Biology
New York to get one of world's most ambitious carbon reduction plans  PHYS.ORG · 25 minutes
New York state lawmakers on Wednesday passed one of the world's most ambitious laws aimed at countering climate change, under which fossil fuel power... more
New strategy for efficient production of fatty acids and biofuels from glucose  NEWS MEDICAL · 59 minutes
Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel,... more
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology  SCIENCE DAILY · 8 hours
A team has compiled a roadmap for the future of synthetic or engineering biology, based on the input of 80 leaders in the field from more than 30... more
Scientists record singing by rare right whale for first time  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Federal marine biologists have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on the planet. more
Neutrons get a wider angle on DNA and RNA to advance 3-D models  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National... more
Novel Anti-Inflammatory Molecule Isolated from Soil-Dwelling Bacterium  SCI-NEWS.COM · 11 hours
About three decades after scientists coined the term ‘hygiene hypothesis’ to suggest that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, an international... more
NOAA Fisheries biologists record singing by rare right whale  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say they have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. more
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
Genetically engineered trees that provide fire-resistant lumber for homes. Modified organs that won't be rejected. Synthetic microbes that monitor your gut to detect invading disease organisms and kill... more
Single-cell imaging and characterization of Escherichia coli persister cells to ofloxacin in exponential cultures  Science Magazine · 13 hours
Bacterial persistence refers to the capacity of small subpopulations within clonal populations to tolerate antibiotics. Persisters are thought to originate... more
Defaunation precipitates the extinction of evolutionarily distinct interactions in the Anthropocene  Science Magazine · 13 hours
Species on Earth are interconnected with each other through ecological interactions. Defaunation can erode those connections, yet we lack evolutionary predictions about the consequences of losing... more
Adaptive switch to sexually dimorphic movements by partner-seeking termites  Science Magazine · 13 hours
How should females and males move to search for partners whose exact location is unknown? Theory predicts that the answer depends on what they know about where targets can be... more
Biophysical basis underlying dynamic Lck activation visualized by ZapLck FRET biosensor  Science Magazine · 13 hours
Lck plays crucial roles in TCR signaling. We developed a new and sensitive FRET biosensor (ZapLck) to visualize Lck kinase activity with high spatiotemporal resolutions in... more
Gregarious suspension feeding in a modular Ediacaran organism  Science Magazine · 13 hours
Reconstructing Precambrian eukaryotic paleoecology is pivotal to understanding the origins of the modern, animal-dominated biosphere. Here, we combine new fossil data from southern Namibia with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to test between... more
Archaea dominate oxic subseafloor communities over multimillion-year time scales  Science Magazine · 13 hours
Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) dominate microbial communities throughout oxic subseafloor sediment deposited over millions of years in the North Atlantic Ocean. Rates of nitrification correlated with the abundance of these dominant... more
Human migration in Oceania recreated through paper mulberry genetics  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
The migration and interaction routes of prehistoric humans throughout the islands of Oceania can be retraced using genetic differences between paper mulberry plants, a tree native to Asia cultivated for... more
Frog protein may mitigate dangers posed by toxic marine microbes  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
A new study from UC San Francisco suggests that a protein found in the common bullfrog may one day be used to detect and neutralize a poisonous compound... more
[Research Articles] Multi-organ system for the evaluation of efficacy and off-target toxicity of anticancer therapeutics  Science Magazine · 13 hours
A pumpless, reconfigurable, multi-organ–on–a–chip system containing recirculating serum-free medium can be used to predict preclinical on-target efficacy, metabolic... more
[Research Articles] Epigenetic activation and memory at a TGFB2 enhancer in systemic sclerosis  Science Magazine · 13 hours
In systemic sclerosis (SSc), previously healthy adults develop an inflammatory prodrome with subsequent progressive fibrosis of the skin and viscera. SSc has... more
Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion'  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist. more
Wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the... more
Finding 'Nemo's' family tree of anemones  PHYS.ORG · 13 hours
Thanks in part to the popular film Finding Nemo, clownfishes are well known to the public and well represented in scientific literature. But the same can't be said for the equally colorful sea anemones—venomous, tentacled animals—that... more
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Published today in Nature, researchers show that alien bird introductions are most successful in locations and climates similar to their native habitats and in places where other alien species are already established. more
Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report in the journal Ecology Letters. Even native plants that... more
Plate tectonics may have driven Cambrian Explosion, study shows  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist. more
Artificial muscles powered by glucose  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles. This advance may be a step on the way to implantable artificial muscles or autonomous microrobots powered by biomolecules... more
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Researchers report the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety... more
Why tiny microbes may be a big factor in how climate change unfolds  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Climate change is about big things: melting ice sheets, rising seas, the feverish temperature of the planet. more
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
The relation between collagen laxity and anxiety in humans is widely known, but this relation has never been observed before in other species. A team of researchers led by professors Jaume Fatjó... more
Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent... more
Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. A team studied just under 3000 marine fossils collected from Antarctica to understand... more
Scientists pinpoint cause of fatal respiratory disorder that turns babies' lips and skin blue  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn... more
Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production. more
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress  SCIENCE DAILY · 16 hours
When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production of reactive oxygen species by oxidizing... more
Researchers identify genes linked with survival in children with biliary atresia  NEWS MEDICAL · 16 hours
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have identified an expression pattern of 14 genes at the time of diagnosis that predicts two year, transplant-free survival... more
Artificial muscles powered by glucose  nanowerk · 16 hours
Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles. This advance may be a step on the way to implantable artificial muscles or autonomous microrobots powered by biomolecules... more
Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Researchers at the JCU Turtle Health Research Facility have conducted a first-of-its-kind study using what's known as phage therapy as an option for bacterial infections in... more
This Weird Animal Eats Rocks for Breakfast  LIVE SCIENCE · 17 hours
Rocks might not sound like a delectable meal to most life-forms, but it's on the menu for a newly identified species of a plump, bizarre-looking clam. more
Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn... more
Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
A world-first study has found an alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections in green sea turtles. more
Directed evolution comes to plants  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
A new platform for speeding up and controlling the evolution of proteins inside living plants has been developed by a KAUST-led team. more
How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Plasmas are created from gas that is pumped with energy. Today, plasmas are already used against multi-resistant pathogens in clinical applications, for example to treat chronic wounds. "Plasmas provide a complex cocktail of components,... more
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Plants are susceptible to stress, and with the global impact of climate change and humanity's growing demand for food, it's crucial to understand what causes plant stress and stress tolerance. When plants... more
Hyenas Once Lived above Arctic Circle  SCI-NEWS.COM · 17 hours
Paleontologists have found two fossilized teeth of extinct cursorial hyenas (genus Chasmaporthetes) in the remote Old Crow River region in northern Yukon Territory, Canada.... more
Troublesome trees: spread of forests contributed to ancient extinction  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Evidence from ancient rocks in north Alabama show the Earth's first forest spread rapidly, likely contributing to a mass extinction of shallow marine life some 370 million years ago. more
Shipworm that eats rock instead of wood found in river in the Philippines  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found and identified a species of shipworm that eats rock... more
56 new species of arachnids found in Western Australia  PHYS.ORG · 17 hours
Researchers at The University of Western Australia and the Western Australian Museum have discovered 56 new species of arachnids, known as schizomids, in Western Australia's Pilbara region. more
How personalities of wild small mammals affect forest structure  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
A mouse scampers through the forest, stopping suddenly at the sight of a tree seed on the ground. A potential meal. And a dilemma. more
Marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. more
Scientists make breakthrough in understanding the genetics of common syndromic autism  NEWS MEDICAL · 19 hours
Australian and Chilean scientists have made a breakthrough in their understanding of the genetics of a common form of syndromic autism – and they hope their... more
New environmental DNA program makes conservation research faster, more efficient  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
It's estimated that a person sheds between 30,000 to 40,000 skin cells per day. These cells and their associated DNA leave genetic traces of ourselves in showers, dust—pretty... more
Creating a physical and genetic map of Cannabis sativa  NEWS MEDICAL · 20 hours
Scientists have developed a physical and genetic map of Cannabis sativa to facilitate further investigation into the genetic and molecular mechanisms exhibited by this plant. more
FACS-based CRISPR screening shows how Chlamydia bacterium invades host cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
Using FACS-based CRISPR screening, scientists have identified three candidate genes that may facilitate the invasion of Chlamydia trachomatis into host cells. more
Harnessing the power of skin microbiome to develop new therapeutics  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
As scientific researchers continue to investigate the complexities of the skin microbiome, our mission for the 2nd Microbiome Movement – Skin Health & Dermatology Summit is simple: Build... more
Invitation to attend Microbiome Movement – Drug Development & Nutrition Summit in Singapore  NEWS MEDICAL · 21 hours
As the Program Director of the Microbiome Movement, I would like to formally invite you to join us an esteemed member of... more
Pup fostering gives genetic boost to wild Mexican wolves  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines—from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos... more
Corsica's 'cat-fox': On the trail of what may be a new species  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
In the forest undergrowth of northern Corsica, two wildlife rangers open a cage to reveal a striped, tawny-coated animal, one of 16 felines known... more
First book published on fishes of the Salish Sea  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
The first book documenting all of the known species of fishes that live in the Salish Sea is now available. more
Newly discovered antibody broadly inhibits multiple strains of pandemic norovirus  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health and their colleagues at the University of Texas at Austin and the... more
Study links high number of copies of chromosomal region to chemotherapeutic drug resistance  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, with the participation of collaborators from the Baylor College of Medicine and the University Institute... more
Researchers identify genetic mutation that causes fatal response to HAV infection  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus. more
Study provides new insight into the heritability of coronary artery disease  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A collaboration involving the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the German Heart Center Munich, AstraZeneca, and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has demonstrated that more... more
Gene associated with increased risk of cannabis abuse  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
New research from the Danish psychiatric project, iPSYCH, shows that a specific gene is associated with an increased risk of cannabis abuse. The gene is the source of a so-called nicotine receptor... more
Many healthcare workers often care for patients while sick, study finds  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Large numbers of healthcare workers risk transmitting respiratory viruses to patients and co-workers by attending work even when they have symptoms, according to a study published... more
Scientists develop new class of drugs to treat hereditary kidney disease  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Scientists from the University of Sheffield are part of an international collaboration to develop a new class of drugs to treat a common genetic kidney disease... more
Scientists challenge notion of binary sexuality with naming of new plant species  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Scientists have named a new plant species from the remote Outback. The description of the plant had confounded field biologists for decades because of... more
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Sea otters have very low genetic diversity, scientists report. Their findings have implications for the conservation of rare and endangered species, in which a... more
Wearable device reveals how seals prepare for diving  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A wearable noninvasive device based on near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to investigate blood volume and oxygenation patterns in freely diving marine mammals, according to a new study. more
A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern US corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to... more
Medical News Today: What causes a lump on the areola  MNT · 1 day
A lump on the areola may have a variety of causes, including skin irritation and bacteria. Treatments depend on the cause. Learn more about the causes and treatments... more
Dogs Evolved Sad Eyes to Manipulate Their Human Companions, Study Suggests  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
You don't get to be man's best friend without copying a few of man's favorite facial expressions. more
Hubble Observes Tiny Galaxy with Big Heart  ASTRO WATCH · 1 day
Nestled within this field of bright foreground stars lies ESO 495-21, a tiny galaxy with a big heart. ESO 495-21 may be... more
New evidence supports the presence of microbes in the placenta  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers report visual evidence supporting the presence of bacteria within the microarchitecture of the placental tissue. more
Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a... more
Egg-sucking sea slug from Florida's Cedar Key named after Muppets creator Jim Henson  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Feet from the raw bars and sherbet-colored condominiums of Florida's Cedar Key, researchers discovered a new species of egg-sucking sea slug, a... more
The Same Exact Foods Affect Each Person's Gut Bacteria Differently  LIVE SCIENCE · 1 day
Diet can influence the gut microbiome, but the same food can have the opposite effect on different people. more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Ecologists have long relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now the better option... more
How hepatitis B and delta viruses establish infection of liver cells  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers have developed a new, scalable cell culture system that allows for detailed investigation of how host cells respond to infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and... more
An ounce of prevention: Preoperative management of inflammation may stave off cancer recurrences  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Administering anti-inflammatory treatments that prevent inflammation as well as proresolution treatments that tamp down the body's inflammatory response to surgery or chemotherapy... more
Sea otters have low genetic diversity like other threatened species, biologists report  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Sea otters have low genetic diversity, which could endanger their health as a species, a UCLA-led team of life scientists has discovered. The findings... more
The fellowship of the wing: Pigeons flap faster to fly together  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
New research publishing June 18 in the open-access journal, PLOS Biology, led by Dr. Lucy Taylor from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology now reveals... more
Leaving microbes out of climate change conversation has major consequences, experts warn  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Leading microbiologists have issued a warning, saying that not including microbes -- the support system of the biosphere -- in the climate change equation... more
Wearable device reveals how seals prepare for diving  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A wearable non-invasive device based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to investigate blood volume and oxygenation patterns in freely diving marine mammals, according to a study publishing June 18 in... more
Biology of leptin, the hunger hormone, revealed  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
New research offers insight into leptin, a hormone that plays a key role in appetite, overeating, and obesity. The findings advance knowledge about leptin and weight gain, and also suggest a potential strategy for... more
Fossil teeth reveal ancient hyenas in the Arctic  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Modern hyenas are known as hunters and scavengers in Asian and African ecosystems such as the savanna. But in ancient times, these powerful carnivores also roamed a very different landscape, inhabiting the... more
Dinosaur bones are home to microscopic life  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Scientists went looking for preserved collagen, the protein in bone and skin, in dinosaur fossils. They didn't find the protein, but they did find huge colonies of modern bacteria living inside the dinosaur bones. more
Looming insect invasion threatens California wine and avocados  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers are testing whether a sesame seed-sized wasp can control a pest that could seriously damage California crops including wine, walnuts, and avocados. more
Monitoring biodiversity with sound: How machines can enrich our knowledge  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
For a long time, ecologists have relied on their senses when it comes to recording animal populations and species diversity. However, modern programmable sound recording devices are now... more
New insight from Great Barrier Reef coral provides correction factor to climate records  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Newly developed geological techniques help uncover the most accurate and high-resolution climate records to date, according to a new study. The research... more
Medical News Today: Garden snails may have secret weapons against aggressive bacteria  MNT · 2 days
Researchers have discovered four previously unknown proteins in snail mucus, at least three of which have the potential to fight harmful bacteria. more
Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and... more
Risky business: New data show how manatees use shipping channels  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A new publication in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science tracks West Indian manatee movements through nearshore and offshore ship channels in the north-central Gulf of Mexico. The... more
AlgaeDNAWhalesCRISPR
How personalities of wild small mammals affect forest structure
PHYS.ORG
Meet the naked mole-rat: impervious to pain and cancer, and lives ten times longer than it should
PHYS.ORG
Looming insect invasion threatens California wine and avocados
SCIENCE DAILY
This rock-eating ‘worm’ could change the course of rivers
Science Magazine
Renewable transportation fuels from water and carbon dioxide
PHYS.ORG
Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells
SCIENCE DAILY
Hubble observes tiny galaxy with big heart
PHYS.ORG
New photography technique brings hidden history of fossils to light
PHYS.ORG
Why Noah's Ark won't work
SCIENCE DAILY
iPhone plus nanoscale porous silicon equals cheap, simple home diagnostics
PHYS.ORG
Breakthrough in the discovery of DNA in ancient bones buried in water
SCIENCE DAILY
Researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
PHYS.ORG
Dynamics of key viral attack strategy visible for first time
PHYS.ORG
A bean for all seasons?
PHYS.ORG
Antibiotic resistance is not new – it existed long before people used drugs to kill bacteria
PHYS.ORG
Hominids may have been cutting-edge tool makers 2.6 million years ago
SCIENCE-NEWS
DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors
SCIENCE DAILY
New tool reveals how the different shapes of organisms grow
PHYS.ORG
Spitzer captures stellar family portrait
PHYS.ORG
How bacteria nearly killed by antibiotics can recover — and gain resistance
SCIENCE-NEWS
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