PHYS.ORG According to engineers, root vegetables aren't only good for the body. Their fibres could also help make concrete mixtures stronger and more eco-friendly. 4 weeks
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Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease
SCIENCE DAILY Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. Scientists report that compounds found in the Sakurajima Daikon, or 'monster,' radish could help... 5 days
Compounds in 'monster' radish could help tame cardiovascular disease
PHYS.ORG Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report... 7 days
Young children talking back and forth with adults strengthens brain language region
ABC NEWS Dialogue with adults may lead to stronger pathways between two brain regions. 2 days
A look at how the changing climate is impacting New York State's building stock
PHYS.ORG Much of the talk about buildings and climate change has focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. What often gets overlooked... 1 week
Mass timber: Thinking big about sustainable construction
PHYS.ORG The construction and operation of all kinds of buildings uses vast amounts of energy and natural resources. Researchers around the world have therefore been seeking ways to make buildings more efficient and less dependent... 1 week
Nature holds key to nurturing green water treatment facilities
PHYS.ORG The quest to develop greener and more affordable methods to treat wastewater has taken a new, innovative twist. 2 weeks
Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births
SCIENCE DAILY More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report that they have developed an organ-on-a-chip that could help... 2 weeks
Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births
PHYS.ORG More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering that they have... 2 weeks
Scientists nail the coolest course for marathoners at the 2020 Olympics
Science Magazine Shade from buildings will protect runners from 28°C heat 2 weeks
New, greener prospects for steel waste gases
PHYS.ORG In a new steel plant under construction, the waste gases generated in steelmaking will be used to produce an eco-friendly transport fuel. 6 days
Mass timber: Thinking big about sustainable construction
MIT MIT class designs a prototype building to demonstrate that even huge buildings can be built primarily with wood. 1 week
Sri Lanka reverses hybrid car incentive
PHYS.ORG Sri Lanka Wednesday sharply increased customs duties on imports of the top-selling Japanese hybrid car, in an apparent shift in its policy of encouraging greener vehicles. 2 weeks
Printed electronics breakthrough could lead to flexible electronics revolution
PHYS.ORG A new form of electronics manufacturing which embeds silicon nanowires into flexible surfaces could lead to radical new forms of bendable electronics, scientists say. 2 days
AI system makes finding potholes cheaper and easier
PHYS.ORG Governments may soon be able to use artificial intelligence (AI) to easily and cheaply detect problems with roads, bridges and buildings. 1 week
New competition for MOFs: Scientists make stronger COFs
PHYS.ORG Hollow molecular structures known as COFs (covalent organic frameworks), which could serve as selective filters or containers for other substances and have many other potential uses, also tend to suffer from an... 2 weeks
Mass timber: Thinking big about sustainable construction
SCIENCE DAILY The Longhouse, a prototype 'mass timber' building designed by students, demonstrates that even huge buildings can be built primarily with wood. 1 week
Compounds in 'monster' radish could potentially prevent heart disease and stroke
NEWS MEDICAL Step aside carrots, onions and broccoli. The newest heart-healthy vegetable could be a gigantic, record-setting radish. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and... 6 days
Environmental concerns stronger among younger religious Americans
PHYS.ORG Younger generations of religious Americans tend to closely harbor concerns for the environment via stewardship more so than older parishioners, according to a study by a University of Kansas researcher. 4 days
Foam could offer greener option for petroleum drillers
PHYS.ORG Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, provides critical energy for society, but also uses large amounts of fresh water while producing corresponding amounts of wastewater. Water-based foams, which use about 90 percent less water... 6 days
Predicting genomic instability that can lead to disease
SCIENCE DAILY They are the most common repeated elements in the human genome; more than a million copies are scattered among and between our genes. Called Alu elements, these relatively short, non-coding sequences of... 1 week
New competition for MOFs: Scientists make stronger COFs
SCIENCE DAILY Hollow molecular structures known as COFs suffer from an inherent problem: It's difficult to keep a network of COFs connected in harsh chemical environments. Now, a team has used a chemical process... 2 weeks
Japanese students use VR to recreate Hiroshima bombing
PHYS.ORG It's a sunny summer morning in the city of Hiroshima, Japan. Cicadas chirp in the trees. A lone plane flies high overhead. Then a flash of light, followed by a loud blast.... 1 week
Harmful dyes in lakes, rivers can become colorless with new, sponge-like material
PHYS.ORG VIDEO Dyes are widely used in industries such as textiles, cosmetics, food processing, papermaking and plastics. Globally, we produce about 700,000 metric tons—the weight of... 2 weeks
From office windows to Mars: Scientists debut super-insulating gel
PHYS.ORG VIDEO A new, super-insulating gel developed by researchers at CU Boulder could dramatically increase the energy efficiency of skyscrapers and other buildings, and might one day help scientists build greenhouse-like habitats... 2 days
Study could lead to new diagnostic blood test for Kawasaki disease
NEWS MEDICAL For the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Imperial College London, with international collaborators, have determined that Kawasaki Disease... 1 week
Adult-child conversations strengthen language regions of developing brain
SCIENCE DAILY Young children who are regularly engaged in conversation by adults may have stronger connections between two developing brain regions critical for language, according to a study of healthy young children that confirms... 2 days
Doxorubicin disrupts the immune system to cause heart toxicity
SCIENCE DAILY Doxorubicin is a chemotherapy drug used in ovarian, bladder, lung, thyroid and stomach cancers, but it carries a harmful side effect. The drug causes a dose-dependent heart toxicity that can... 1 week
Women seeing baby animals have a reduced appetite for meat
SCIENCE DAILY Images of baby animals reduces people's appetite for meat say researchers, who found that the effect is much stronger for women than for men. The findings may reflect... 2 weeks
How climate change influences wind power
PHYS.ORG Climate change poses a big challenge for wind energy production in Europe. This is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) using spatially and temporally highly resolved climate... 1 week
Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters
SCIENCE DAILY Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, bringing more than 50 inches of rain and extreme flooding to the city of Houston. In addition to wreaking havoc on buildings and infrastructure,... 7 days
Water matters to metal nanoparticles
PHYS.ORG
Scientists-turned-students guide viewers through ‘The Most Unknown’
SCIENCE-NEWS
Powerful new microscope reveals inner workings of human cells with unprecedented clarity
NEWS MEDICAL
'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone
SCIENCE DAILY
From office windows to Mars: Scientists debut super-insulating gel
PHYS.ORG
With launch looming, the Parker Solar Probe is ready for its star turn
SCIENCE-NEWS
Wearable 'microbrewery' saves human body from radiation damage
PHYS.ORG
How one mom is changing a town's law on breastfeeding
ABC NEWS
Getting more out of microbes—studying Shewanella in microgravity
PHYS.ORG
Space probe to plunge into fiery corona of the sun
PHYS.ORG