Animals
Study demonstrates link between dog ownership and heart health  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 hours
Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if that pet is a dog, according to the first analysis of data from the Kardiozive Brno 2030 study. more
Exploiting mammalian low-complexity domains for liquid-liquid phase separation-driven underwater adhesive coatings  Science Magazine · 6 hours
Many biological materials form via liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), followed by maturation into a solid-like state. Here, using a biologically inspired assembly mechanism designed to recapitulate... more
Keeping monkeys as pets is extraordinarily cruel–a ban is long overdue  PHYS.ORG · 8 hours
Most people will have seen at least one headline over the last couple of years describing animal attacks on humans. This needn't include the elephant from... more
Your heart's best friend: Dog ownership associated with better cardiovascular health  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Owning a pet may help maintain a healthy heart, especially if that pet is a dog, according to a new analysis. The study examines the association... more
Larval Bees are Omnivores, Shows New Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 10 hours
Pollen-borne microbes represent an important protein source for larval bees, according to new research. Of the more than 20,000 species of bees... more
What's killing sea otters? Parasite strain from cats  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
Many wild southern sea otters in California are infected with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, yet the infection is fatal for only a fraction of sea otters, which has long puzzled the scientific... more
The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat  SCIENCE DAILY · 10 hours
In what likely is the first study on the evolution of dietary preferences across the animal kingdom, researchers report several unexpected discoveries, including that the first animal likely was a... more
Artificial trees capture new bird species on candid camera  PHYS.ORG · 10 hours
An experiment from The Australian National University (ANU) using artificial trees has attracted birds and other wildlife never before seen in a damaged Canberra landscape—catching them on camera at the... more
Birds balance sexiness and predator avoidance by changing color  PHYS.ORG · 11 hours
Most birds remain the same color year-round, replacing their feathers only once a year. more
Caffeine does not influence stingless bees  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
The western honey bee (Apis mellifera) that has a sting for use in defense is common in Western Europe. Stingless bees, on the other hand, are mainly at home in the tropics and subtropics. They are... more
Big brains or big guts: Choose one  SCIENCE DAILY · 12 hours
A global study comparing 2,062 birds finds that, in highly variable environments, birds tend to have either larger or smaller brains relative to their body size. Birds with smaller brains tend to use ecological... more
After using tools, crows behave more optimistically, study suggests  PHYS.ORG · 12 hours
It's no secret crows are smart. They're notorious for frustrating attempts to keep them from tearing into garbage cans; more telling, however, is that they are one of the few... more
Big brains or big guts: Choose one  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Big brains can help an animal mount quick, flexible behavioral responses to frequent or unexpected environmental changes. But some birds just don't need 'em. more
Here's how early humans evaded immunodeficiency viruses  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
The cryoEM structure of a simian immunodeficiency virus protein bound to primate proteins shows how a mutation in early humans allowed our ancestors to escape infection while monkeys and apes did not. SIV's Nef... more
Yet another way dogs help the military: aeromedical patient evacuations  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Animal-assisted therapy has many benefits in health care. Yet, its biological and psychosocial effects in the military are unknown, especially for injured, airlifted patients. Researchers teamed up with... more
Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have... more
What's killing sea otters? Scientists pinpoint parasite strain  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Many wild southern sea otters in California are infected with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, yet the infection is fatal for only a fraction of sea otters, which has long puzzled the scientific... more
San Francisco Zoo brings red-legged frogs back to Yosemite  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A healthy population of red-legged frogs is hopping in Yosemite National Park, helped by a reintroduction program with the San Francisco Zoo. more
The Malaria Cell Atlas: Single parasite transcriptomes across the complete Plasmodium life cycle  Science Magazine · 1 day
Malaria parasites adopt a remarkable variety of morphological life stages as they transition through multiple mammalian host and mosquito vector environments. We... more
Experiments illuminate key component of plants' immune systems  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Plants, like humans and animals, have over millions of years evolved complex immune systems that fend off invading pathogens. But unlike many animals, plants lack adaptive immunity conferred by antibodies. This means... more
US environmental groups sue over wildlife protection rollbacks  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
US environmental groups have sued the administration of President Donald Trump over rollbacks that weaken the Endangered Species Act, a law credited with saving iconic species from the bald eagle to the... more
Scratching the surface of how your brain senses an itch  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Light touch plays a critical role in everyday tasks, such as picking up a glass or playing a musical instrument, as well as for detecting the touch of,... more
Mexican marijuana traffickers are poisoning California forests with a banned pesticide, officials say  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
California law enforcement has learned that Mexican drug traffickers are using a dangerous pesticide banned in the United States to grow marijuana... more
Hundreds of Pyrenees livestock farmers protest predator bears  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Hundreds of Spanish livestock farmers staged a protest Thursday in the Pyrenees town of Ainsa against the re-introduction of brown bears to the mountain region saying the predators are a menace to... more
Geologists get called 'dirty polluters', but we're needed to fight climate change  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
When people hear we are geologists, we are often asked if we have found any oil lately. Sadly—and wrongly—the most common view of geology... more
There are way more species of horseshoe bats than scientists thought  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Horseshoe bats are bizarre-looking animals with giant ears and elaborate flaps of skin on their noses that they use like satellite dishes. There are about a... more
An Ice Age savannah corridor let large mammals spread across Southeast Asia  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
New research from the University of Tübingen indicates that the Thai-Malay Peninsula—where parts of Malaysia, Myanmar and Thailand are located—was at least partly an... more
Indigenous hunters are protecting animals, land and waterways  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Canada aims to conserve 17 percent of its land and fresh water by the end of 2020. This noble objective will help protect water, air, food and biodiversity and improve the health... more
Identified: Molecular structure that breaks down an important component of smog  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Nitrogen oxides, also known as NOx, form when fossil fuels burn at high temperatures. When emitted from industrial sources such as coal power plants, these pollutants... more
The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
In what is likely the first study to look at how dietary preferences evolved across the animal kingdom, UA researchers looked at more than a million species, going back 800... more
Researchers developing natural pesticide alternative to target pests without harming honeybees  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
A natural, sustainable alternative to pesticides that targets specific pests, without harming beneficial pollinators such as honeybees, is being developed with the help of researchers from... more
Greenhouse uses predatory insects for pest control  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
The William & Mary greenhouse has started a new program to limit the use of chemicals by relying on predatory insects for pest control. It's the biological equivalent of fighting fire with fire ⁠—... more
Meet Adratiklit boulahfa, World’s Earliest Known Stegosaur  SCI-NEWS.COM · 1 day
Paleontologists in Morocco have found fossil fragments from a new genus and species of stegosaur that walked the Earth about 168 million... more
Conflicting consequences of climate change for Arctic nesting geese  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Life over the last half-century has been pretty good for populations of Svalbard barnacle geese. A hunting ban implemented in the 1950s in their overwintering area in Scotland has led... more
French mayor due in court after banning pesticide use near homes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A mayor in northwest France is to appear in court on Thursday after banning the use of pesticides near homes in his village in a case... more
French Guiana grapples with Asian craving for fish bladder  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
For years, Asian demand for a dried fish bladder prized as a culinary delicacy—and purported aphrodisiac—has been a boon to French Guiana's fishing industry, but officials are racing to rein... more
Off the hook: California king salmon rebounds after drought  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Trolling off the California coast, Sarah Bates leans over the side of her boat and pulls out a long, silvery fish prized by anglers and seafood lovers: wild king salmon. more
There are way more species of horseshoe bats than scientists thought  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Horseshoe bats are bizarre-looking animals with giant ears and elaborate flaps of skin on their noses that they use like satellite dishes. There are about a... more
Fish oils have little or no effect on risk of Type 2 diabetes  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Omega-3 fats have little or no effect on risk of Type 2 diabetes according to new research from the University of East... more
20-million-year-old skull suggests complex brain evolution in monkeys, apes  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
New research on one of the oldest and most complete fossil primate skulls from South America shows instead that the pattern of brain evolution in this group was far more... more
Parasite needs chemical (lipid/nutrient) in cat intestines for sex  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Toxoplasma gondii is a microbial parasite that infects humans and but needs cats to complete its full life cycle. New research shows why: the sexual phase of the parasite's life... more
A Man Accidentally Swallowed a Fish Bone. It Tore a Hole Through His Intestine.  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 days
People swallow fish bones all the time. But it's rare for fish bones to pierce a hole through the intestine,... more
Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or... more
Cranial endocast of a stem platyrrhine primate and ancestral brain conditions in anthropoids  Science Magazine · 2 days
Understanding of ancestral conditions for anthropoids has been hampered by the paucity of well-preserved early fossils. Here, we provide an unprecedented view... more
Viruses mobilize plant immunity to deter nonvector insect herbivores  Science Magazine · 2 days
A parasite-infected host may promote performance of associated insect vectors; but possible parasite effects on nonvector insects have been largely unexplored. Here, we show that Begomovirus, the largest genus of... more
Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Fiddler crabs see the polarisation of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or... more
20-million-year-old skull suggests complex brain evolution in monkeys, apes  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
It has long been thought that the brain size of anthropoid primates—a diverse group of modern and extinct monkeys, humans, and their nearest kin—progressively increased over time. New research on... more
Naked And Unafraid: 6 Wild Facts About Naked Mole Rats  NPR · 2 days
Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to... more
Analyzing genomes to improve disease control in poultry  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Marek's disease—a highly contagious viral disease caused by a herpesvirus—is a constant threat to poultry worldwide. It is also one of the most preventable diseases with vaccination. However, while vaccines prevent poultry... more
Hush, baby -- the dog is whimpering!  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
We are all familiar with the sounds of a cat or dog vying for human attention, and for pet-owners, these sounds are particularly evocative. Dog sounds are especially sad to both cat and dog... more
New brain map could improve AI algorithms for machine vision  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Neuroscientists have published an updated view on the primate brain's visual system organization. They found that parts of the primate visual system may work differently than previously thought. more
Fruit flies learn their body size once for an entire lifetime  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
In order to orient themselves and survive in their environment, animals must develop a concept of their own body size. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz... more
The secret sex lives of stick insects  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Massey University researchers have discovered more about the sexual lives of stick insects in New Zealand and the United Kingdom. more
'Otterly adorable'?: Demand for cute selfies puts animals at risk  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Social media users are fuelling a burgeoning appetite for acquiring wild otters and other endangered animals as pets, conservationists say, warning the trend could push species towards extinction. more
Mimicking the diving bell spider to improve carbon conversion into fuels  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has found a way to improve the conversion of CO2 into fuels by mimicking the behavior... more
How conserving nature's 'umbrella' species could benefit whole habitats  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
In conservation, charismatic mammals and birds such as the black rhinoceros and the capercaillie get a lot of attention, while others, like invertebrates, are often ignored. One way of addressing... more
Link between brain immune cells and Alzheimer's disease development identified  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Scientists have discovered how to forestall Alzheimer's disease in a laboratory setting, a finding that could one day help in devising targeted drugs that prevent it. The researchers... more
Century-old fish scales reveals startling decline in salmon populations  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Researchers drawing on 100-year-old sources of salmon data have found that recent returns of wild adult sockeye salmon to the Skeena River—Canada's second largest salmon watershed— are 75 percent lower... more
Pressure mounting on EU to end ivory trade  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Amid growing calls for an outright ban, the European Union is coming under increasing pressure to help protect African elephants by ending the trade of ivory within its borders. more
Researchers show evidence of cellular clocks in cells  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
One of nature's most familiar phenomena is collective behavior—fish swimming in schools, locusts marching together, birds flocking. The same thing happens in humans, with individual cells synchronizing into circadian rhythms, part of... more
Drug that treat human breast cancer might also work for canine lung cancer  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
Despite those velvet paintings of poker-playing dogs smoking pipes, cigars and cigarettes, our canine friends really don't use tobacco. But like many... more
More than 2,300 tigers killed and trafficked this century: report  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
More than 2,300 endangered tigers have been killed and illegally trafficked since the turn of the century, according to a report published Tuesday, urging more action to protect... more
UGA study provides first evidence of biological clocks in individual cells  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
One of nature's most familiar phenomena is collective behavior- fish swimming in schools, locusts marching together, birds flocking. more
Medical News Today: What can cause red spots on the feet?  MNT · 3 days
There are many possible causes of red spots on the feet, including injuries, insect bites, irritations, and infections. Learn about some common causes and how to... more
Medical News Today: What chronic illnesses are people with HIV more likely to experience?  MNT · 3 days
An 'umbrella review of meta-analyses of observational studies' zooms in on the conditions that people living with HIV are at... more
A lack of self control during adolescence is not uniquely human  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Impulsiveness in adolescence isn't just a phase, it's biology. And despite all the social factors that define our teen years, the human brain and the brains... more
Lung cell transplant boosts healing after the flu in mice  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
A serious case of the flu can cause lasting damage to the lungs. In a study in mice, researchers found that transplanting cells from the lungs of healthy... more
Treating dogs with human breast cancer drug  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Like many women who develop a particular type of breast cancer, the same gene -- HER2 -- also appears to be the cause of lung cancer in many dogs. Researchers found that neratinib --... more
Migratory Songbirds Trade Off Safety for Lower Energy Expenditure, New Study Shows  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
Each spring and fall, millions of birds switch to migrating at night. Most of these are small songbirds migrating long distances that need to... more
African elephants demonstrate movements that vary in response to ecological change  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Wild African elephants show markedly different movements and reactions to the same risks and resources, according to a new study. more
The meat allergy: Researcher IDs biological changes triggered by tick bites  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers have identified key immunological changes in people who abruptly develop an allergic reaction to mammalian meat, such as beef. The work is an important step... more
The journey of the pollen  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
When insects carry the pollen from one flower to another to pollinate them, the pollen must attach to and detach from different surfaces. Scientists have discovered that the mechanisms are far more complex than previously assumed. They differ... more
Studying animal cognition in the wild  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Studying cognition in the wild is a challenge. Field researchers and their study animals face many factors that can easily interfere with their variables of interest and that many say are 'impossible' to control for. A... more
Connected forest networks on oil palm plantations key to protecting endangered species  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Set-aside patches of high-quality forest on palm oil plantations may help protect species like orangutans, as well as various species of insects, birds and... more
The journey of pollen and the process of pollen dispersal  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
For allergy sufferers, the pollination period is a tough time, whereas for plants it is the opportunity to reproduce: in addition to the wind, insects, in particular, carry... more
African elephants demonstrate movements that vary in response to ecological change  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Wild African elephants, known for their intelligence, show markedly different movements and reactions to the same risks and resources. A new study led by Colorado State... more
Meet the 'rock star' frog breeder vying to save Southern California's rarest amphibian  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
It was happy hour at the "Frog Shack," a tiny building at the Los Angeles Zoo offering all the amenities that Southern... more
Decades-old puzzle of the ecology of soil animals solved  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has deciphered the defence mechanism of filamentous fungi. Moulds are a preferred food source for small animals. As fungi cannot... more
Dog down: Effort helps emergency medical staff treat law enforcement K-9s  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Law enforcement K-9s face the same dangers their human handlers confront. Recognizing a gap in care for law enforcement K-9s injured on the job, a team... more
A brush with a notorious cat, my rabies education and the big bill that followed  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 days
I was just petting an orange tabby cat in my Falls Church, Va., neighborhood, a cat I’d never... more
Caught on video: Watch the 'trash fish' of the American South vacuum up its prey  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The alligator gar, a toothy, narrow-snouted fish that resembles its namesake reptile, is the largest, native, freshwater predator... more
Hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
Researchers who rush in after storms to study the behavior of spiders have found that extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones may have an evolutionary impact on populations living in storm-prone... more
Hand gestures point towards the origins of language  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Communication gestures used by humans and our primate relatives are providing clues about how our species' ability to use spoken language evolved. more
Scientists discover new way to reconstruct what extinct animals looked like  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Scientists could be set to reveal the most accurate depictions of ancient vertebrates ever made after a world-first discovery at University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland. more
Making biominerals: Nature's recipe is old, evolved more than once  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
In recent years, scientists have teased out many of the secrets of biomineralization, the process by which sea urchins grow spines, mollusks build their shells and corals make... more
NewMed donates gift hampers for rescue dogs this Christmas  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
This Christmas, NewMed, based in Kent, created and donated gift hampers for local rescue dogs in a bid to raise awareness of the number of dogs who are abandoned during... more
Urgency for vaccine grows as virus ravages China's pigs  PHYS.ORG · 4 days
Scientists are working to develop a vaccine to help guard the world's pork supply as a deadly virus ravages Asia's pig herds. more
Analysis of long-term data of an outbreak of classical swine fever in wild boars  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Swine fever, rabies, bird flu - outbreaks of diseases in wildlife populations often also affect farm animals and humans. more
Researchers investigate curious phenomenon of 'male-killing' microbes in insects  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 days
Researchers at the University of Liverpool are leading a new international project to investigate the curious phenomenon of 'male-killing' microbes in insects. more
Brain study probes molecular origins of anxiety  MNT · 4 days
By studying young monkeys, scientists have identified the first of what they believe to be many brain molecules with a causal role in anxiety. more
Medical News Today: Brain study probes molecular origins of anxiety  MNT · 4 days
By studying young monkeys, scientists have identified the first of what they believe to be many brain molecules with a causal role in anxiety. more
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