Animals
Susceptibility of ferrets, cats, dogs, and other domesticated animals to SARS-coronavirus 2  Science Magazine · 3 minutes
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes the infectious disease COVID-19, which was first reported in Wuhan, China in December, 2019. Despite the... more
Monkeys, elephants and dogs reclaim India's streets in virus lockdown  PHYS.ORG · 36 minutes
Hundreds of monkeys have taken over the streets around India's presidential palace, leading an animal offensive taking advantage of deserted streets as the country remains under a coronavirus... more
How does habitat fragmentation affect Amazonian birds?  SCIENCE DAILY · 41 minutes
The Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP), located near Manaus, Brazil, began in 1979 and is the world's longest-running experimental study of tropical forest fragments. A new article summarizes four decades of data... more
Researchers assess bird flu virus subtypes in China  SCIENCE DAILY · 55 minutes
The avian influenza virus subtype H16N3 is currently detectable in many countries. To examine the potential threat to humans of H16N3, researchers recently performed an extensive avian influenza surveillance in major wild... more
Therapy dogs may help lower emergency clinicians' stress  SCIENCE DAILY · 55 minutes
New research indicates that for physicians and nurses working evening shifts in the emergency department, interacting with a therapy dog for several minutes may help lower stress. more
Coquí fossil from Puerto Rico takes title of oldest Caribbean frog  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
The bright chirp of the coquí frog, the national symbol of Puerto Rico, has likely resounded through Caribbean forests for at least 29 million years. A... more
Exploring why males are larger than females among mammals  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 hour
In most animals, females are larger than males, but in most mammals, males are larger than females. A new analysis examines the potential drivers of these differences. more
Lockdown can be stressful for pets too – here's how to keep your dog entertained  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
Many of us have been adjusting to new routines these past few weeks. Working from home comes with... more
Immune-system cells of fish are ingesting plastic—and then dying  PHYS.ORG · 2 hours
It's become an all-too-common variety of news story: Dead whales whose digestive systems are clogged with plastic. Increasing numbers of seabirds eating plastic, often with dire consequences. Ditto with turtles... more
'Disco' tardigrade parties under microscope, wins international photo prize  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 hours
A tardigrade, a mouse brain and a wasp ovary were some of the standout images in a contest celebrating the beauty in the very small. more
Insects as food and feed: research and innovation drive growing field  nanowerk · 6 hours
As the global food supply faces the dual challenge of climate change and a growing human population, innovative minds are turning to a novel source for... more
Exploring why males are larger than females among mammals  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
In most animals, females are larger than males, but in most mammals, males are larger than females. A new analysis published in Mammal Review examines the potential drivers of these... more
How does habitat fragmentation affect Amazonian birds?  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
The Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP), located near Manaus, Brazil, began in 1979 and is the world's longest-running experimental study of tropical forest fragments. A new paper in The Condor: Ornithological Applications... more
Researchers show how forest loss leads to spread of disease  PHYS.ORG · 7 hours
Viruses that jump from animals to people, like the one responsible for COVID-19, will likely become more common as people continue to transform natural habitats into agricultural land,... more
Study shows how forest loss puts people at greater risk of infectious diseases  NEWS MEDICAL · 12 hours
Viruses that jump from animals to people, like the one responsible for COVID-19, will likely become more common as people continue to... more
Coqui fossil from Puerto Rico takes title of oldest Caribbean frog  PHYS.ORG · 15 hours
The bright chirp of the coquí frog, the national symbol of Puerto Rico, has likely resounded through Caribbean forests for at least 29 million years. more
How forest loss leads to spread of disease  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
In Uganda, loss of forested habitat increases the likelihood of interactions between disease-carrying wild primates and humans. The findings suggest the emergence and spread of viruses, such as the one that causes... more
Climate change to affect fish sizes and complex food webs  SCIENCE DAILY · 18 hours
Global climate change will affect fish sizes in unpredictable ways and, consequently, impact complex food webs in our oceans, a new study has shown. The study analyzed three... more
How wallflowers evolved a complementary pair of plant defenses  SCIENCE DAILY · 20 hours
A pair of chemicals used by wallflowers and their kin to ward off predators have evolved to complement each other, with one targeting generalist herbivores and the other targeting specialized... more
How wallflowers evolved a complementary pair of plant defenses  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
A pair of chemicals used by wallflowers and their kin to ward off predators have evolved to complement each other, with one targeting generalist herbivores and the other targeting specialised... more
Building a bean that resists leafhoppers  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
Leafhoppers are tiny insects. They are only about 3 millimeters long, smaller than a grain of rice. But they can cause big damage to crops, including beans. more
Aquatic ancestors of terrestrial millipedes characterized for the first time  PHYS.ORG · 23 hours
Insects, spiders and millipedes make up the majority of all animals on land. While today not many of them live in the water, their ancestors were once aquatic. more
Scientists develop new way to identify the sex of sea turtle hatchlings  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
Unlike humans, sea turtles and other reptiles like crocodiles do not have sex chromosomes. Their sex is defined during development by the incubation environment.... more
How the Cold War is helping the biggest fish in the sea  PHYS.ORG · 24 hours
It might surprise you to learn that nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War are now helping conserve whale sharks, the largest living fish. more
Lifestyle trumps geography in determining makeup of gut microbiome  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Researchers studied the gut microbiomes of wild apes in the Republic of Congo, of captive apes in zoos in the US, and of people from around the world and discovered... more
Stream pollution from mountaintop mining doesn't stay put in the water  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Since the 1980s, a mountaintop mine in West Virginia has been leaching selenium into nearby streams at levels deemed unsafe for aquatic life. Now, even though... more
How understanding the dynamics of yeast prions can shed light on neurodegenerative diseases  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
Prions are a class of misfolded proteins that form aggregates called "amyloid fibrils." These aggregates are the main culprit behind severe mammalian... more
Scientists' warning to humanity on insect extinctions  SCIENCE DAILY · 1 day
As the human race continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists have found that the planet's insects are also facing a crisis after accelerating rates of extinction have led to a worldwide fall in... more
Fungi found in cotton can decrease root knot nematode galling  PHYS.ORG · 1 day
Texas A&M University scientists found that a surprising number of fungi naturally associated with cultivated cotton were capable of curtailing the negative effects of a plant parasite known... more
Study highlights a new way to identify antibiotic resistance genes  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Apes in U.S. zoos host bacterial communities in their intestinal tracts that are more similar to those of people who eat a non-Western diet than to the gut... more
New insight on mechanism of prions brings hope for treating neurodegenerative diseases  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Prions are a class of misfolded proteins that form aggregates called "amyloid fibrils." These aggregates are the main culprit behind severe mammalian neurodegenerative diseases... more
Scientists suggest practical steps to halt the decline of insect population  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
SOME of the tiniest creatures on the planet are vital for the environment. But there is a worldwide fall in insect numbers after an accelerating rate... more
How do viruses mutate and jump to humans?  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Zoonotic spillover events like the current novel coronavirus pandemic present threats to human health. But what is zoonotic spillover and how do they occur? more
Tiger with SARS-CoV-2 infection demostrates reverse zoonosis  NEWS MEDICAL · 1 day
Some viruses come from animals and jump to humans to cause disease. In the case of the novel coronavirus, now known as the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), it is thought to... more
A Tiger Has Coronavirus. Should You Worry About Your Pets?  NPR · 2 days
Four tigers and three lions at the Bronx Zoo all had one of the symptoms of a respiratory infection: a dry cough. What does this finding mean for... more
Innovative birds are less vulnerable to extinction  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Bird species that have the capacity to express novel foraging behaviors are less vulnerable to extinction than species that do not, according to a collaborative study. more
Fossil teeth yield oldest genetic material from extinct human species  REUTERS · 2 days
Scientists have extracted from dental enamel the oldest human genetic material ever obtained, helping clarify the... more
Lifestyle trumps geography in determining makeup of gut microbiome  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Apes in U.S. zoos host bacterial communities in their intestinal tracts that are more similar to those of people who eat a non-Western diet than to the gut makeup of... more
Scientists' warning to humanity on insect extinctions  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Some of the tiniest creatures on the planet are vital for the environment. But there is a worldwide fall in insect numbers after an accelerating rate of extinction. more
Innovative birds are less vulnerable to extinction  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Bird species that have the capacity to express novel foraging behaviours are less vulnerable to extinction than species that do not, according to a collaborative study involving McGill University and CREAF Barcelona and published... more
Rare bee has a body that's half-male, half-female, and split exactly down the middle  LIVE SCIENCE · 2 days
Gynandromorphy produced a bee with half of its body displaying female features, and the other half of its body showing... more
The ocean's 'biological pump' captures more carbon than expected  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Every spring in the Northern Hemisphere, the ocean surface erupts in a massive bloom of phytoplankton. Like plants, these single-celled floating organisms use photosynthesis to turn light into energy, consuming... more
Climate change to affect fish sizes and complex food webs  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Global climate change will affect fish sizes in unpredictable ways and, consequently, impact complex food webs in our oceans, a new IMAS-led study has shown. more
Efforts to control livestock disease PPRV should focus on herd management style, not age  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
The risk of transmitting the virus PPRV, which produces a highly infectious and often fatal disease in sheep and goats,... more
New therapy could combat persistent joint infections in horses  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
A new therapy could combat persistent joint infections in horses, potentially saving them from years of pain. Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a platelet-rich... more
Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial death have been unknown. more
Insect wings hold antimicrobial clues for improved medical implants  SCIENCE DAILY · 2 days
Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial death have been unknown. Using... more
'Tiger King' and America's captive tiger problem  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Netflix's new docuseries "Tiger King" takes viewers into the strange world of big cat collectors. Featuring eccentric characters with names like Joe Exotic and Bhagavan "Doc" Antle, the series touches on polygamy, addiction and... more
Study unravels antibacterial effects of nanopillars in insect wings  NEWS MEDICAL · 2 days
Some insect wings such as cicada and dragonfly possess nanopillar structures that kill bacteria upon contact. However, to date, the precise mechanisms that cause bacterial death have been unknown. more
Great apes and COVID-19: Experts raise the alarm for endangered species  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Primate experts warn that the global human health emergency of COVID-19 also threatens our closest living relatives—endangered great apes. more
Study: Genes that time juvenile-to-adult transition are triggered by a single protein  PHYS.ORG · 2 days
Genes that time the transition to adulthood are well-studied in the roundworm C. elegans, and at least partially conserved in mammals, where they regulate... more
Tiger at zoo tests positive for coronavirus  ABC NEWS · 2 days
A tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City has tested positive for the new coronavirus more
Bronx Zoo tiger infected with COVID-19  LIVE SCIENCE · 3 days
The female tiger named Nadia is one of six big cats that appear to have contracted the coronavirus from a zoo caretaker. more
Tiger at NYC's Bronx Zoo tests positive for coronavirus  ABC NEWS · 3 days
A tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City has tested positive for the new coronavirus more
Dog food delivered to western Alaska amid virus concerns  ABC NEWS · 5 days
Two animal welfare groups combined to have 8,000 pounds of dog food delivered to southwest Alaska more
Symmetry breaking in hydrodynamic forces drives meiotic spindle rotation in mammalian oocytes  Science Magazine · 5 days
Patterned cell divisions require a precisely oriented spindle that segregates chromosomes and determines the cytokinetic plane. In this study, we investigated how the meiotic... more
Genome elimination mediated by gene expression from a selfish chromosome  Science Magazine · 5 days
Numerous plants and animals harbor selfish B chromosomes that "drive" or transmit themselves at super-Mendelian frequencies, despite long-term fitness costs to the organism. Currently, it is unknown how... more
New temperature sensing mechanism in plants  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Cell biologists reveal the phytochrome B molecule has unexpected dynamics activated by temperature, and behaves differently depending on the temperature and type of light. As climate change warms the world, crop growth patterns and flowering times... more
Homo erectus Existed 200,000 Years Earlier than Previously Thought  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
An international team of paleoanthropologists has unearthed a 2-million-year-old skull of Homo erectus, the first of our ancestors... more
BioTek launches new Cell Count & Viability Starter Kit  NEWS MEDICAL · 5 days
BioTek Instruments today introduced a new kit that can help researchers quickly obtain high-quality cell count results by automating the often tedious and error-prone process of mammalian cell counting. more
First SARS-CoV-2 genomes in Austria openly available  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
The COVID-19 outbreak caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 12 March 2020. It is thought to have been transmitted from wild animals to humans... more
Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
Melatonin controls the body clock—high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening. However, the hormone also plays an important role in animals' biological rhythms. Artificial light at night—light pollution—can suppress the production of melatonin... more
Endangered wild dogs snapped in South Sudan  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
We promised you further fascinating footage from one of Africa's most neglected wildlife hotspots, and here it is. One of the continent's rarest and most elusive carnivores has been captured on camera in South... more
Do urban fish exhibit impaired sleep?  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Melatonin controls the body clock -- high melatonin levels make us feel tired in the evening. However, the hormone also plays an important role in animals' biological rhythms. Artificial light at night -- light pollution --... more
Scientists develop 'backpack' computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild. With new technology, researchers are able to track tiny... more
Tooth be told: Earless seals existed in ancient Australia  PHYS.ORG · 5 days
A fossilised seal tooth found on a Victorian beach could hold the key to uncovering the history and geography of earless seals that graced Australia's shores three million years ago. more
When three species of human ancestor walked the Earth  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
Scientists share details of the most ancient fossil of Homo erectus known and discuss how these new findings are forcing us to rewrite a part of our species' evolutionary history. more
Lucy had an ape-like brain  SCIENCE DAILY · 5 days
A new study led by paleoanthropologists reveals that Lucy's species Australopithecus afarensis had an ape-like brain. However, the protracted brain growth suggests that -- as is the case in humans -- infants may have had a long dependence... more
90-Million-Year-Old Fossilized Rainforest Discovered in Antarctica  SCI-NEWS.COM · 5 days
An international team of paleontologists and geologists has uncovered well-preserved fossilized roots, pollen and spores of 90-million-year-old (mid-Cretaceous period) rainforest trees in West Antarctica.... more
41 million-year-old insect sex romp preserved in amber  LIVE SCIENCE · 5 days
Amber from Australia holds some of the continent's oldest known specimens of preserved plants and animals, and includes a pair of flies trapped while mating. more
Can cats and dogs catch or spread COVID-19?  NEWS MEDICAL · 6 days
A recent report from Hong Kong that two dogs had tested positive for the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 had pet owners in a tizzy. This was compounded by news that a cat owned... more
Scientists develop 'backpack' computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild. With new technology described today (April 2) in PLOS... more
Contemporaneity of Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and early Homo erectus in South Africa  Science Magazine · 6 days
Understanding the extinction of Australopithecus and origins of Paranthropus and Homo in South Africa has been hampered by the perceived complex geological context of hominin fossils,... more
Whooping cranes form larger flocks as wetlands are lost—and it may put them at risk  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Over the past few decades, the critically endangered whooping crane (Grus Americana) has experienced considerable recovery. However, in... more
Six million-year-old bird skeleton points to arid past of Tibetan plateau  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found a new species of sandgrouse in six to... more
Australopithecus afarensis Had Ape-Like Brain Organization, But Prolonged Brain Growth Like Humans  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
Human brains are three times larger, are organized differently, and mature for a longer period of time than those of our closest living relatives,... more
Fossil trove sheds light on ancient antipodean ecology  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The oldest known animals and plants preserved in amber from Southern Gondwana are reported in Scientific Reports this week. Gondwana, the supercontinent made up of South America, Africa, Madagascar, India, Antarctica and... more
Regulatory pathway modulates infection-related morphogenesis and pathogenicity in insecticidal fungus  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Prof. WAMG Sibao from Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and Prof. Wei Gang from CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational... more
Baby steps: Ancient skull helps trace path to modern childhood  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Within our extended primate family consisting of lemurs, monkeys, and apes, humans have the largest brains. Our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, weigh about two-thirds as much as us,... more
As ships move north with climate change, their noise scares Arctic cod away  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
When people who haven't been to the Arctic think of this remote and cold region, they may picture animals, such as polar... more
Routine and learning games: How to make sure your dog doesn't get canine cabin fever  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
As coronavirus forces us to isolate, some news outlets are suggesting now is the ideal time to bring... more
Calusa People Stored Live Fish in Watercourts  SCI-NEWS.COM · 6 days
In the 16th century, the Calusa, a fisher-gatherer-hunter society, were the most politically complex polity in Florida, and Mound Key, an island... more
Fossil skull casts doubt over modern human ancestry  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
Griffith University scientists have led an international team to date the skull of an early human found in Africa, potentially upending human evolution knowledge with their discovery. more
Rodents and a rocket carried these researchers' dreams to space  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The human body evolved within the constant force of Earth's gravity. To prevent bone and muscle atrophy during their stays in space, astronauts must exercise every day. For... more
Study finds fish have diverse, distinct gut microbiomes  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
The rich biodiversity of coral reefs even extends to microbial communities within fish, according to new research. The study in Proceedings of the Royal Society: Biological Sciences reports that several important grazing... more
A next-generation sensor network for tracking small animals  PHYS.ORG · 6 days
A newly developed wireless biologging network (WBN) enables high-resolution tracking of small animals, according to a study published April 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Simon Ripperger of the Leibniz... more
The Latest: Shenzhen bans breeding and eating wild animals  ABC NEWS · 7 days
China's southern technology powerhouse of Shenzhen has issued the most sweeping ban yet on the breeding and consumption of wild animals  in an effort to prevent a future outbreak such... more
Study shows six decades of change in plankton communities  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
The UK's plankton population—microscopic algae and animals which support the entire marine food web—has undergone sweeping changes in the past six decades, according to new research published in Global Change... more
Rootin’, poopin’ African elephants help keep soil fertile  Science Magazine · 7 days
By toppling trees and spreading dung, elephants can enrich soil depleted by cattle more
Climate change may be making migration harder by shortening nightingales' wings  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
The Common Nightingale, known for its beautiful song, breeds in Europe and parts of Asia and migrates to sub-Saharan Africa every winter. A new study suggests... more
American robins now migrate 12 days earlier than in 1994  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Every spring, American robins migrate north from all over the U.S. and Mexico, flying up to 250 miles a day to reach their breeding grounds in Canada and... more
'Starry Night' replica found on peacock spider's butt  LIVE SCIENCE · 7 days
Seven new species of peacock spider have been discovered in Australia, one of which was named for Vincent Van Gogh's Starry Night more
The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced us to a new word: Zoonosis (Op-Ed)  LIVE SCIENCE · 7 days
The recent eruption of COVID-19 near a "wet market" in Wuhan, China, calls our attention to a phenomenon captured by a word increasingly becoming... more
Skull scans reveal evolutionary secrets of fossil brains  PHYS.ORG · 7 days
Scientists have long been able to measure and analyze the fossil skulls of our ancient ancestors to estimate brain volume and growth. The question of how these ancient brains compare to modern... more
Australopithecus afarensis endocasts suggest ape-like brain organization and prolonged brain growth  Science Magazine · 7 days
Human brains are three times larger, are organized differently, and mature for a longer period of time than those of our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees.... more
Elephant welfare can be assessed using two indicators  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
In two new studies, scientists have investigated how to measure stress in semi-captive working elephants. The studies suggest that both physiological and behavioral approaches can be used to reliably assess the well-being... more
About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet  SCIENCE DAILY · 7 days
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. With this result, a study is challenging a long-standing explanation... more
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