Anthropology
Integrated approach needs to be used to address opioid use among psychiatric patients  NEWS MEDICAL · 9 hours
Opioid use among psychiatric hospital patients needs to be addressed through an integrated approach to managing mental illness, pain and substance use,... more
Study Provides New Insight into Human Altruistic Behavior  SCI-NEWS.COM · 13 hours
Altruism blossoms in neighborhoods populated with highly educated people working in high-status jobs, according to new research. Altruism is a... more
Holiday Parties Make You Squirm? Here's How To Conquer Social Anxiety  NPR · 22 hours
People with social anxiety disorder fear their "fatal flaws" will be exposed by a wayward comment or other social misstep. If holiday parties send you spiraling,... more
Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
An Antarctic field campaign last winter led by the US and Australia has successfully extracted some of the largest samples of air dating from... more
New Eocene-Period Whale Unearthed in Egypt  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
Paleontologists have announced the discovery of a new genus and species of extinct protocetid whale, based on the fossilized remains found in the Western... more
People willing to risk near-certain death for an HIV cure  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
People willing to risk near-certain death for an HIV cure; protecting individuals and families in genetic and psychiatric research, considerations for including pregnant women in research. more
Children in the ancient Middle East were valued and vulnerable—not unlike children today  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The choices that societies make concerning the treatment of children can bring about the greatest of debates and prompt significant political action.... more
Canadian tundra formerly covered in rich forest: Ancient plant fossil record shows  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Canada's northernmost islands, Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg islands in Nunavut, were home to a vibrant, temperate forest 56 million years ago, according to fossil... more
Researchers find many psychiatric disorders share the same gene variants  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
An international team of researchers has found that many psychiatric disorders share a common and specific set of gene variants. more
Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Ancient air samples from one of Antarctica's snowiest ice core sites may add a new molecule to the record of changes to Earth's atmosphere... more
Ancient DNA confirms humans wiped out northern hemisphere's version of the penguin  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The North Atlantic was once home to a bird that bore a remarkable similarity to penguins. The great auk, also known as "the original... more
Canadian tundra formerly covered in rich forest, ancient plant fossil record shows  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The heady aroma of magnolia blossoms and lotus flowers might have wafted to your nostrils if you had gone for a walk 56 million... more
Computerized CBT for depression could improve access to treatment, reduce waiting lists  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Using a computerised version of cognitive-behavioural therapy to treat depression in children and young adults has the potential to improve access to psychological therapies and reduce waiting lists,... more
Want to avoid the holiday blues? New report suggests skipping the sweet treats  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
A new study from a team of clinical psychologists suggests eating added sugars -- common in so many holiday foods -- can... more
How humans learnt to dance; from the Chimpanzee Conga  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Psychologist observing two chimpanzees in a zoo have discovered that they performed a behaviour hitherto never seen, they coordinated together in a rhythmic social ritual. more
New insights into the most perplexing medical mysteries associated with schizophrenia  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Four unsolved mysteries around schizophrenia have long plagued the medical community, but a new hypothesis identifying a common link between them and an almost forgotten epidemic... more
How playing in a brass band could give your health a boost  MNT · 3 days
A new study, using survey responses, suggests that playing in a brass band may help improve respiratory health and psychological well-being. more
University Of Iowa wins $18 million grant to continue study on Huntington's disease  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Peg Nopoulos, MD, chair of psychiatry and professor of psychiatry, neurology, and pediatrics in the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine,... more
Tiny, Ancient Native American Weapons May Have Been Used to Train Children to Fight  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
Predating the bow and arrow, the atlatl was a dart-throwing weapon that could launch projectiles with great force. more
44,000-Year-Old Indonesian Cave Painting Is Rewriting The History Of Art  NPR · 4 days
In a cave in Indonesia, archaeologists have uncovered a stunning ancient painting of a hunting party that is thousands of years older than similar works found in Europe. more
[Research Articles] Distinct neural mechanisms for the prosocial and rewarding properties of MDMA  Science Magazine · 4 days
The extensively abused recreational drug (±)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has shown promise as an adjunct to psychotherapy for treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. It is unknown,... more
Medical News Today: How playing in a brass band could give your health a boost  MNT · 4 days
A new study, using survey responses, suggests that playing in a brass band may help improve respiratory health... more
Isotope analysis points to Mayan prisoners of war  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Several years ago, Maya archaeologists from the University of Bonn found the bones of about 20 people at the bottom of a water reservoir in the former Maya city of Uxul, in... more
Researchers analyze artifacts to better understand ancient dietary practices  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
New research from anthropologists at McMaster University and California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB), is shedding light on ancient dietary practices, the evolution of agricultural societies and ultimately, how plants... more
Isotope analysis points to prisoners of war, 1,400 years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Maya archaeologists found the bones of about 20 people at a water reservoir in the former Maya city of Uxul (Mexico). They had apparently been killed and dismembered... more
Ancient lice-like insects found to feed on dinosaur feathers  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China, the U.S. and Russia has found evidence of ancient lice-like insects that fed on dinosaur feathers. In their paper published... more
Two rovers to roll on Mars again: Curiosity and Mars 2020  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Curiosity won't be NASA's only active Mars rover for much longer. Next summer, Mars 2020 will be headed for the Red Planet. While the newest rover... more
The First Evidence of 'Head Cones' Found in 3,300-Year-Old Egyptian Tomb  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
Archaeologists have uncovered two ancient Egyptian burials holding bodies wearing head cones, the first physical evidence of the practice. more
Gold and Jewels Found on Minoan Island Devoted to the Color Purple  LIVE SCIENCE · 4 days
A storehouse of ancient treasures, including precious jewels and gold beads, has been uncovered by archaeologists on an island near Crete devoted to making... more
Buried Christian (and Pagan) Basilica Discovered in Ethiopia's 'Lost Kingdom' of Aksum  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
An ancient church from the fourth century, containing both early Christian and what may be pagan artifacts, has been unearthed in a buried town... more
Buried Christian (and Pagan) Church Discovered in Ethiopia's 'Lost Kingdom' of Aksum  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
An ancient church from the fourth century, containing both early Christian and what may be pagan artifacts, has been unearthed in a buried town... more
Older people today may not be any lonelier than their counterparts from prior generations  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
Despite some claims that Americans are in the midst of a "loneliness epidemic," older people today may not be any... more
Traveling back in time through smart archaeology  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The British explorer George Dennis once wrote, "Vulci is a city whose very name … was scarcely remembered, but which now, for the enormous treasures of antiquity it has yielded, is exalted above every... more
Breakthrough in 'distributed deep learning'  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Computer scientists, using a divide-and-conquer approach that leverages the power of compressed sensing, have shown they can train the equivalent of a 100 billion-parameter distributed deep learning network on a single machine in less than 35 hours for... more
Study explores Instagram users' experiences of miscarriage  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
About 10-20 % of all known pregnancies unfortunately end in miscarriage or the loss of a fetus. Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find... more
Asian water towers are world's most important and most threatened  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Scientists from around the world have assessed the planet's 78 mountain glacier-based water systems. For the first time, they ranked them in order of their importance to adjacent... more
480-million-year-old fossils reveal sea lilies' ancient roots  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Sea lilies, despite their name, aren't plants. They're animals related to starfish and sea urchins, with long feathery arms resting atop a stalk that keeps them anchored to the ocean floor. Sea lilies have... more
CRISPR-resistant viruses build 'safe rooms' to shield genomes from DNA-dicing enzymes  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Bacteria and the viruses that infect them are engaged in a molecular arms race as ancient as life itself. Evolution has equipped bacteria with an arsenal... more
Inpatient psychiatric hospitalization is associated with reduced suicidality, shows study  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
When an adolescent is acutely suicidal and cannot safely remain in the community, inpatient psychiatric hospitalization is the traditional intervention. more
Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
For years, Kim Cobb was the Indiana Jones of climate science. The Georgia Tech professor flew to the caves of Borneo to study ancient and current climate conditions. She jetted... more
Study highlights lack of psychological support for people dealing with infertility in the UK  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Psychological support for those dealing with infertility and its treatment is received by only just half of those who want... more
Discovery of genes involved in the biosynthesis of antidepressant  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum) is an ancient medicinal plant. It is known for the mild antidepressant properties of its bioactive compound hypericin, which is produced in the dark glands... more
Why some scientists want to rewrite the history of how we learned to walk  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
It's not often that a fossil truly rewrites human evolution, but the recent discovery of an ancient extinct ape has... more
Cuneiform reveals shared birthplace  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Assyriologists in Leiden have been conducting research into ancient clay tablets from the Middle East for 100 years already. What exactly do these clay tablets tell us? And why is Leiden such a good place to study them? more
Lower socioeconomic status of fathers is a risk factor for early preterm birth  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Lifelong lower socioeconomic status of fathers, as defined by early life and adulthood neighborhood income, is a newly identified risk factor for... more
A 6,000-year-old fruit fly gave the world modern cheeses and yogurts  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Historians often trace the dawn of human civilization back 10,000 years, when Neolithic tribes first settled and began farming in the Fertile Crescent, which stretches through... more
New Fossil Fills Gap in Evolution of Comma Shrimps  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 week
A new species of comma shrimp that lived during the mid-Cretaceous period, between 95 and 90 million years... more
Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 week
The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a new study. more
Paying taxes less 'taxing' when we recognize how those dollars help others, study finds  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
There's nothing certain in life except death and taxes. But taxpayers' support for the latter could potentially be improved, according... more
Link found between killings of unarmed black people by police and local babies born prematurely  PHYS.ORG · 1 week
Joscha Legewie, a sociologist at Harvard University has found a link between the killing of unarmed black people... more
Drug used to treat Parkinson’s shows potential as a dementia treatment  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Drug used to treat hallucinations and delusions in Parkinson's shows promise as treatment for dementia-related psychosis (DRP). more
As his wife’s caregiver, a doctor discovers what’s missing at health care’s core  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
Caring for someone with a serious illness stretches people spiritually and emotionally, often beyond what they might have thought possible. more
Researchers report substantial county-level variations in surgery rates for early-stage lung cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 week
A new study finds more than two-fold differences between counties with the lowest and highest rates of surgery for patients with early stage lung... more
Solving Fossil Mystery Could Aid Mars Life Quest  ASTRO WATCH · 1 week
The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth. Research... more
Findings could lead to new approach to treating alcohol use disorder  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A single infusion of ketamine, combined with outpatient behavioral therapy, helped alcohol-dependent individuals abstain from drinking for a few weeks after the treatment, researchers at Columbia... more
First experimental genetic evidence of the human self-domestication hypothesis  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
A new University of Barcelona study reveals the first empirical genetic evidence of human self-domestication, a hypothesis that humans have evolved to be friendlier and more cooperative by selecting their... more
Long-distance timber trade underpinned the Roman Empire's construction  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The ancient Romans relied on long-distance timber trading to construct their empire, according to a study published December 4, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Mauro Bernabei from the National... more
The wellbeing connection  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Soya and beef from South America, timber from Russia, fish from China—in an era of globalisation, central Europe has become a market for animal and plant products from all over the world. But in addition to these tangible goods, faraway... more
The Psychology Behind When Emotions Turn Us Into Different People  NPR · 2 weeks
In a fit of anger or in the grip of fear, many of us make decisions that we never would have anticipated. Researchers say it is very hard... more
Distress tolerance amplifies links between PTSD symptoms, alcohol use severity among firefighters  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
New findings by a University of Houston psychology professor indicate that among firefighters, distress tolerance amplifies associations between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and... more
Medical News Today: Study outlines concerns around natural psychoactive substances  MNT · 2 weeks
New evidence shows that the rate of exposure to natural psychoactive drugs in the United States has increased, putting adult and child health at risk. more
Two chiral catalysts working hand in hand  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Just as our left hand is not superposable to our right hand, the mirror image of certain molecules cannot be overlapped onto it, even when turned or twisted. These two mirror images are referred... more
Society benefits from investing in particle physics  CERN · 2 weeks
Society benefits from investing in particle physics achintya Tue, 12/03/2019 - 15:31 Large-scale scientific facilities, such as those for conducting particle-physics research, are financed by society. A team of economists recently performed a cost–benefit... more
The dangers of deregulation  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
From unsafe Boeing 737 Max jets to exploding chemical plants in Houston, we are seeing some visible and dramatic impacts of decades of deregulation. This trend did not start under President Donald Trump but has picked up momentum and increased... more
Reflecting on photos helps young cancer survivors regain confidence  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Young cancer survivors face unique medical and psychosocial challenges that can hinder their ability to move on mentally and socially, even years after their final treatment. Lingering feelings of isolation... more
Low-cost intervention can increase self-esteem of young cancer survivors  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
Young cancer survivors face unique medical and psychosocial challenges that can hinder their ability to move on mentally and socially, even years after their final treatment. more
Unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor revealed  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency- some estimate... more
Research uncovers mechanism that triggers inflammatory process by Mayaro virus  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
The mechanism by which defense cells respond to infection by Mayaro virus has been described by a team affiliated with the Center for Research on Inflammatory Diseases -... more
Risk of opioid overdose rises after de-addiction treatment completion  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 weeks
A study from Columbia University reveals that patients, who have been successfully treated with buprenorphine for opioid addiction, are at a greater risk of overdose after completion of the treatment.... more
Study: Lack of tolerance, institutional confidence threaten democracies  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
The stability of democracies worldwide could be vulnerable if certain cultural values continue to decline, according to a new study published in Nature Human Behaviour. more
Researchers reveal unexpected versatility of an ancient DNA repair factor  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
If a bone breaks or a tendon snaps, you know to seek treatment immediately. But your most fragile and precious cellular commodity, chromosomal DNA, breaks with astounding frequency—some... more
How ancient microbes created massive ore deposits, set stage for early life  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 weeks
Ancestors of modern bacteria cultured from an iron-rich lake in Democratic Republic of Congo could have been key to keeping Earth's dimly lit early... more
95-million-year-old fossil reveals new group of pterosaurs  PHYS.ORG · 2 weeks
Ancient flying reptiles known as pterosaurs were much more diverse than originally thought, according to a new study by an international group of paleontologists. more
Were Neanderthals, Denisovans and Other Archaic Humans Victims of Sixth Mass Extinction?  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. Neanderthals were stocky hunters adapted to Europe’s cold steppes, their... more
Will 2020 Be the Year We Find Intelligent Alien Life?  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 weeks
Is 2020 the celestial payoff year, in which astronomers finally confirm a "technosignature" coming from an advanced alien civilization? more
Cretaceous-Period Mammal Had Bizarre Middle Ear  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
Paleontologists in China have unearthed a nearly complete skeleton of a previously unknown Cretaceous mammal species with well-preserved middle ear bones. The ancient creature... more
Neanderthal Extinction Caused by Inbreeding and Smallness of Their Populations, Study Suggests  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 weeks
A long-standing enigma in paleoanthropology is the demise of Neanderthals about 40,000 years ago. There is general agreement that their disappearance coincides with migration... more
Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a new study. more
Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 weeks
Researchers present an expanded analysis of African ostrich eggshell beads, testing the hypothesis that larger beads signal the arrival of herders. The data reveals a more... more
Integrating climate adaptation and biodiversity conservation in the global ocean  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
The impacts of climate change and the socioecological challenges they present are ubiquitous and increasingly severe. Practical efforts to operationalize climate-responsive design and management in the global network... more
Boiled or roasted? Bivalve cooking methods of early Puerto Ricans elucidated using clumped isotopes  Science Magazine · 3 weeks
Cooking technique reflects a combination of cultural and technological factors; here, we attempt to constrain bivalve cooking temperatures for a... more
Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Ostrich eggshell beads are some of the oldest ornaments made by humankind, and they can be found dating back at least 50,000 years in Africa. Previous... more
Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams. more
Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a study published November 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS... more
In US, climate anxiety churns up psychological storm  PHYS.ORG · 3 weeks
In the melting Arctic, communities are racing to maintain their way of life. In the rising Pacific, residents are sounding alarm bells. And in Rhode Island, Kate Schapira and her husband are... more
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