Animals
Successful testing of multi-organ "human-on-a-chip" could replace animals as test subjects  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
The replacement of animals as test subjects is one step closer to reality with the successful testing of multi-organ "human-on-a-chip" models to recapitulate the 28-day experiments... more
Frog-skin bacteria more diverse in cold and variable temperature regions, finds study  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research... more
New identified biomarker predicts patients who might benefit from HER2-targeted agents  NEWS MEDICAL · 4 hours
In an effort to further individualize therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report a new study using PET scans... more
Researchers uncover interspecies communication between gut bacteria and host  NEWS MEDICAL · 3 hours
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do. more
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 hours
Researchers swabbed more than 2300 animals representing 205 amphibian species to better understand the ecology of their skin bacteria. They asked which environmental factors... more
PET scans show biomarkers could spare some breast cancer patients from chemotherapy  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
In an effort to further individualize therapy and avoid over-treating patients, researchers report a new study using PET scans has identified a biomarker that... more
Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life  SCIENCE DAILY · 6 hours
Paleobiologists have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington,... more
New method helps quantify very low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 hours
Researchers from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland have developed an ultra-sensitive method to quantify extremely low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey. more
Focusing on the fovea  SCIENCE DAILY · 9 hours
Using high-throughput genetic sequencing methods, scientists have created the first cellular atlas of the primate retina, an important foundation for researchers to build on as they seek to understand how vision works in primates, including humans, and how vision can... more
DeepSqueak: Deep Learning-Based System Decodes Rodent Chatter  SCI-NEWS.COM · 13 hours
Deep learning has recently revolutionized the field of machine hearing and vision, by allowing computers to perform human-like activities including seeing, listening,... more
Recent drought may provide a glimpse of the future for birds in the Sierra Nevada  SCIENCE DAILY · 13 hours
To better understand the effects of climate change on the bird community in the Sierra Nevada region, researchers... more
How bird feather patterns form  SCIENCE DAILY · 14 hours
According to a new study, the precise patterning of bird feathers relies on signaling through ectodysplasin (EDA) and its receptor EDAR -- the same signaling pathway known to be crucial for the formation of hair follicles, teeth and... more
Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals. Scientists have discovered that both foxes... more
'Flying bulldog': world's largest bee refound  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
The world's largest bee—a giant insect roughly the size of a human thumb—has been rediscovered in a remote part of Indonesia in its first sighting in nearly 40 years, researchers said Thursday. more
Cretaceous Marsupial Lived Above Arctic Circle  SCI-NEWS.COM · 17 hours
Paleontologists have uncovered a new species of marsupial that lived during the Cretaceous period above the Arctic Circle, the farthest north marsupials have ever... more
World's Largest Bee Is Spotted For First Time In Decades  NPR · 14 hours
The bee towers over its apian cousins. Females have been recorded as being at least an inch and a half long. Add to that a pair of gigantic... more
Dermal disruption: Amphibian skin bacteria is more diverse in cold, variable environments  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Amphibians are victims of lethal skin-disease epidemics. In the first global-scale study, researchers from 31 universities and research centers, including the Smithsonian Tropical Research... more
How bird feather patterns form  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird's skin, but it has been unclear how this happens. According to a new study published... more
Method assesses health and size of lizard populations  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Monitoring programs that survey many wildlife species at the same time across large geographic regions are important for informing conservation decisions, but reptiles are often missing from these efforts because they are... more
The world’s largest bee has been rediscovered after 38 years  SCIENCE-NEWS · 14 hours
Researchers rediscovered the world’s largest bee living in the forests of an island of Indonesia. more
New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered  PHYS.ORG · 16 hours
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian... more
How to keep stink bugs out this winter  PHYS.ORG · 14 hours
Every winter stink bugs infiltrate homes across the United States and two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Virginia Tech researchers may shed some light on ways to... more
Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird -- the now extinct adzebill -- showing that some of its closest living relatives... more
New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered  SCIENCE DAILY · 15 hours
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts; they can also tell the genes in their mammalian... more
Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists  SCIENCE DAILY · 17 hours
An international team of scientists has shown that fossilized eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple animals. more
Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
Amiskwia was originally described by the famous palaeontologist Charles Doolittle Walcott (1850-1927) in 1911 who compared it to the modern arrow worms... more
Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand's most mysterious giant flightless bird – the now extinct adzebill – showing that some of its closest living relatives... more
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
A newly discovered, diminutive -- by T. rex standards -- relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came... more
Worrying long-term stability of pesticides in honey  PHYS.ORG · 19 hours
Researchers from the University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland have developed an ultra-sensitive method to quantify extremely low concentrations of neonicotinoid pesticides in honey. This is a follow up to their study on the global contamination... more
Rules of inheritance rewritten in worms  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
The idea that children inherit half of their DNA from each parent is a central tenet of modern genetics. But a team led by KAUST's Christian Frøkjær-Jensen has re-engineered this heredity pattern in roundworms, a commonly... more
Yeasts reach across tree of life to domesticate suite of bacterial genes  PHYS.ORG · 18 hours
An insect's gut might seem an inhospitable place to settle in, but diverse microbes nonetheless make their home there. Yet in the gut, there's... more
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex  PHYS.ORG · 20 hours
A newly discovered, diminutive—by T. rex standards—relative of the tyrant king of dinosaurs reveals crucial new information about when and how T. rex came to rule the North... more
New study—how to save a seabird  PHYS.ORG · 21 hours
In the 1990s, the endangered status of the short-tailed albatross catalyzed efforts to reduce the number of birds accidentally killed as bycatch in Alaska, home to the country's biggest fisheries. Marine fisheries scientist Ed Melvin, at... more
Ocean acidification shown to have negative impact on fish skeletons  PHYS.ORG · 21 hours
For more than a century, the world's oceans have been becoming steadily more acidic as they soak up ever-increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and the... more
This Fish Just Gave Evolution the Finger and Got Pregnant  LIVE SCIENCE · 21 hours
Mary's species of fish never evolved to have sex or incubate live young. She did it anyway. more
Female golden snub-nosed monkeys share nursing of young  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
An international team of researchers including The University of Western Australia and China's Central South University of Forestry and Technology has discovered that female golden snub-nosed monkeys in China are happy to... more
Squid could provide an eco-friendly alternative to plastics  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
The remarkable properties of a recently-discovered squid protein could revolutionize materials in a way that would be unattainable with conventional plastic, finds a review published in Frontiers in Chemistry. Originating in the... more
Protecting small forests will not maintain bird biodiversity over the long run, shows study  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led... more
Study gives a snapshot of crocodile evolution  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
The story that's often told about crocodiles is that they're among the most perfectly adapted creatures on the planet - living fossils that have remained virtually unchanged for millions of years. more
Sir Charles Lyell's historical fossils (London's Natural History Museum) accessible online  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
More than 1,700 animal and plant specimens from the collection of eminent British geologist Sir Charles Lyell—known as the pioneer of modern geology—were organised, digitised and... more
Researchers uncover mechanisms that prevent tooth replacement in mice  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice,... more
Researchers unlock the secret behind reproduction of fish called ‘Mary’  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary', has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the... more
Activating tooth regeneration in mice  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement.... more
Homo sapiens colonized South Asian rainforest by hunting small mammals 45,000 years ago  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
A new study provides direct evidence for the hunting of tree-dwelling monkeys and other small mammals by Homo sapiens 45,000 years ago... more
Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
New research revealed that foreign honey bees often account for more than 90 percent of pollinators observed visiting flowers in San Diego, considered a global biodiversity hotspot. The non-native bees have established... more
Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary,' has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilized while they were still inside her, according to scientists. more
Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new research provides... more
Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A new study has traced an important period of organ formation, cell by cell, in the developing mouse. The study is by far the largest dataset of its... more
Routine allomaternal nursing in a free-ranging Old World monkey  Science Magazine · 2 days
While regular allomaternal nursing (suckling) has been documented in a number of rodent and carnivore species, as well as in some prosimians, New World monkeys, and humans, it is not... more
Copepods drive large-scale trait-mediated effects in marine plankton  Science Magazine · 2 days
Fear of predation may influence food webs more than actual predation. However, the mechanisms and magnitude of nonconsumptive predator effects are largely unknown in unicellular-dominated food webs such as marine plankton. We... more
Medical News Today: Bacteria living on insects could provide new antibiotics  MNT · 2 days
Insects harbor bacteria that protect them from infection. Tapping this source could yield new antibiotics to combat the growing threat of drug resistance. more
Establishing the molecular blueprint of early embryo development  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A team of biologists, physicists and mathematical modellers in Cambridge have studied the genetic activity of over 100,000 embryonic cells to establish the molecular blueprint of mouse early embryo development. This new... more
Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a new study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain... more
Massive database traces mammal organ development, cell by single cell  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The very early days of growth, long before we are born, are a time of incredible development. In a relatively short period of time, we and other mammals... more
Extraordinary Diversity on Land Is Not a Recent Phenomenon, Says New Study  SCI-NEWS.COM · 2 days
According to new research published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, land animal diversity has been similar for at least the last 60... more
Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon around Arctic  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according... more
City bees' favourite flowers, according to our DNA tracking experiment  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
As cities get bigger and cover more land, the need to make space for wildlife – including insects – in urban areas has become more pressing. Research has... more
Activating tooth regeneration in mice  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Most reptiles and fish have multiple sets of teeth during their lifetime. However, most mammals, such as humans, have only one set of replacement teeth and some mammals, like mice, have only a single set with no replacement.... more
Earliest example of animal nest sharing revealed by scientists  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
An international team of scientists, including researchers from the University of Southampton, has shown that fossilised eggshells unearthed in western Romania represent the earliest known nest site shared by multiple... more
Should you feed wild birds in winter?  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Nothing brightens a yard like a flock of twittering birds, and nothing draws them like a free meal—but it's an open question whether bird feeders are good for them or not, says a University... more
Feral cat cull: Why the 2 million target is on scientifically shaky ground  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The Australian government's target of killing 2 million feral cats by 2020 attracted significant public interest and media attention when it was... more
Familiarity breeds aggression  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Aggressiveness among animals may increase the longer individuals live together in stable groups. The study used the Amazon molly, a naturally clonal fish species that produces genetically identical individuals to isolate the effects of familiarity on behavior. more
Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Hike around the natural habitats of San Diego County and it becomes abundantly clear that honey bees, foreign to the area, are everywhere. In a study published last year, researchers at the... more
Protecting small forests fails to protect bird biodiversity  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain... more
Crocodile face off: Study examines how developmental changes resulted in changes to crocodile snouts  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The story that's often told about crocodiles is that they're among the most perfectly adapted creatures on the planet—living fossils... more
Budget‑friendly ways to get your veggie fix as prices rise  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The Food Price Report 2019, released by Dalhousie University and the University of Guelph in December, suggested vegetable prices will go up by as much as six per... more
The monkey hunters: Humans colonized South Asian rainforest by hunting primates  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A multidisciplinary study has found evidence for humans hunting small mammals in the forests of Sri Lanka at least 45,000 years ago. The researchers discovered the... more
Air purification is catching on – but it may be doing more harm than good  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
I recently found myself in the surreal world of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas discussing the... more
New insights into phenotypic complexity and diversity among cichlids  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Is evolution predictable? What are the mechanisms that allow different fish to respond to the same environmental challenge in slightly different ways? When the same jaw bones and muscles change... more
Studying ant cooperation is revealing how brains work together  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
As a child, you almost certainly at one stage spent hours watching ants move about from their nest. Maybe you dropped a piece of food and watched as a group... more
Scientists Release Controversial Genetically Modified Mosquitoes In High-Security Lab  NPR · 2 days
The insects were created, using CRISPR, to carry a powerful "gene drive." The mosquitoes could provide a potent weapon against malaria, but they raise fears about unpredictable environmental effects. more
Scientists solve mystery of a fish called Mary's 'virgin' birth  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A female stickleback fish, nick-named 'Mary', has produced offspring from eggs that appear to have been fertilised while they were still inside her, according to scientists at the... more
Rubicon level linked to inhibition of autophagic process  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Autophagy is an important biological recycling mechanism that is used to maintain homeostasis within all types of animal tissue. Many studies have attempted to understand the relationship between the reduction of autophagy... more
20-million-year-old tusked sea cow is Central America's oldest marine mammal  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
A researcher searching the shoreline of the Panama Canal for fossil plants instead found an ancient sea cow. An 'emergency fossil excavation' due to rising water levels yielded... more
Darwin's finches don't tell the whole story of avian evolution  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The connection between bird diet and skull shape is surprisingly weak for most species according to a new study led by UCL and the Natural History Museum, rewriting... more
Antibiotic resistances spread faster than thought, aquaculture study reveals  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
By studying fish raised in aquaculture, researchers have shed new light on the mechanisms by which antibiotic resistance genes are transferred between bacteria. According to their study, those mechanisms are... more
Want to learn about dinosaurs? Pick up some Louisiana roadkill  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Fossil-hunting can be grueling, but it's usually not gross. Paleontologists typically work with things that have been dead for millions of years, mineralized into rock and no longer... more
The key to increased lifespan? Rubicon alters autophagy in animals during aging  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Autophagy is an important biological recycling mechanism that influences the progression of aging in animals. Here, age-related changes in autophagy were studied in multiple... more
Ocean acidification harms cod larvae more than previously thought  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
The Atlantic cod is one of the most important commercial fish species in the world. Recent studies have shown that ocean acidification threatens the early life stages of this species.... more
Neanderthals' main food source was definitely meat  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Researchers describe two late Neanderthals with exceptionally high nitrogen isotope ratios, which would traditionally be interpreted as the signature of freshwater fish consumption. By studying the isotope ratios of single amino acids, they however... more
Carbon taxes could create new winners and losers among countries  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Although conventional wisdom suggests that poor countries are more likely to bear a disproportionate burden of a worldwide carbon tax on fossil fuels used for electricity and transportation,... more
Medical News Today: Self-destruction system in TB bacteria may lead to 'perfect drug'  MNT · 3 days
Scientists zoom in on the 'toxin-antitoxin' system that the tuberculosis bacterium naturally contains, in the hope that it can help design better... more
Why North Carolinian boats are fishing off New Jersey's coast  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
As the oceans warm in response to climate change, fishing boats in the Mid-Atlantic that focus on only one or two species of fish are traveling more than... more
20-million-year-old tusked sea cow is Central America's oldest marine mammal  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Steven Manchester didn't set out to discover Central America's oldest known marine mammal. He was hoping to find fossil plants. more
Multicellular Life Began 1.5 Billion Years Earlier than Thought  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
Approximately 2.1-billion-year-old fossilized tracks discovered in Gabon suggest the existence of a cluster of single cells that came... more
A tasty Florida butterfly turns sour  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
The viceroy butterfly is a mimic, modeling its orange-and-black colors after the queen butterfly, a bug that tastes so disgusting predators have learned not to eat it or anything that looks like it, including viceroys. The... more
Why North Carolinian boats are fishing off New Jersey's coast, and how a CSF might help  SCIENCE DAILY · 3 days
By studying the logbooks of fishing boats, researchers found that some fishing boats travel more than... more
Cassowary’s Distinctive Helmet Acts as Thermal Radiator  SCI-NEWS.COM · 3 days
The cassowary (Casuarius casuarius) is a large, flightless bird that bears a prominent helmet (or casque). The function of the cranial structure... more
Fish with a high level of familiarity are more aggressive towards each other  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Aggressiveness among animals may increase the longer individuals live together in stable groups. This is the finding of a recent study carried... more
Aussie rodent becomes first 'climate change extinction'  PHYS.ORG · 3 days
Australia officially declared a Great Barrier Reef rodent extinct on Tuesday, making it the first mammal believed to have been killed off by human-induced climate change. more
CatsDogsPrimates
New species of tiny tyrannosaur foreshadows rise of T. rex
PHYS.ORG
The world’s largest bee has been rediscovered after 38 years
SCIENCE-NEWS
Feral cat cull: Why the 2 million target is on scientifically shaky ground
PHYS.ORG
Ancient 'night' marsupial faced four months of winter darkness
PHYS.ORG
How to fight climate change in agriculture while protecting jobs
PHYS.ORG
In an Australian first, the ACT may legally recognise animals' feelings
PHYS.ORG
This Horrifying Menagerie of AI-Generated Cat Photos Will Haunt You
LIVE SCIENCE
From fear of spiders to fascination
PHYS.ORG
Tracking pollen with quantum dots
SCIENCE DAILY
They call it puppy love, but what is it really?
PHYS.ORG
Vets can do more to reduce the suffering of flat-faced dog breeds
PHYS.ORG
Using Therapy Dogs to Reduce Stress and Improve Emotional Well-Being in Vulnerable Individuals
NEWS MEDICAL
Fossil fuels are bad for your health and harmful in many ways besides climate change
PHYS.ORG
When does noise become a message?
PHYS.ORG
Female manakins use male mating call when implanted with male hormones
PHYS.ORG
Our 'bee-eye camera' helps us support bees, grow food and protect the environment
PHYS.ORG
How drought affects freshwater fish
PHYS.ORG
UH marine mammal research captures rare video of newborn humpback whale
PHYS.ORG
Cloning monkeys for research puts humans on a slippery ethical slope
PHYS.ORG
Using artificial intelligence to save bees
PHYS.ORG
Fresh