more
Exploiting mammalian low-complexity domains for liquid-liquid phase separation-driven underwater adhesive coatings  Science Magazine · 6 hours
Many biological materials form via liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), followed by maturation into a solid-like state. Here, using a biologically inspired assembly mechanism designed to recapitulate... more
Organ-on-e-chip: Three-dimensional self-rolled biosensor array for electrical interrogations of human electrogenic spheroids  Science Magazine · 6 hours
Cell-cell communication plays a pivotal role in coordination and function of biological systems. Three-dimensional (3D) spheroids provide venues to explore cellular communication for tissue... more
This rat is foiling developers' plans to capitalize on a weaker Endangered Species Act  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Southern California developers have long sought relief from regulations protecting wildlife, and earlier this month the Trump administration obliged, formally... more
Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
When energy is added to uranium under pressure, it creates a shock wave, and even a tiny sample will be vaporized like a small explosion. By using smaller, controlled explosions, physicists can... more
Breath! Respiring microbes generate more energy  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
How do cells generate and use energy? This question might seem simple, but the answer is far from simple. Furthermore, knowing how microbial cell factories consume energy and how proteins are allocated to do so is... more
Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from... more
Physicists Determine Maximum Possible Mass for Lightest Neutrino  SCI-NEWS.COM · 8 hours
Using data from the large scale structure of galaxies, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Type Ia supernovae, and Big Bang... more
Frying oil consumption worsened colon cancer and colitis in mice, study shows  SCIENCE DAILY · 9 hours
Food scientists have shown that feeding frying oil to mice exaggerated colonic inflammation, enhanced tumor growth and worsened gut leakage, spreading bacteria or toxic... more
Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Biologists have shed new light on a crucial aspect of the plant immune response. Their discovery, revealing how plant resistance proteins trigger localized cell death, could lead to new strategies for engineering... more
Malaria control success in Africa at risk from spread of multi-drug resistance  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum parasites that inhabit different... more
Larval Bees are Omnivores, Shows New Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 10 hours
Pollen-borne microbes represent an important protein source for larval bees, according to new research. Of the more than 20,000 species of bees... more
Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies that potentially can correct a defect at a single nucleotide... more
Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behavior across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers used advanced single-cell technology to isolate individual parasites and... more
How red-eared invaders are hurting California's native turtles  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Western pond turtles got fatter and healthier after scientists removed nearly 200 invasive red-eared slider turtles from the UC Davis Arboretum, reports a new study. The study is the first to quantify... more
The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
In what likely is the first study on the evolution of dietary preferences across the animal kingdom, researchers report several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a... more
Artificial trees capture new bird species on candid camera  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
An experiment from The Australian National University (ANU) using artificial trees has attracted birds and other wildlife never before seen in a damaged Canberra landscape—catching them on camera at the... more
UN: Ebola outbreak in Congo has killed nearly 2,000 people  ABC NEWS · 10 hours
The World Health Organization's emergencies chief said the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Congo is approaching a "stark" milestone with nearly 2,000 people killed by the virus in the... more
Plants are going extinct up to 350 times faster than the historical norm  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Earth is seeing an unprecedented loss of species, which some ecologists are calling a sixth mass extinction. In May, a United Nations... more
Birds balance sexiness and predator avoidance by changing color  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Most birds remain the same color year-round, replacing their feathers only once a year. more
Scientists find longevity biomarkers  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
An international group of scientists studied the effects of 17 lifespan-extending interventions on gene activity in mice and discovered genetic biomarkers of longevity. The results of their study were published in the journal Cell Metabolism. more
To ban or not to ban genetically modified crops? That's not the question  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
The South Australian government recently announced its intention to lift the long-standing statewide moratorium on genetically modified (GM) crops, following a statutory... more
Key areas of measles virus polymerase to target for antiviral drug development  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
Targeting specific areas of the measles virus polymerase, a protein complex that copies the viral genome, can effectively fight the measles virus and be... more
Big brains or big guts: Choose one  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
A global study comparing 2,062 birds finds that, in highly variable environments, birds tend to have either larger or smaller brains relative to their body size. Birds with smaller brains tend to use ecological... more
The fat of the land: Estimating the ecological costs of overeating  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
Researchers have proposed a way to measure the ecological impact of global food wastage due to excessive consumption. The results suggest that direct food waste --... more
Using CRISPR to program gels with new functions  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
The CRISPR genome-editing system is best-known for its potential to correct disease-causing mutations and add new genes into living cells. Now, a team from MIT and Harvard University has deployed CRISPR for... more
After using tools, crows behave more optimistically, study suggests  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
It's no secret crows are smart. They're notorious for frustrating attempts to keep them from tearing into garbage cans; more telling, however, is that they are one of the few... more
Living Cells Can Record and Track Genomic Events with New “Designer Cell” Computer Technology  NEWS MEDICAL · 12 hours
Published in Molecular Cell, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a new technology that uses DNA to... more
High diversity of harvestmen in Atlantic Rainforest and ancient geological events  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
In the southern Atlantic Rainforest remnants between Rio de Janeiro State in Southeast Brazil and Santa Catarina State in South Brazil, there are some 600 species... more
New approach to detection reveals unreported Zika outbreak in 2017  NEWS MEDICAL · 13 hours
Public health experts in the US have discovered that the Zika virus may still be spreading in the Americas, despite case reporting having approached close to zero. more
Measuring the ecological impact of global food wastage due to excessive consumption  NEWS MEDICAL · 13 hours
With every unfinished meal since Band Aid, you've heard it: "people are starving in Africa, y'know". True, the UN estimates that rich countries throw... more
Animal-assisted interventions help reduce patient stress in aeromedical staging facilities  NEWS MEDICAL · 13 hours
They're physically and emotionally wounded – most likely suffering from post-traumatic stress. Members of the United States military who serve abroad often return to the U.S. to treat... more
Scientists a step closer to saving northern white rhino from extinction  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Veterinarians have successfully harvested eggs from the last two surviving northern white rhinos, taking them one step closer to bringing the species back from the brink... more
Big brains or big guts: Choose one  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Big brains can help an animal mount quick, flexible behavioral responses to frequent or unexpected environmental changes. But some birds just don't need 'em. more
UQ researchers discover how our genes, environment influence BMI and height  NEWS MEDICAL · 15 hours
Environmental conditions influence our body mass index by increasing or decreasing the effect of inherited genetic variations, University of Queensland researchers have discovered. more
Super-powered immune cells to attack tumors  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
The phase 1 clinical trial will test the feasibility and safety of CAR-T cells - genetically modified white blood cells harvested from a patient's own blood with the unique ability to directly attack and kill cancers... more
Researchers create synthetic biologic system to deliver medicine, treat wounds for soldiers  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
For the first time, scientists built a synthetic biologic system with compartments like real cells. This Army project at the University of Massachusetts Amherst... more
The fat of the land: Estimating the ecological costs of overeating  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
With every unfinished meal since Band Aid, you've heard it: "people are starving in Africa, y'know". True, the UN estimates that rich countries throw away nearly... more
Harnessing power of CRISPR to control behavior of DNA-responsive materials  NEWS MEDICAL · 17 hours
The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies... more
Study sheds light on emergence and spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites in Africa  NEWS MEDICAL · 19 hours
In the first continent-wide genomic study of malaria parasites in Africa, scientists have uncovered the genetic features of Plasmodium falciparum parasites that... more
Combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis may lead to higher remission rates  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
Researchers at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and RTI International, a nonprofit research institute, recently found that patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may... more
Florida scientists induce spawning of Atlantic coral in lab for first time  REUTERS · 22 hours
Scientists in Florida have artificially induced reproductive spawning of an endangered Atlantic coral species for the first time in an aquarium setting, a breakthrough... more
Medical News Today: Study links insomnia genes to heart disease, stroke risk  MNT · 23 hours
New research using a genetic analysis called Mendelian randomization links insomnia genes to a greater risk of heart disease and stroke. more
Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. SIV's Nef... more
Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm  NPR · 1 day
NPR got exclusive access to the only lab known to be trying to edit the DNA in human sperm, which raises all... more
Genes tell the story of how the Asian tiger mosquito spread  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Over the last 40 years, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has invaded every continent thanks to the transportation of its eggs via human trade and... more
Yet another way dogs help the military: aeromedical patient evacuations  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Animal-assisted therapy has many benefits in health care. Yet, its biological and psychosocial effects in the military are unknown, especially for injured, airlifted patients. Researchers teamed up with... more
Carriers of Alzheimer's genetic marker have greater difficulty harnessing past knowledge  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Adults carrying a gene associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease had a harder time accessing recently acquired knowledge, even though they didn't show any... more
Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have... more
New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A new computational tool called ProtFus screens scientific literature to validate predictions about the activity of fusion proteins -- proteins encoded by the joining of two genes that previously encoded... more
Study finds genetic links to childhood obesity across different ethnicities  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
An international team of researchers who analyzed data across multiple ethnicities has produced the largest genetic study to date associated with common childhood obesity. more
Research team develops microbiome-based index for assessing skin health  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Microbiomes aren't just for understanding and modulating gut health - skin, our largest organ, hosts a vibrant and complex microbiome that can provide health insights. An international research team has... more
New model developed to optimize and personalize radiotherapy for cancer patients  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A personalized approach to cancer treatment has become more common over the last several decades, with numerous targeted drugs approved to treat particular tumor types with... more
Ludwig study uncovers novel vulnerability in MYC-driven cancers  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a novel vulnerability in tumors that are driven by a common cancer gene known as MYC. Such cancers, it found, are highly dependent on the... more
Virginia Tech professor wins NSF grant to study biofilm formation in bacteria  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Should I stay or should I go? This is a common question people ask themselves in their journey through life, but bacteria are also... more
Elevated Levels of Oxygen Gave Rise to North American Dinosaurs, Scientists Say  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
A team of researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of Texas Austin has used a new technique to analyze tiny amounts of... more
N6-methyladenosine RNA modification-mediated cellular metabolism rewiring inhibits viral replication  Science Magazine · 1 day
Host cell metabolism can be modulated by viral infection, affecting viral survival or clearance. The cellular metabolism rewiring mediated by N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification in virus-host interaction remains largely unknown. Here... more
NAD+ cleavage activity by animal and plant TIR domains in cell death pathways  Science Magazine · 1 day
SARM1 (sterile alpha and TIR motif containing 1) is responsible for depletion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized form (NAD+) during... more
Programmable CRISPR-responsive smart materials  Science Magazine · 1 day
Stimuli-responsive materials activated by biological signals play an increasingly important role in biotechnology applications. We exploit the programmability of CRISPR-associated nucleases to actuate hydrogels containing DNA as a structural element or as an anchor for pendant groups. After activation by... more
The Malaria Cell Atlas: Single parasite transcriptomes across the complete Plasmodium life cycle  Science Magazine · 1 day
Malaria parasites adopt a remarkable variety of morphological life stages as they transition through multiple mammalian host and mosquito vector environments. We... more
Phospho-dependent phase separation of FMRP and CAPRIN1 recapitulates regulation of translation and deadenylation  Science Magazine · 1 day
Membraneless organelles involved in RNA processing are biomolecular condensates assembled by phase separation. Despite the important role of intrinsically disordered protein regions... more
The global soil community and its influence on biogeochemistry  Science Magazine · 1 day
Soil organisms represent the most biologically diverse community on land and govern the turnover of the largest organic matter pool in the terrestrial biosphere. The highly complex nature of these... more
New tool mines scientific texts for fusion protein facts  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A new computational tool called ProtFus screens scientific literature to validate predictions about the activity of fusion proteins—proteins encoded by the joining of two genes that previously encoded two separate... more
Biomaterials smarten up with CRISPR  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The CRISPR-Cas system has become the go-to tool for researchers who study genes in an ever-growing list of organisms, and is being used to develop new gene therapies that potentially can correct a defect at a single nucleotide... more
Map of malaria behavior set to revolutionize research  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The first detailed map of individual malaria parasite behaviour across each stage of its complicated life cycle has been created by scientists. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators used... more
Structure of protein nanoturbine revealed  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Cells rely on protein complexes known as ATP synthases or ATPases for their energy needs. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules power most of the processes sustaining life. Structural biologist Professor Leonid Sazanov and his research group from the Institute... more
Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Plants, like humans and animals, have over millions of years evolved complex immune systems that fend off invading pathogens. But unlike many animals, plants lack adaptive immunity conferred by antibodies. This means... more
Tracing the evolution of vision in fruit flies  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. However, there remain questions about other biological functions of this family of proteins... more
US environmental groups sue over wildlife protection rollbacks  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
US environmental groups have sued the administration of President Donald Trump over rollbacks that weaken the Endangered Species Act, a law credited with saving iconic species from the bald eagle to the... more
Using CRISPR to program gels with new functions  MIT · 1 day
Smart materials change properties in response to specific DNA sequences; could be used in a variety of devices. more
Storms on Jupiter are disturbing the planet's colorful belts  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Coordinated observations of Jupiter in early 2017 by six ground-based telescopes and Hubble allowed astronomers to study the evolution of bright plumes and connect them with cloud movements deep in... more
Adaptation to life inside cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A large-scale study of the genetic differences and similarities among E. coli bacteria from cattle and humans indicates that features... more
Adaptation to life in cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Research led by Kyushu University finds that E. coli from cattle share widespread genetic similarities with those that cause food... more
Scientists successfully innoculate, grow crops in salt-damaged soil  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world. Scientists have used bacteria found in the roots of salt-tolerant plants to successfully... more
Tracing the evolution of vision  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
The function of the visual photopigment rhodopsin and its action in the retina to facilitate vision is well understood. However, there remain questions about other biological functions of this family of proteins (opsins) and this has ramifications for... more
Ginkgo biloba may aid in treating type 2 diabetes  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Ginkgo Biloba, one of the oldest living trees species, may offer some clues in better treatments for Type 2 Diabetes, says one researcher. more
Genetic diversity couldn't save Darwin's finches  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers found that Charles Darwin's famous finches defy what has long been considered a key to evolutionary success: genetic diversity. The study of the finches of the Galapagos Islands could change the way conservation biologists think... more
Comparison of three similar frontline breast cancer drugs reveals important differences  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
First head-to-head comparison of CDK4/6 inhibitors in cell line and animal models of breast cancer reveals important differences, including one drug that exhibits unique, potentially advantageous... more
An unreported Zika outbreak in 2017 detected through travel surveillance and genetics  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
By sequencing virus genomes from infected travelers, analyzing travel patterns and mosquito modeling, researchers unearthed a spike in Zika cases from travelers returning from... more
High-precision technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers have created a technology called DOMINO to store complex 'memories' in the DNA of living cells, including human cells. This memory storage capacity can form the foundation of complex circuits that trigger a... more
Wildlife meeting backs more protection for giraffes  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Wildlife-supporting countries on Thursday backed regulating international trade in giraffes in a bid to offer more protection to the gentle giants, feared to be facing a "silent extinction". more
Hundreds of Pyrenees livestock farmers protest predator bears  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Hundreds of Spanish livestock farmers staged a protest Thursday in the Pyrenees town of Ainsa against the re-introduction of brown bears to the mountain region saying the predators are a menace to... more
Study started for bacteria-free space missions  ESA · 1 day
Bacteria grow everywhere, including inside the International Space Station. That is why ESA has selected the Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST) to... more
Geologists get called 'dirty polluters', but we're needed to fight climate change  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
When people hear we are geologists, we are often asked if we have found any oil lately. Sadly—and wrongly—the most common view of geology... more
Researchers reveal plant defense toolkit and insights for fighting crop diseases  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
At an unprecedented scale, researchers have now cataloged the array of surveillance tools that plants use to detect disease-causing microbes across an entire species. Representing a... more
Atacama Desert microbes may hold clues to life on Mars  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Microbial life on Mars may potentially be transported across the planet on dust particles carried by wind, according to a study conducted in the Atacama Desert in North... more
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