Animals
19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems  SCIENCE DAILY · 48 minutes
About 120 clusters of 19th-century orchid bee nests were found during restoration work on the altarpiece of Basilica Cathedral in... more
New study identifies bumble bees' favorite flowers to aid bee conservation  PHYS.ORG · 1 hour
Many species of North American bumble bees have seen significant declines in recent decades. Bumble bees are essential pollinators for both native and agricultural plants, and... more
Rethinking land conservation to protect species that will need to move with climate change  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
All plants and animals need suitable conditions to survive. That means a certain amount of light, a tolerable temperature range,... more
Hungry for hutia? Our taste for Bahamas' 'most peaceable rodent' shaped its diversity  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
The Bahamian hutia, a large Caribbean rodent with a blissed-out disposition, presents a curious case study in how human food preferences can... more
Red Sea huge source of air pollution, greenhouse gases: study  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Hydrocarbon gases bubbling from the bottom of the Red Sea are polluting the atmosphere at a rate equivalent to the emissions of some large fossil fuel exporting countries,... more
Stalking Starlink's 'black sheep' DarkSat  PHYS.ORG · 4 hours
By now, you've no doubt heard of (or seen) Starlink. SpaceX's mega-satellite constellation has become a permanent fixture in our skies as of late, with several routine passes on any given week. But have you seen the supposed... more
Pulling out weeds is the best thing you can do to help nature recover from fire  PHYS.ORG · 4 hours
Many Australians feel compelled to help our damaged wildlife after this season's terrible bushfires. Suggested actions... more
Microplastic pollution: Scientists are still learning how it harms wildlife  PHYS.ORG · 4 hours
Plastic pollution is a growing global concern. Large pieces of plastic have been found almost everywhere on Earth, from the most visited beaches to remote, uninhabited islands. Because... more
Why we should be wary of blaming 'overpopulation' for the climate crisis  PHYS.ORG · 4 hours
The annual World Economic Forum in Davos brought together representatives from government and business to deliberate how to solve the worsening climate and ecological... more
From quarks to quails: Can the different sciences be unified?  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
The world around us is populated by a vast variety of things—ranging from genes and animals to atoms, particles and fields. While these can all be described by... more
Squid brains approach those of dogs  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
We are closer to understanding the incredible ability of squid to instantly camouflage themselves thanks to research from The University of Queensland. more
The long-term effects of wildfires  PHYS.ORG · 5 hours
The recent massive wildfires in Australia have killed more than 30 people and an estimated 1 billion animals, and burned 2,500 homes and millions of acres. And the human toll is expected to rise even after the blazes... more
Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
New research shows, contrary to previous scientific belief, a hormone required for sexual maturity in insects cannot travel across the blood-brain barrier unless aided by a... more
Study finds unexpected response to estrogen at the single cell level  NEWS MEDICAL · 8 hours
A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that not only do individual mammalian cells in a population fail to respond synchronously to... more
Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
New research from UC Riverside shows scientists may soon be able to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing. Using the same gene-altering techniques, they may also be... more
Beating the heat in the living wings of butterflies  PHYS.ORG · 9 hours
A new study from Columbia Engineering and Harvard identified the critical physiological importance of suitable temperatures for butterfly wings to function properly, and discovered that the insects exquisitely regulate their... more
Humans not always to blame for genetic diversity loss in wildlife  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Conservationists should be wary of assuming that genetic diversity loss in wildlife is always caused by humans, as new research published today by international conservation charity... more
What is toxoplasmosis?  LIVE SCIENCE · 21 hours
This parasitic infection hijacks rodent brains and infects people through dirty cat litter. There's a good chance you have it. more
Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Since the 1900s, neuroscientists have known that the peripheral nervous systems of tetrapods (four-footed animals) vary greatly, but how these differences affect the way... more
Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses  PHYS.ORG · 22 hours
Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves... more
Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides  SCIENCE DAILY · 23 hours
A study suggests that neuromuscular adaptations in mammals and birds may have allowed them to become more nimble than reptiles and amphibians. more
How widespread is illegal fishing? Albatrosses may provide the answer  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
Using albatrosses fitted with loggers, researchers at the CNRS and La Rochelle Université have made a first estimation of the number of non-declared fishing boats operating without an... more
Study calls for complete review of national support services for male survivors of sexual violence  NEWS MEDICAL · 24 hours
The sentencing of Reynhard Sinaga, the most prolific convicted rapist in British history, who preyed on largely straight... more
Unanticipated response to estrogen at the single cell level  SCIENCE DAILY · 24 hours
Researchers found that not only do individual mammalian cells in a population fail to respond synchronously to estrogen stimulation, neither do individual gene copies, known as alleles. more
Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses  SCIENCE DAILY · 24 hours
Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and... more
PET/MRI identifies notable breast cancer imaging biomarkers  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers have identified several potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers that indicate the presence and risk of malignancy, according to new research. more
'Profound' evolution: Wasps learn to recognize faces  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
One wasp species has evolved the ability to recognize individual faces among their peers—something that most other insects cannot do—signaling an evolution in how they have learned to work together. more
Researchers develop new model that simulates the accumulation of lipids in membranes  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Cholesterol is crucial to the formation of the cell membranes of mammals and is part of many life processes. more
19th-century bee cells in a Panamanian cathedral shed light on human impact on ecosystems  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Despite being "neotropical-forest-loving creatures," some orchid bees are known to tolerate habitats disturbed by human activity. However, little did the... more
Rewilding could prevent Arctic permafrost thaw and reduce climate change risks  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The wide-scale introduction of large herbivores to the Arctic tundra to restore the "mammoth steppe" grassland ecosystem and mitigate global warming is economically viable, suggests a... more
A new model has been developed that simulates the accumulation of lipids in membranes  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Cholesterol is crucial to the formation of the cell membranes of mammals and is part of many life processes. One... more
Fungal decisions can affect climate  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
When we think of climate change, we tend to think about greenhouse gases, fossil fuels and pollution. Most of us don't think about fungi. more
'Net' is closing in on more viable biological control options for fall armyworm menace  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The 'net' is closing in on more viable biological control agents to fight the scourge of the fall armyworm (FAW)... more
New Species of Carnivorous Dinosaur Unveiled: Allosaurus jimmadseni  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
A new species of carnivorous theropod dinosaur has been identified from the fossilized remains discovered in the 1990s in northeastern... more
Do robots and snails deserve human rights?  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In 1999, Sony launched Aibo, a line of robotic dogs designed to provide companionship to Japanese families. It could follow its owner around the house, wag its tail and respond to commands—all without the... more
Robotic heart to replace human transplants on the horizon  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Scientists are working to end the need for human heart transplants by 2028. A team of researchers in the UK, Cambridge, and the Netherlands are developing a robot heart that... more
Biodegradable bridge for nerve injuries  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Researchers have successfully tried a biodegradable bridge like device (biodegradable polycaprolactone PCL conduit) in vivo for management of nerve injuries. The team published their findings in a paper titled, “Long-gap peripheral nerve repair through sustained release of a... more
Dance of the honey bee reveals fondness for strawberries  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Bees are pollinators of many plants, but their diversity and density is declining. A team investigated their foraging behavior in agricultural landscapes. They found that honey bees prefer strawberry fields,... more
What do Chinese opera masks and spiders have in common? A lot, as it turns out.  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
To better understand how animals like spiders communicate with pattern and color, a University of Cincinnati... more
T. gondii parasite employs a sophisticated manipulation to suppress host's immune response  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Toxoplasma gondii is best known as the parasite that may lurk in a cat's litter box. Nearly a third of the world's population is... more
Dance of the honey bee reveals fondness for strawberries  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Bees are pollinators of many wild and crop plants, but in many places their diversity and density is declining. A research team from the Universities of Göttingen, Sussex and Würzburg... more
With a protein 'delivery,' parasite can suppress its host's immune response  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Toxoplasma gondii is best known as the parasite that may lurk in a cat's litter box. Nearly a third of the world's population is believed to... more
Something far deadlier than the Wuhan virus lurks near you  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
There's a deadly virus spreading from state to state. It preys on the most vulnerable, striking the sick and the old without mercy. In just the past few... more
Deciphering the sugar code  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Like animals and humans, plants possess a kind of immune system. It can e.g. recognize pathogenic fungi by the chitin in their cell walls, triggering disease resistance. Some fungi hide from the immune system by modifying some of the chitin... more
What we learn from a fish that can change sex in just 10 days  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
The bluehead wrasse is a fish that lives in small social groups in coral reefs in the Caribbean. Only the... more
715-Million-Year-Old Fungi Microfossils Found  SCI-NEWS.COM · 4 days
An international team of researchers has found the microscopic fungal filaments and mycelium-like structures in dolomitic shale from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The microfossils are at least... more
Experts call for overhaul of pesticide regulations  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A trio of researchers from Aarhus University, Agroscope, Wädenswil and Vetagro Sup, France, Marcy l'étoile has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science calling for an overhaul of the regulatory frameworks that... more
European fish stocks on the move  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Many European fish populations are on the move due to warming oceans and increasing numbers, according to new research from an international team of scientists led by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea... more
Jewel beetles' sparkle helps them hide in plain sight  SCIENCE DAILY · 4 days
Bright colors are often considered an evolutionary tradeoff in the animal kingdom. Yes, a male peacock's colorful feathers may help it attract a mate, but they also make it more... more
New species of Allosaurus discovered in Utah  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
A remarkable new species of meat-eating dinosaur has been unveiled at the Natural History Museum of Utah. Paleontologists unearthed the first specimen in early 1990s in Dinosaur National Monument in northeastern Utah. The huge... more
Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with... more
Infectious disease expert explains about Wuhan coronavirus  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
A new coronavirus virus, likely first transmitted to people from animals at a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan, is making international headlines as disease detectives work to uncover what it is, how... more
NIAID officials describe steps to control coronavirus that recently originated in China  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large... more
Sharp increase in Ningaloo whale shark injuries might be due to boat encounters  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Almost one-fifth of the whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) in Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef Marine Park show major scarring or fin amputations, with... more
Novel Coronavirus that recently emerged in China  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
The new cluster of viral pneumonia cases originating in Wuhan, China, marks the third time in 20 years that a member of the large family of coronaviruses (CoVs) has jumped from animals to humans... more
Chemicals in the environment: A focus on mixtures  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Chemicals have improved our quality of life. But at the same time, they pose a considerable risk for humans and the environment: pesticides, pharmaceuticals and plasticisers enter the environment and the food... more
New Research Tracks Evolution of Extinct Straight-Tusked Elephants  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
Palaeoloxodon is an extinct genus of straight-tusked elephants that lived throughout Europe and Asia during the Pleistocene and Holocene. It... more
Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, University of Michigan ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee... more
Jewel beetles' sparkle helps them hide in plain sight  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Bright colors are often considered an evolutionary tradeoff in the animal kingdom. Yes, a male peacock's colorful feathers may help it attract a mate, but they also make it more... more
Can a tiny invasive snail help save Latin American coffee?  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
While conducting fieldwork in Puerto Rico's central mountainous region in 2016, ecologists noticed tiny trails of bright orange snail excrement on the undersurface of coffee leaves afflicted with... more
Victorian efforts to export animals to new worlds failed, mostly  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
In 1890, a New York bird enthusiast released several dozen starlings in Central Park. No one knows for sure why Eugene Schieffelin set the birds aloft, but he... more
EU strides forward on just transition, but risks stumbling on fossil fuels  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The path to a climate neutral Europe became a little easier today, with the European Commission's proposal for a fund to help coal regions... more
Body heat through flexible fabric could power IoT devices for health monitoring for people, pets, machinery  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Wearable electronics and other Internet of Things (IoT) devices are rapidly growing in popularity, but their... more
Bird droppings provide clues to environmental change  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Queen's University researchers John Smol and Matthew Duda have identified concerning trends in a vulnerable seabird. more
Your plane travel destroys polar bear habitat  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A group of polar bear researchers wants you to do more than worry about the fate of these beautiful animals. They've calculated how much summer sea ice is melted per metric tonne of CO2... more
Study findings have implications for meningococcal B vaccine programs globally  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
The results of the B Part of It study – the largest meningococcal B herd immunity study ever conducted – are published today in the New England Journal... more
Catnip: What do we know about the feline drug?  MNT · 6 days
Catnip is the most famous stimulant for cats. How does it work, why does it not affect all cats, and are there any catnip alternatives? We investigate. more
Study provides key insights on potential origins of coronavirus outbreak in China  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Emerging viral infections--from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections--pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design... more
Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. An international team has developed a technology to systematically identify drug... more
Collaboration reveals promising therapeutic strategy for osteoarthritis  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Osteoarthritis affects 240 million people worldwide and is one of the most common causes of disability in both humans and animals. more
Even after death, animals are important in ecosystems  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Animal carcasses play an important role in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Scientists have published these findings in PLOS ONE. Carcasses not only provide food for carrion-eating animals. Their nutrients also increase the... more
Coronavirus outbreak in China traced to snakes  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Emerging viral infections -- from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections -- pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A... more
Researchers confirm safety of cancer-specific PET probe in first-in-human clinical studies  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
A group of researchers led by Assistant Professor WATABE Tadashi of the Graduate School of Medicine of Osaka University achieved the stable domestic production of automatic... more
Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world's food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the... more
Molecular identification of fungi microfossils in a Neoproterozoic shale rock  Science Magazine · 6 days
Precambrian fossils of fungi are sparse, and the knowledge of their early evolution and the role they played in the colonization of land surface are limited. Here, we... more
Medical News Today: Catnip: What do we know about the feline drug?  MNT · 6 days
Catnip is the most famous stimulant for cats. How does it work, why does it not affect all cats, and are there any catnip... more
Carcasses important for plants and insects in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Allowing the carcasses of dead deer to remain in the Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve has a positive effect on biodiversity in the area. Not only do the... more
Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which... more
PET/MRI identifies potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
Researchers have identified several potentially useful breast cancer biomarkers that indicate the presence and risk of malignancy, according to new research published in the January issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. more
Life aquatic for many spider species  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Researchers have found that nearly one fifth of all spider families are associated with saltwater or freshwater aquatic habitats. Their findings address the common misconception that all spiders dwell on land, and reveal surprising evolutionary pathways... more
Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers are exploring whether our phones could do the same. The authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate heat from running devices... more
Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China are exploring whether our phones could do the same. In a study published January 22 in the journal Joule,... more
Zero-deforestation pledges to protect wildlife in oil palm  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 days
New research has found that environmental efforts aimed at eliminating deforestation from oil palm production have the potential to benefit vulnerable tropical mammals. more
Researchers May Have Solved Mystery of Akrotiri’s Monkey Frescoes  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
The blue monkeys painted on the walls of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Santorini are among many... more
Neutron source enables a look inside dino eggs  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which... more
Get children into the real world for effective bushfire education  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Children and young people have been deeply impacted by the current bushfire crisis. Schools have been destroyed and thousands of houses have burnt down. Hazardous air pollution is... more
Inspiring STEM careers through a hands-on Everglades microbiome study  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The Florida Everglades evokes images of fanboats skimming over swamps, while alligators peer through the waters and clouds of insects hover just above. Described as a "river of grass" that... more
The yellow black-faced triplefin deflects sunlight to break predator camouflage  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Small fish use light for active sensing to detect potential predators. The yellow black-faced triplefin (Tripterygion delaisi) can reflect downwelling sunlight sideways with its iris, illuminating its immediate... more
Melting reveals drug targets in a living organism  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Developing new medicines and understanding how they target specific organs often gives a crucial advantage in the fight against human diseases. An international team led by researchers at the European Molecular Biology... more
Warm-blooded crocs thrived in Jurassic cold snap  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
They are revered throughout nature as chilling predators … now research shows crocodiles have not always been the cold-blooded creatures they are today. more
Ancient Assyrian rock carvings in Iraq show procession of gods riding mythical animals  LIVE SCIENCE · 6 days
Stunning ancient rock carvings that portray an Assyrian king paying homage to his gods amid a procession of mythical animals have been... more
Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity... more
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