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Medical News Today: What religion does to your brain
MNT Have you ever wondered what happens in the brain when you believe in God? We take a look at neuroscientific studies that may explain spiritual experience. 19 hours
What religion does to your brain
MNT Have you ever wondered what happens in the brain when you believe in God? We take a look at neuroscientific studies that may explain spiritual experience. 20 hours
People love to hate do-gooders, especially at work
SCIENCE DAILY Highly cooperative and generous people can attract hatred and social punishment, especially in competitive environments, new University of Guelph study finds. 21 hours
Social media manipulation rising globally, new report warns
PHYS.ORG The manipulation of public opinion over social media platforms has emerged as a critical threat to public life. Around the world, government agencies and political parties are exploiting social media platforms to... 22 hours
A social tool for evaluating the environmental impact of residential buildings
PHYS.ORG The research group ARDITEC from the Higher Technical School of Building Engineering at the University of Seville has led a pioneering European project to calculate the... 1 day
How 'empathy gap' among social workers can affect services for people of color
PHYS.ORG Social workers think of themselves as empathetic individuals—after all, they went into social work specifically to help people. But empathy isn't a... 2 days
Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study
SCIENCE DAILY New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularization and economic growth.... 3 days
Religious change preceded economic change in the 20th century
Science Magazine The decline in the everyday importance of religion with economic development is a well-known correlation, but which phenomenon comes first? Using unsupervised factor analysis and a birth cohort approach to... 3 days
Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study
PHYS.ORG New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularisation and economic growth.... 3 days
Despite digital revolution, distance still matters
SCIENCE DAILY Even when people have well-connected social networks beyond their home cities and across state lines, they are still most frequently interacting with people who are geographically nearby. That is one of the major outcomes of an... 3 days
Science News » “Covert” Neurofeedback Tunes-up the Social Brain in ASD
NIMH Young people with autism unknowingly tuned up flagging neural connections by playing a picture puzzle game that was rigged by their own brain activity. 4 days
More Screen Time For Teens Linked To ADHD Symptoms
NPR A new study finds that teens who engage in frequent texting, social media use and other online activities daily are more likely to develop symptoms of ADHD. 4 days
More Screen Time For Teens May Fuel ADHD Symptoms
NPR A new study finds that teens who engage in frequent texting, social media use and other online activities daily are more likely to develop symptoms of ADHD. 4 days
Social isolation: Animals that break away from the pack can influence evolution
SCIENCE DAILY For some animals -- such as beetles, ants, toads, and primates -- short-term social isolation can be just as vital as social interaction to... 4 days
Social isolation: Animals that break away from the pack can influence evolution
PHYS.ORG For some animals—such as beetles, ants, toads, and primates—short-term social isolation can be just as vital as social interaction to development and long-term evolution.... 4 days
Immigrants and their children are more likely to be profiled for citizenship
PHYS.ORG Law enforcement official are most likely to ask first- or second-generation Latinos for papers proving their right to be in the US. This is... 4 days
In the era of Brexit and fake news, scientists need to embrace social media
PHYS.ORG Social media can be an intimidating place for academics as not all of them take to it like ducks to... 4 days
Sociologist uses Twitter to research criminological behavior online
PHYS.ORG In the modern era of social media, more than 300 million people use Twitter to share news and engage in online conversations. This provides a glimpse into the minds of a diverse... 4 days
Key social reward circuit in the brain impaired in kids with autism
SCIENCE DAILY Children with autism have structural and functional abnormalities in the brain circuit that normally makes social interaction feel rewarding, according to a new study... 5 days
Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait
SCIENCE DAILY The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study, and its removal from the lake could mean... 5 days
Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait
PHYS.ORG The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, and its removal... 5 days
Residential segregation linked with racial disparities in firearm homicide fatalities
NEWS MEDICAL Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. 5 days
Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?
PHYS.ORG Isabelle Côté is an SFU professor of marine ecology and conservation and an active science communicator whose prime social media platform is Twitter. 1 week
'No evidence' grammar schools can promote social mobility, study suggests
PHYS.ORG Expanding the number of grammar schools is unlikely to promote social mobility by providing more opportunities for disadvantaged pupils, a new study published in Educational Review finds. 1 week
About half of parents use cell phones while driving with young children in the car
SCIENCE DAILY A new study found that in the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell... 1 week
Understanding the social dynamics that cause cooperation to thrive, or fail
PHYS.ORG Examples of cooperation abound in nature, from honeybee hives to human families. Yet it's also easy enough to find examples of selfishness and conflict. Studying the... 1 week
Treatment prevents symptoms of schizophrenia in tests with rats
SCIENCE DAILY Researchers carried out studies in animal model that mimics condition in children and adolescents considered at risk for development of the disease in adulthood. Young and hypertense rats displaying cognitive... 1 week
Researchers identify factors associated with cell phone-related distracted driving in parents
NEWS MEDICAL A new study from a team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that in the previous... 1 week
Primates adjust grooming to their social environment
SCIENCE DAILY Researcher show that wild chimpanzees and sooty mangabeys, two primate species who live in complex social groups, choose their grooming partners based on a variety of criteria, including their social relationship with them and... 1 week
Social Science One set to release massive trove of Facebook data for research purposes
PHYS.ORG It seems Christmas is coming early this year for social scientists. 1 week
What If AI Psychopath 'Norman' and Amazon's Alexa Got Together?
LIVE SCIENCE Who's values would win out? 1 week
Longer hours on social media may increase teens' risk of cyberbullying
SCIENCE DAILY Cyberbullying may be linked to higher use of social network sites by school children aged 14-17 years, rather than to simply having a social network profile,... 2 weeks
‘Left-cradling bias’ linked to better social cognitive abilities in children
SCIENCE DAILY Children who cradle dolls on the left tend to show higher social cognitive abilities than those who do not, according to new research. 2 weeks
A new study identifies 40 genes related to aggressive behavior in humans and mice
SCIENCE DAILY The origins of the violent behavior are multifactorial and respond to the interaction of several factors --biological, cultural, social, etc.... 2 weeks
Two NASA satellites confirm Tropical Cyclone Ampil's heaviest rainfall shift
PHYS.ORG
NASA prepares to launch Parker Solar Probe, a mission to touch the Sun
PHYS.ORG
Researchers report two-faced Janus membrane applications
PHYS.ORG
What Hollywood gets right and wrong about hacking
PHYS.ORG
'Storm chasers' on Mars searching for dusty secrets
PHYS.ORG
Rapid cloud clearing phenomenon could provide another piece of climate puzzle
SCIENCE DAILY
Shallow reef species may not find refuge in deeper water habitats
SCIENCE-NEWS
Traveling to the sun: Why won't Parker Solar Probe melt?
PHYS.ORG
‘Smart plants’ could soon detect deadly radon and mold in your home
Science Magazine
Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines
SCIENCE DAILY
Video: The chemistry of food cooking
PHYS.ORG
Newly discovered armored dinosaur from Utah reveals intriguing family history
PHYS.ORG
Tropical Cyclone Son-Tinh makes landfall and NASA examines its trail of rainfall
PHYS.ORG
In a ‘tour de force,’ researchers image an entire fly brain in minute detail
Science Magazine
This colorful web is the most complete look yet at a fruit fly’s brain cells
SCIENCE-NEWS
Bengal cat receives first feline hip replacement surgery performed at Purdue Veterinary Teaching Hospital
PHYS.ORG
New ‘Poké Ball’ robot catches deep-sea critters without harming them
SCIENCE-NEWS
Watch this origami fish grabber nab a deep-sea squid
Science Magazine
Team creates high-fidelity images of Sun's atmosphere
PHYS.ORG
Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says
PHYS.ORG